The Captain Who Burned His Ships: Captain Thomas Tingey, USN, 1750-1829

Naval Institute Press
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This is the first biography of Captain Thomas Tingey, who was a key figure in the development of the early U.S. Navy. Having come to America after a short service in the Royal Navy, Tingey contributed importantly to the growth of the American Navy, but was then obliged to burn the Washington Navy Yard in 1814 to prevent it from falling into the hands of British invaders. This is at the same time a history of the first quarter-century of the Washington Navy Yard, which Tingey commanded for that period, and of the transition of the young Navy from an object of partisan discord to an honored defender of a growing and increasingly self-confident nation. The book looks at Tingey's contributions to navy yard procedures and practices, his civic role in the budding city of Washington, the dramatic events of 1814, and the rebuilding of the yard as a major technical center for the navy.
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About the author

During a thirty-five-year foreign service career, Gordon S. Brown served mainly in the Middle East and North Africa including assignments as General Schwarzkopf's political advisor in the first Gulf War and ambassador to Mauritania. Since his retirement, he has written Coalition, Coercion, and Compromise, on the diplomacy of the first Gulf War, and The Norman Conquest of Southern Italy and Sicily.

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Additional Information

Publisher
Naval Institute Press
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Published on
Jul 30, 2013
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Pages
224
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ISBN
9781612513980
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Language
English
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Genres
History / Modern / 19th Century
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Available on Android devices
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***

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