A Matter of Degrees: What Temperature Reveals about the Past and Future of Our Species, Planet, and U niverse

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In a wonderful synthesis of science, history, and imagination, Gino Segrè, an internationally renowned theoretical physicist, embarks on a wide-ranging exploration of how the fundamental scientific concept of temperature is bound up with the very essence of both life and matter. Why is the internal temperature of most mammals fixed near 98.6°? How do geologists use temperature to track the history of our planet? Why is the quest for absolute zero and its quantum mechanical significance the key to understanding superconductivity? And what can we learn from neutrinos, the subatomic "messages from the sun" that may hold the key to understanding the birth-and death-of our solar system? In answering these and hundreds of other temperature-sensitive questions, Segrè presents an uncanny view of the world around us.
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About the author

Gino Segrè is professor of physics and astronomy at the University of Pennsylvania. An internationally renowned expert in high-energy elementary-particle theoretical physics, Segrè has served as director of Theoretical Physics at the National Science Foundation and received awards from the National Science Foundation, the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, and the Guggenheim Foundation. This is his first book.
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Additional Information

Publisher
Penguin
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Published on
Jul 1, 2003
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Pages
320
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ISBN
9781101640173
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Language
English
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Genres
Science / Life Sciences / Biophysics
Science / Mechanics / Thermodynamics
Science / Physics / General
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Eligible for Family Library

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