Spirit of a Crocodile: Crocodile Spirit Dreaming Books 1 and 3

Graham Wilson

She loves a man who loves crocodiles. This huge predator is a source of pure terror. Inside the man she sees his spirit and the predator in equal shares. Now it seeks to possess her too. Could he have hurt others, is she next? She is a visitor, far from an English home. She must escape! She gets away. But it pulls her back. Now locked in a cage, this other being her only company. What can she do?

She loved a man but a part of his soul belongs to a crocodile
Love and terror - two parts shared. Had he hurt others, girls whose photos she finds?
She knew she must escape. She fled from him but could not leave this spirit behind - now it possesses her too.
It draws her to itself. She finds herself locked in a cage with only this demon for company. Where can she safely go?

Susan is an English backpacker who goes on a holiday to outback Australia. She meets a charming man, is drawn into a passionate affair and travels with him into the remotest parts. But all is not as it seems. He has a fascination with crocodiles, they are his spirit totem ancestor. She realises he is dangerous and may have harmed others. Finally she escapes but the consequences follow her and the thing she thought she had left behind is trying to take over her mind.

This box set contains the first two books of the 'Crocodile Spirit Dreaming Series', "Just Visiting' and "Creature of an Ancient Dreaming" Set in the outback of Australia it is an impossible love story, about blinding love and then loss and pain which follows when it is suddenly ripped away.

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About the author

Graham Wilson lives in Sydney Australia. He has completed and published nine separate books, and also a range of combined novel box sets.

They comprise two series,
1. The Old Balmain House Series
2. The Crocodile Spirit Dreaming Series

along with a family memoir. Children of Arnhem's Kaleidoscope

The first series starts with a novel called The Old Balmain House, based on an old a weatherboard cottage in Sydney where the author lived. Here a photo was discovered of a small girl who lived and died about 100 years ago. The book imagines the story of her life and family, based in the real Balmain, an early inner Sydney suburb, with it's locations and and historical events providing part of the story background. The second novel in this series, Lizzie's Tale builds on The Old Balmain House setting, It is the story of a working class teenage girl who lives in this same house in the 1950s and 1960s, It tells of how, when she becomes pregnant she is determined not to surrender her baby for adoption, and of her struggle to survive in this unforgiving society. The third novel in this series, Devil's Choice, follows the next generation of the family in Lizzie's Tale. Lizzie's daughter is faced with the awful choice of whether to seek the help of one of her mother's rapists' in trying to save the life of her own daughter who is inflicted with an incurable disease.

The Crocodile Spirit Dreaming Series comprises five novels based in Outback Australia. The first novel Just Visiting. tells the story of an English backpacker, Susan, who visits the Northern Territory and becomes captivated and in great danger from a man who loves crocodiles. The second book in the series, Creature of an Ancient Dreaming, (previously The Diary), follows the consequences of the first book based around the discovery of this man's remains and his diary and Susan, being placed on trial for murder. The third book, The Empty Place, is about Susan's struggle to retain her sanity in jail while her family and friends desperately try to find out what really happened on that fateful day before it is too late. In Lost Girls Susan vanishes and it tells the story of the search for her and four other lost girls whose passports were found in the possession of the man she killed. The final book in the series, Sunlit Shadow Dance is the story of a girl who appears in a remote aboriginal community in North Queensland, without any memory except for a name. It tells how she rebuilds her life from an empty shell and how, as fragments of the past return, with them come dark shadows that threaten to overwhelm her.

The book, Children of Arnhem's Kaleidoscope, is the story of the author's own life in the Northern Territory. It tells of his childhood in an aboriginal community in remote Arnhem Land, in Australia's Northern Territory, one of its last frontiers. It tells of the people, danger and beauty of this place, and of its transformation over the last half century with the coming of aboriginal rights and the discovery or uranium. It also tells of his surviving an attack by a large crocodile and of his work over two decades in the outback of the NT.

Books are published as ebooks by Smashwords, Amazon, Kobo, Ibooks and other major ebook publishers. Some books are available in print through Amazon Create Space.

Graham is in the early stages of planning a memoir about his family's connections with Ireland called Memories Only Remain and also is compiling information for a book about the early NT cattle industry, its people and its stories.

Graham writes for the creative pleasure it brings him. He is particularly gratified each time an unknown person chooses to download and read something he has written and write a review - good or bad, as this gives him an insight into what readers enjoy and helps him make ongoing improvements to his writing.

In his non writing life Graham is a veterinarian who work in wildlife conservation and for rural landholders. He lived a large part of his life in the Northern Territory and his books reflect this experience.

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Additional Information

Publisher
Graham Wilson
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Published on
Aug 1, 2016
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Pages
400
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ISBN
9781311811400
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Features
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Language
English
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Genres
Fiction / Mystery & Detective / International Mystery & Crime
Fiction / Thrillers / Crime
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Content Protection
This content is DRM free.
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Read Aloud
Available on Android devices
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Eligible for Family Library

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Graham Wilson
The girl you love vanishes - you search and search. No trace of her is found.

You find one who looks just like her - her eyes see you but they do not know you, no recognition flickers - is it a mirage, dream or desperate hope?

She likes you. You ask and she comes with you. Her mind sees sunlight. You see dark shadowed edges.
Can you remake your life with a person who holds no memory of you. An unknown girl appears on an aboriginal community in far north Queensland. She has no memory of any life before, no one knows her.
Who is she? Where has she come from?
 She looks like a missing backpacker, Susan, she sounds like Susan, but her name is Jane. Her past life is an unknown place from where she knows no one. Now she has to try to make a new life without any connections to her past.

This is the final book of the Crocodile Spirit Dreaming Series. It tells the story of an English backpacker who went traveling in Outback Australia with a man who loved crocodiles, and how her life turned into a horror nightmare. Finally she gets her freedom only to disappear.

Susan was on trial for murder when she vanished. She had been just released on bail, despite pleading guilty, when new evidence indicating self-defense was found. She was also pregnant and expecting twins.

Since she has gone only a pair of shoes she was wearing have been found. They were next to a waterhole full of crocodiles. It is feared that she and her unborn children are dead, taken by crocodiles.

More than a year passes without any other trace of her. An inquest has made an open finding on her disappearance.

What is the link between Susan and this girl Jane who turns up out of nowhere, knowing no one, remembering nothing? Can this girl, Jane, build a new and happy life with just her two small children. Can a tragedy of the past ever be overcome?

This is the story of the remaking of a new life from the broken shell of the old - how memories of the old threaten to tear apart the new. And always, at the dark edge, lurks an ancient creature of the deep, a being whose lineage is the long lost Australian dreamtime, before the spirits made this land. Yet from this dark can come a new place, a place where sunlit shadows dance.

 

Graham Wilson
It was hot. There was sudden stillness in the late afternoon air and the surface of the small waterhole shone with unnatural smoothness. Fresh pig tracks at water's edge suggested pigs just gone. Two bubbles popped to the surface near the edge of the pool; just decaying vegetation, said my mind. I should have smelt crocodile!

A story of a missionary family in remote aboriginal Australia.

What is it about the Northern Territory that fascinates?

I have only to mention it’s name in conversation and people turn to listen.

Why, for 180 years, has it drawn people from all over to come, stay longer than they imagined and, often, never leave?
This book is a memoir of a family's life in a remote aboriginal community, in Australia's Northern Territory, something the equivalent of remote Canada or Alaska, where few people go.

The place Oenpelli,(now Gunbalanya) is near Kadadu National Park, made famous in Crocodile Dundee.

This story tells of changing world as a missionary family and an aboriginal community become part of modern Australia
This our family's story, growing amongst the people, animals and places and colours of this this strange land, alongside an aboriginal community going through its own changes; citizenship, alcohol, uranium mining, land rights, outstation development, and community self management.

It is a memoir of growing up in one of the most isolated parts of Australia - in a small aboriginal missionary community in the Northern Territory, something the equivalent of the remote Canada or Alaska. It is the landscape featured in the movie Crocodile Dundee.

It tells of the huge change in this place in the last half century with the coming of land rights and aboriginal self determination. It also tells of my mother and fathers lives and Christian beliefs which motivated their contribution to this change.

It is a story of my memories and love for this remote and beautiful place, in which I lived as a child then worked as an adult and of many NT characters who gave me the memories.It is also the story of me working as an adult across many parts of the NT and about the hardy, outlandish characters that inhabit this place.

It also tells of my own experience of surviving attack by a large crocodile in a remote swamp

It also provides a foundation for my novels in the Crocodile Spirit Dreaming Series. The places in these books are the places in which I lived and worked and many of the stories came little changed from people I knew. In particular my experience in surviving a crocodile attack of a large saltwater crocodile, which mauled my leg as told in this book forms part of the central role of the crocodile as a predator in this novel series.

The role of my father in opening road transport including building a crossing of the East Alligator River, developing outstations for aboriginal communities, learning to fly on missionary wages and establishing an aviation service along with assisting the aboriginal peoples of this land to gain royalties from mining is a story that deserves to be told as a major part of NT history. Along with his tireless work the contribution of many others is also an essential part of the story. 

Graham Wilson
Raped and reduced to working in a brothel to keep her baby, unwed, teenage mother, Lizzie, forges a new life for herself and her child in the Kimberley region of Australia. But can she evade her persecutors and ultimately bring to them to justice?

This is a story of a girl from inner Sydney. Her family is poor, her father dies when she is nine, life is hard. But her courage rises above adversity. It is story of her struggle to survive and make a life of her own, first as a prostitute, then with her child in a remote outback town.

This is the second book in the series, "Old Balmain House" and begins in the same house as the first book and continues part of the story of Sophie, the girl who vanished half a century ago. Lizzie, aged eight, meets Sophie, the girl who lived in the same bedroom as a child. Sophie becomes her friend.

When Lizzie turns fifteen Sophie tries to warn her not to go in a car with three older boys.
Lizzie ignores her warning and is brutally raped by these three men.

Lizzie becomes pregnant and is determined to keep her child. She leaves Sydney and goes to Melbourne, to have and keep her baby. Here, penniless and desperate, she become a prostitute the only way she can support herself. She is discovered and the authorities try to take her child.

She flees to Broome, a small town in the furthest corner of of Australia. Here she assumes the role of widow with a small child and settles into this friendly town. Her life is good until a man from her former life finds her and threatens to expose her or harm her child.

She runs again. On a remote desert road her car breaks down. Without water, with her six year old daughter beside her, they face death from thirst. Help comes in an unexpected way. She takes refuge in a local aboriginal community.

Her school friend from Balmain, now a journalist, seeks retribution from the the men who raped Lizzie many years ago and have continued their ways with others. Now, as successful business men, they seek to use the law to deny justice.
Graham Wilson
Sophie vanished - where did she go? For 100 years nobody knows.

A photo of 8 year old Sophie and an antique perfume bottle are found in the fireplace of an old house.

The story of a Balmain family over 170 years. Finally they uncover what happened.

Set around beautiful Sydney Harbour this is a story of this place and its people, an imagined history from early Australia to the present day.

Who was Sophie and what happened to her?

On buying an old weatherboard house in Balmain, Sydney, we discover her photo, dated 1900-1908, long hidden, along with a small perfume bottle in an old fireplace. Then we discover that Sophie disappeared with a childhood friend in 1908 and was never seem again, leaving a trail of sadness through generations of her family.

This book tracks the journey of the discovery of Sophie and her family, from their first arrival in Sydney, over five generations of the family, until the mystery is finally laid to rest.

It is a story of loss and grief, mixed with joy, which passes through the successive generations of a family. The way the family deals with unresolved tragedy and finally the the way their love transcends time is the story from which the real Sophie emerges.

Graham Wilson, the author, lived in the house in Balmain around which this story is based for seven years, before moving to Millers Point. This is his first novel.

Graham has previously written a family memoir, “Children of Arnhem’s Kaleidoscope” which describes his childhood, growing up in a aboriginal community in Western Arnhem Land. This is also available from this site.

Graham Wilson
The Australian Imperial Force, first raised in 1914 for overseas war service, became better known by its initials - the "AIF". There was a distinct character to those who enlisted in the earliest months and who were destined to fight on Gallipoli. During the war the AIF took its place among the great armies of the world, on some of history's oldest battlefields. The Australians would attack at the Dardanelles, enter Jerusalem and Damascus, defend Amiens and Ypres, and swagger through the streets of Cairo, Paris, and London, with their distinctive slouch hats and comparative wealth of six shillings per day. However, the legend of the AIF is shrouded in myth and mystery. Was Beersheba the last great cavalry charge in history? Did the AIF storm the red light district of Cairo and burn it to ground while fighting running battles with the military police? Was the AIF the only all-volunteer army of World War I? Graham Wilson's Bully Beef and Balderdash shines an unforgiving light on these and other well-known myths of the AIF in World War I, arguing that these spectacular legends simply serve to diminish the hard-won reputation of the AIF as a fighting force. Graham Wilson mounts his own campaign to rehabilitate the historical reputation of the force and to demonstrate that misleading and inaccurate embellishment does nothing but hide the true story of Australia's World War I fighting army. Bully Beef and Balderdash deliberately tilts at some well loved windmills and, for those who cherish the mythical story of the AIF, this will not be comfortable reading. Yet, given the extraordinary truth of the AIF's history, it is certainly compelling reading.
Francis Graham Wilson
"A growing body of readers is rediscovering Francis Graham Wilson's tremendous contribution to the study of politics and humane learning. In this volume he offers an extensive assessment of the nature of politics and the search for order in Spanish politics, concentrating on the central figures who defended the Church and communities during the Spanish Civil War. The book argues for the uniqueness of Spain among the other countries of Europe. For Wilson, the most salutary attribute of Spanish politics is found in the assemblage of smaller groupings of the citizenry within the larger society in communities; and it is in the smaller association that the most important aspects of moral, social and political life were nurtured. Part 1 includes assessments of three eminent Spanish traditionalists, Juan Donoso Cortes, Jaime Balmes, and Menendez Pelayo, as well as studies of central figures from the period of the Spanish Civil War??Jose Antonio and Ramiro de Maeztu. The final chapters are taken from an unpublished book-length manuscript, ""An Anchor in the Latin Mind,"" that Wilson had completed at the time of his death in 1976, and was recently discovered by the editors. For Wilson, Latin thinkers possess advantages others do not??a political realism that can be reinvigorated. The recovery of Spanish traditionalism, according to this book, is dependent upon a return to the self-understanding of the ordering principles of Spanish politics and society. Wilson's affirmation of a Spanish traditionalist inheritance during his lifetime encouraged a return to authentic popular rule and a greater appreciation of Spanish achievements in politics and the moral life."
Graham Wilson
Raped and reduced to working in a brothel to keep her baby, unwed, teenage mother, Lizzie, forges a new life for herself and her child in the Kimberley region of Australia. But can she evade her persecutors and ultimately bring to them to justice?

This is a story of a girl from inner Sydney. Her family is poor, her father dies when she is nine, life is hard. But her courage rises above adversity. It is story of her struggle to survive and make a life of her own, first as a prostitute, then with her child in a remote outback town.

This is the second book in the series, "Old Balmain House" and begins in the same house as the first book and continues part of the story of Sophie, the girl who vanished half a century ago. Lizzie, aged eight, meets Sophie, the girl who lived in the same bedroom as a child. Sophie becomes her friend.

When Lizzie turns fifteen Sophie tries to warn her not to go in a car with three older boys.
Lizzie ignores her warning and is brutally raped by these three men.

Lizzie becomes pregnant and is determined to keep her child. She leaves Sydney and goes to Melbourne, to have and keep her baby. Here, penniless and desperate, she become a prostitute the only way she can support herself. She is discovered and the authorities try to take her child.

She flees to Broome, a small town in the furthest corner of of Australia. Here she assumes the role of widow with a small child and settles into this friendly town. Her life is good until a man from her former life finds her and threatens to expose her or harm her child.

She runs again. On a remote desert road her car breaks down. Without water, with her six year old daughter beside her, they face death from thirst. Help comes in an unexpected way. She takes refuge in a local aboriginal community.

Her school friend from Balmain, now a journalist, seeks retribution from the the men who raped Lizzie many years ago and have continued their ways with others. Now, as successful business men, they seek to use the law to deny justice.
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