Some We Love, Some We Hate, Some We Eat: Why It's So Hard to Think Straight About Animals

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“Everybody who is interested in the ethics of our relationship between humans and animals should read this book.”
—Temple Grandin, author of Animals Make Us Human

 

Hal Herzog, a maverick scientist and leader in the field of anthrozoology offers a controversial, thought-provoking, and unprecedented exploration of the psychology behind the inconsistent and often paradoxical ways we think, feel, and behave towards animals. A cross between Michael Pollan’s The Omnivore’s Dilemma and Bill Bryson’s A Walk in the Woods, Some We Love, Some We Hate, Some We Eat, in the words of Irene M. Pepperberg, bestselling author of Alex & Me,deftly blends anecdote with scientific research to show how almost any moral or ethical position regarding our relationship with animals can lead to absurd consequences.”

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About the author

Hal Herzog is recognized as one of the world’s leading anthrozoologists. He is a professor of psychology at Western Carolina University and lives in the Great Smoky Mountains with his wife Mary Jean.

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3.7
464 total
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Additional Information

Publisher
Harper Collins
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Published on
Sep 7, 2010
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Pages
368
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ISBN
9780062010704
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Features
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Language
English
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Genres
Social Science / General
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Eligible for Family Library

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