Salt Houses

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“Reading Salt Houses is like having your coffee grounds read: cosmic, foreboding and titillating all at once. In this magnificent debut, Alyan’s powerful and poetic voice guides us into the dark recesses of history and leads us right up to the present tensions between East & West, the modern & ancestral, the hopeless and the hopeful.” 
—Aline Ohanesian, author of Orhan's Inheritance

On the eve of her daughter Alia’s wedding, Salma reads the girl’s future in a cup of coffee dregs. She sees an unsettled life for Alia and her children; she also sees travel, and luck. While she chooses to keep her predictions to herself that day, they will all soon come to pass when the family is uprooted in the wake of the Six-Day War of 1967. 

Salma is forced to leave her home in Nablus; Alia’s brother gets pulled into a politically militarized world he can’t escape; and Alia and her gentle-spirited husband move to Kuwait City, where they reluctantly build a life with their three children. When Saddam Hussein invades Kuwait in 1990, Alia and her family once again lose their home, their land, and their story as they know it, scattering to Beirut, Paris, Boston, and beyond. Soon Alia’s children begin families of their own, once again navigating the burdens (and blessings) of assimilation in foreign cities. 

Lyrical and heartbreaking, Salt Houses is a remarkable debut novel that challenges and humanizes an age-old conflict we might think we understand—one that asks us to confront that most devastating of all truths: you can’t go home again. 
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About the author

HALA ALYAN is an award-winning Palestinian American poet and clinical psychologist whose work has appeared in numerous journals including the Missouri ReviewPrairie Schooner, and Colorado Review. She lives in New York.

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Reviews

4.5
4 total
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Additional Information

Publisher
Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
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Published on
May 2, 2017
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Pages
320
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ISBN
9780544912380
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Language
English
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Genres
Fiction / Literary
Fiction / Sagas
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Available on Android devices
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Eligible for Family Library

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Gail Honeyman
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