FMCG: The Power of Fast-Moving Consumer Goods

First Edition Design Pub.
5
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This book is a history of the some of the world's most famous brands, from humble beginnings to current exalted status, from smudged, kitchen-table pamphlets to $ multi-million ad campaigns, from backyard experiments to global research. It examines the most recent developments in these glittering trajectories and reveals the very DNA of the brands themselves. Is it mastery of absorbency, the virtuoso integration of acquisitions, developing incomparable consumer trust, the ability to think in decades? All is revealed. If you work in Retail, FMCG, Marketing or Consumer Goods, this is a must–read book.

Keywords: FMCG , History, Manufactures, Brands, Innovation, Global, Consumer, Retail, Market, Emerging Markets, Coke, Colgate-Palmolive, Danone, Dean Foods, Estée Lauder, General Mills, Heinz, Henkel, Kellog, Kimberly-Clark, Kraft, L'Oréal, Mars, Nestlé, Procter & Gamble, Pepsi, Reckitt Benckiser, Unilever
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About the author

Greg Thain 

Business. Over 40 years' experience of developing businesses, multiple fund raising and public flotations. Experience in marketing, market research, internet/tech, real estate, investment property funds, publishing and consultancy with a focus for the last 22 years on the emerging markets.

Real Estate. Russian real estate involvement over the past 22 years. Introduced the first significant international bank loan of $500M to a Russian developer in 1995. Took the founder of Raven Russia to Moscow, helping raise the initial $300m/purchase initial industrial site/project for $74m. In 2007/8 organised a property investment fund of $180m.

Lecturing and Public Speaking. Frequent speaker throughout Europe and Asia on markets, retail, internet and other developments across these sectors. Keynote speaker at the first HP conference for 5 years in Asia (Macau, autumn 2013). Presented Key Trends in Internet and Retail Worldwide to the leading 450 retailers in Asia/Greater China.

Books. Storewars. The Battle for Mindspace and Shelfspace, written and published in 2012. The Power of Fast-moving Consumer Goods, a history of the world's 18 leading consumer-facing companies, written and published in May 2014. E-Retail. Zero Friction in the Digital Universe, due to launch in July 2014.

Magazine Publishing. Developed a number of original products in the 1980s and 90s: What Mortgage magazine, the original mortgage advice magazine, What Investment, What Finance, What Video, and Popular Video at the forefront of the video revolution. In excess of 20 newspapers, magazines and journals including The British Investors Database, the original compilation of all investors in the UK. Launched the original Local Radio Awards, first awards to the UK local radio industry.


John Bradley

John Bradley held international marketing positions in Cadbury for 24 years before becoming a consultant and writer. John has authored two business histories, Cadbury's Purple Reign, and Fry's Chocolate Dream, and co-authored along with Greg Thain an update of the book Store Wars. John now lives and works in Canada.

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Additional Information

Publisher
First Edition Design Pub.
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Published on
Jul 11, 2014
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Pages
550
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ISBN
9781622876471
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Language
English
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Genres
Business & Economics / International / Marketing
Business & Economics / Marketing / General
Business & Economics / Marketing / Research
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Available on Android devices
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Eligible for Family Library

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Why we choose companies and brands in the same way that we unconsciously perceive, judge, and behave toward one another

People everywhere describe their relationships with brands in a deeply personal way—we hate our banks, love our smartphones, and think the cable company is out to get us. What's actually going on in our brains when we make these judgments? Through original research, customer loyalty expert Chris Malone and top social psychologist Susan Fiske discovered that our perceptions arise from spontaneous judgments on warmth and competence, the same two factors that also determine our impressions of people. We see companies and brands the same way we automatically perceive, judge, and behave toward one another. As a result, to achieve sustained success, companies must forge genuine relationships with customers. And as customers, we have a right to expect relational accountability from the companies and brands we support.

Applies the social psychology concepts of "warmth" (what intentions others have toward us) and "competence" (how capable they are of carrying out those intentions) to the way we perceive and relate to companies and brands Features in-depth analyses of companies such as Hershey's, Domino's, Lululemon, Zappos, Amazon, Chobani, Sprint, and more Draws from original research, evaluating over 45 companies over the course of 10 separate studies

The Human Brand is essential reading for understanding how and why we make the choices we do, as well as what it takes for companies and brands to earn and keep our loyalty in the digital age.

Although one perspective depicts young consumers as vulnerable and passive in the marketplace system, our knowledge of this consumer group will be inadequate if limited to this contention. Their roles and relevance in family consumption activities are becoming increasingly profound. Available evidence shows that they cannot be ignored in the marketplace dynamics as they consume goods and services in their households and are involved in various other active roles in their household consumption including making decisions where applicable. Hence, the landscape of young consumer behaviour is changing.

Young Consumer Behaviour: A Research Companion

focusses on exploring the behaviour of young consumers as individuals and societal members. The chapters address different aspects of consumption activities of children as individuals like motivation, involvement, perception, learning, attitude, the self, and personality. Similarly, chapters on consumer behaviour in social settings contextualised to young consumers including culture, sub-culture, family, and groups are incorporated into the book. This book fills a gap in the literature by addressing the dynamics of consumption patterns of this consumer group, in relation to various marketing stimuli and different stakeholders. It combines eclectic perspectives on the topic and specifically, bridges the gap between historical perspectives and contemporary issues.

Building on the extant literature in the field of marketing and consumer behaviour, this book is a compendium of research materials and constitutes an essential reference source on young consumer behaviour issues with both academic and managerial implications.

In one of the most original books of its kind ever written, Patrick Hanlon explains how the most powerful brands create a community of believers around the brand, revealing the seven components that will help every company and marketer capture the public imagination -- and seize a bigger slice of the pie.

What is the magic glue that adheres consumers to Google, Mini Cooper, and Oprah, but not to others? Why do many brands with great product innovation, perfect locations, terrific customer experiences, even breakthrough advertising fail to get the same visceral traction in the marketplace that brands like Apple, Starbucks, or Nike have? After years of working with famous brands like Absolut, Ford Motor Company, LEGO, Disney, Montblanc, Sara Lee, and others, Patrick Hanlon, senior advertising executive and founder of Thinktopia, decided to find the answers. His search revealed seven definable assets that together construct the belief system that lies behind every successful brand, whether it's a product, service, city, personality, social cause, or movement.

In Primal branding, Hanlon explores those seven components, known as the primal code, and shows how to use and combine them to create a community of believers in which the consumer develops a powerful emotional attachment to the brand. These techniques work for everyone involved in creating and selling an image -- from marketing managers to social advocates to business leaders seeking to increase customer preference for new or existing products. Primal branding presents a world of new possibility for everyone trying to spark public appeal -- and the opportunity to move from being just another product on the shelf to becoming a desired and necessary part of the culture.
Improve your grasp of contemporary European marketing issues with these fascinating case studies and analyses!

From the editor:
Europe is not a homogenous mass market. It is rather a heterogeneous market with substantial regional, country, and individual market differences. There are three major sub-markets: European Union (EU) countries, European Free Trade Area (EFTA) countries, and Eastern/Central European (ECE) countries (accession countries). Ten of these countries joined the EU on May 1st, 2004. These countries offer tremendous market opportunities for other European countries, as there is a strong demand in these ten countries for various products and services. Very soon, we will be witnessing the emergence of an enlarged Europe with high market and investment potential.

This resource examines marketing practices and consumer behavior in several EU countries, plus one EFTA country and one Associate EU member country. With conceptual frameworks, case studies, analytical insights into European marketing issues, empirical data, and propositions for future testing, European Perspectives in Marketing presents clear, understandable writing on:
outsourcing industrial products from Eastern and Central European suppliers
cross-cultural differences in the effect of advertising repetition and size—with a case study from Germany
the internationalization of small high-tech firms—with case examples from Norway
the impact of the euro on Italian consumers’ currency adjustment strategies—have they successfully adapted to the new currency by substituting their old internal price references (based on the high-denomination lira) with a new set of references that reflects the low-denomination currency of the euro?
international antitrust strategies and the policies of Pepsi and Coke in Europe as compared to in the United States—and a look at the managerial and public policy implications of US and EU antitrust regulations
recent advances in Information & Communication Technology (ICT) and how they can reduce the communication barriers between and within geographically dispersed organizations
why young Turkish adults (high school and university students, and young people in the workforce) purchase and use mobile telephones for symbolic rather than practical reasons
A unique expose of the Cadbury story, providing an unprecedented insight into the makings of an iconic brand.

Cadbury's Puple Reign for the first time tells the in-depth story and definitive history of the Cadbury brand, and how it came to be the world's pre-eminent chocolate brand. It presents a no holds barred account of the rollercoaster ride the organization has experienced that has, ultimately, led to its success. It is a story of endurance, where, in the UK, Cadbury is a clear market leader.

This fascinating journey that has been the history of Cadbury makes it an ideal example with which to illuminate the story of consumerism. The company was established even before there were a mass of consumers to sell to, and was at the forefront of many of the developments which facilitated the rise of mass markets:

Putting product quality at the heart of the brand. Harnessing the miracles of the Industrial and Transportation Revolutions to drive explosive growth Industry consolidation via mergers and acquisitions to cement critical mass A radical approach to harnessing the potential of its workforce to create the most effectively run company in Britain The virtuous circle of economies of scale which slashed prices and brought chocolate to the masses Innovative marketing and selling approaches that put the Cadbury brand into not just the minds of consumers, but their hearts.

Illustrated with fact, anecdote and beautiful images from previously archived material, this book provides the reader with an unprecedented insight into one of the world’s most iconic brands. These insights will help any consumer business that aspire to build longevity for their brand with lessons on how to better endear itself to consumers, and how to turn that relationship into profitable sales.

The book has the full backing from Cadbury and chairman Sir John Sunderland provides the foreword.

"Explores how industry has manipulated our most deep-seated survival instincts."—David Perlmutter, MD, Author, #1 New York Times bestseller, Grain Brain and Brain Maker

The New York Times–bestselling author of Fat Chance reveals the corporate scheme to sell pleasure, driving the international epidemic of addiction, depression, and chronic disease.
 
While researching the toxic and addictive properties of sugar for his New York Times bestseller Fat Chance, Robert Lustig made an alarming discovery—our pursuit of happiness is being subverted by a culture of addiction and depression from which we may never recover.
           
Dopamine is the “reward” neurotransmitter that tells our brains we want more; yet every substance or behavior that releases dopamine in the extreme leads to addiction. Serotonin is the “contentment” neurotransmitter that tells our brains we don’t need any more; yet its deficiency leads to depression. Ideally, both are in optimal supply. Yet dopamine evolved to overwhelm serotonin—because our ancestors were more likely to survive if they were constantly motivated—with the result that constant desire can chemically destroy our ability to feel happiness, while sending us down the slippery slope to addiction. In the last forty years, government legislation and subsidies have promoted ever-available temptation (sugar, drugs, social media, porn) combined with constant stress (work, home, money, Internet), with the end result of an unprecedented epidemic of addiction, anxiety, depression, and chronic disease. And with the advent of neuromarketing, corporate America has successfully imprisoned us in an endless loop of desire and consumption from which there is no obvious escape.
           
With his customary wit and incisiveness, Lustig not only reveals the science that drives these states of mind, he points his finger directly at the corporations that helped create this mess, and the government actors who facilitated it, and he offers solutions we can all use in the pursuit of happiness, even in the face of overwhelming opposition. Always fearless and provocative, Lustig marshals a call to action, with seminal implications for our health, our well-being, and our culture.
The indispensable classic on marketing by the bestselling author of Tribes and Purple Cow.

Legendary business writer Seth Godin has three essential questions for every marketer:

“What’s your story?”

“Will the people who need to hear this story believe it?”

“Is it true?”

All marketers tell stories. And if they do it right, we believe them. We believe that wine tastes better in a $20 glass than a $1 glass. We believe that an $80,000 Porsche is vastly superior to a $36,000 Volkswagen that’s virtually the same car. We believe that $225 sneakers make our feet feel better—and look cooler—than a $25 brand. And believing it makes it true.

As Seth Godin has taught hundreds of thousands of marketers and students around the world, great marketers don’t talk about features or even benefits. Instead, they tell a story—a story we want to believe, whether it’s factual or not. In a world where most people have an infinite number of choices and no time to make them, every organization is a marketer, and all marketing is about telling stories.

Marketers succeed when they tell us a story that fits our worldview, a story that we intuitively embrace and then share with our friends. Think of the Dyson vacuum cleaner, or Fiji water, or the iPod.

But beware: If your stories are inauthentic, you cross the line from fib to fraud. Marketers fail when they are selfish and scurrilous, when they abuse the tools of their trade and make the world worse. That’s a lesson learned the hard way by telemarketers, cigarette companies, and sleazy politicians.

But for the rest of us, it’s time to embrace the power of the story. As Godin writes, “Stories make it easier to understand the world. Stories are the only way we know to spread an idea. Marketers didn’t invent storytelling. They just perfected it.”
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