Juliet's Answer: One Man's Search for Love and the Elusive Cure for Heartbreak

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Eat, Pray, Love meets The Rosie Project in this fresh, heartwarming memoir by a man who travels to Verona and volunteers to answer letters addressed to Shakespeare’s Juliet, all in an attempt to heal his own heartbreak.

When Glenn Dixon is spurned by love, he packs his bags for Verona, Italy. Once there, he volunteers to answer the thousands of letters that arrive addressed to Juliet—letters sent from lovelorn people all over the world to Juliet’s hometown; people who long to understand the mysteries of the human heart.

Glenn’s journey takes him deep into the charming community of Verona, where he becomes involved in unraveling the truth behind Romeo and Juliet. Did these star-crossed lovers actually exist? Why have they remained at the forefront of hearts and minds for centuries? And what can they teach us about love?

When Glenn returns home to Canada and resumes his duties as an English teacher, he undertakes a lively reading of Romeo and Juliet with his students, engaging them in passions past and present. But in an intriguing reversal of fate and fortune, his students—along with an old friend—instruct the teacher on the true meaning of love, loss, and moving on.

An enthralling tale of modern-day love steeped in the romantic traditions of eras past, this is a memoir that will warm your heart.
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About the author

Glenn Dixon was the 2014 writer-in-residence for the Vancouver International Writers Festival. He has traveled through more than seventt countries and written for National Geographic magazine, the New York Post, The Walrus, and The Globe and Mail. He taught Shakespeare for twenty years, but it’s his hunger for travel and adventure that made him the perfect choice to become one of Juliet’s secretaries.

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Additional Information

Publisher
Simon and Schuster
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Published on
Feb 7, 2017
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Pages
272
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ISBN
9781501141867
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Language
English
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Genres
Biography & Autobiography / Literary Figures
Biography & Autobiography / Personal Memoirs
Literary Criticism / Shakespeare
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Eligible for Family Library

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