The Bowery Boys: Adventures in Old New York: An Unconventional Exploration of Manhattan's Historic Neighborhoods, Secret Spots and Colorful Characters

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The Bowery Boys' official companion to their wildly popular, award-winning podcast It was 2007. Sitting at a kitchen table and speaking into an old karaoke microphone, Greg Young and Tom Meyers recorded their first podcast. They weren't history professors or voice actors. They were just two guys living in the Bowery and possessing an unquenchable thirst for the fascinating stories from New York City's past. Nearly 200 episodes later, The Bowery Boys podcast is a phenomenon, thrilling audiences each month with one amazing story after the next. Now, in their first-ever book, the duo gives you an exclusive personal tour through New York's old cobblestone streets and gas-lit back alleyways. In their uniquely approachable style, the authors bring to life everything from makeshift forts of the early Dutch years to the opulent mansions of The Gilded Age. They weave tales that will reshape your view of famous sites like Times Square, Grand Central Terminal, and the High Line. Then they go even further to reveal notorious dens of vice, scandalous Jazz Age crime scenes, and park statues with strange pasts.
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About the author

Greg Young is one of the co-founders of the incredibly popular New York City history podcast, The Bowery Boys. He lives in New York City.

Tom Meyers is one of the co-founders of the incredibly popular New York City history podcast, The Bowery Boys. He lives in New York City.
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Additional Information

Publisher
Ulysses Press
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Published on
Apr 18, 2016
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Pages
528
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ISBN
9781612435763
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Language
English
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Genres
Architecture / Buildings / Landmarks & Monuments
History / United States / 19th Century
History / United States / State & Local / Middle Atlantic (DC, DE, MD, NJ, NY, PA)
Travel / United States / Northeast / Middle Atlantic (NJ, NY, PA)
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Available on Android devices
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Includes walking tours throughout Manhattan, Brooklyn, and the Bronx
• the Financial District
• the World Trade Center 
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• Chelsea and the High Line
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Praise for Magnetic City

“An intimate, seductive guidebook.”—The New York Times

“An enthralling new book makes clear that I’m not alone in my home-town infatuation . . . lends nuance, texture and historical perspective to my impression that New York City has never been so appealing or life-affirming as it is today.”—New York Post

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“Mr. Davidson’s exceptional knowledge of our beloved city is inspiring. Magnetic City is now my official chaperone.”—Patti LuPone

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“Justin Davidson’s beautiful tours of New York City invoke and redouble our love of the metropolis.”—Jerry Saltz, senior art critic, New York
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