Physiological Aesthetics

New York : D. Appleton
Loading...

Additional Information

Publisher
New York : D. Appleton
Read more
Published on
Dec 31, 1877
Read more
Pages
283
Read more
Read more
Best For
Read more
Language
English
Read more
Content Protection
This content is DRM free.
Read more

Reading information

Smartphones and Tablets

Install the Google Play Books app for Android and iPad/iPhone. It syncs automatically with your account and allows you to read online or offline wherever you are.

Laptops and Computers

You can read books purchased on Google Play using your computer's web browser.

eReaders and other devices

To read on e-ink devices like the Sony eReader or Barnes & Noble Nook, you'll need to download a file and transfer it to your device. Please follow the detailed Help center instructions to transfer the files to supported eReaders.
This is a collection of stories by Grant Allen, published in various years.The title story is personal. Allen nearly drowned when he fell through the ice while skating as a boy in Canada, and wrote about the experience anonymously for the Pall Mall Gazette in 1892. He claimed to have been "as dead as he ever can be or will be" and that he had no "after death" experiences. This suited his atheistic position, of course. In fact he was not "dead" at all; just unconscious, and he was quickly revived by brandy and massage.

The stories are:
HOW IT FEELS TO DIE. BY ONE WHO HAS TRIED
IT (1892);
MERIEL STANLEY, POACHER (1900);
A STUDY FROM THE NUDE (1895);
MY ONE GORILLA (1890);
THE TRADE OF AUTHOR (1889);
A SCRIBBLER'S APOLOGY (1883).

The last two are non-fiction essays by Allen about the craft of writing in his time.Here are brief reviews by Peter Morton:

"'A SCRIBBLER'S APOLOGY'. A splendidly agonised piece about the true social worth of the journeyman writer's life, particularly the worth (if any) of the kind of 'tootler' which Allen represents himself as being. Published in the Cornhill in May 1883."

"'THE TRADE OF AUTHOR'. This remarkable article, published in the Fortnightly Review in 1889, has just been identified as by Grant Allen. (It is not attributed in the Wellesley Index.) It is a brilliant analysis of the professional writer's plight at the time, worthy to be set against Gissing's New Grub Street."

The source of these 6 stories is the website by Peter Morton, author of "The Busiest Man in England": Grant Allen and the Writing Trade, 1875-1900, published by Palgrave Macmillan, as linked from the Wikipedia page about Grant Allen.

©2018 GoogleSite Terms of ServicePrivacyDevelopersArtistsAbout Google|Location: United StatesLanguage: English (United States)
By purchasing this item, you are transacting with Google Payments and agreeing to the Google Payments Terms of Service and Privacy Notice.