Forest Entomology in East Africa: Forest Insects of Tanzania

Springer Science & Business Media
Free sample

East African forests, among the world’s most biologically rich and diverse, are subject to multiple pressures, including insects. As the first work to focus exclusively on East African forest insects, this monograph distils 135 years of scientific and historical literature extending from before the colonial era to the present into an authoritative survey of this region’s major pests of trees and wood, as well as their antagonists. This comprehensive treatise also addresses insects of social and economic importance, such as endemics, edible and collectible insects, wild bees and silk producers. It should be of great value to foresters, entomologists, conservation biologists, resource managers, safari outfitters and anyone else interested in the natural history of this fascinating region.
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Additional Information

Publisher
Springer Science & Business Media
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Published on
Sep 13, 2006
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Pages
328
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ISBN
9781402046551
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Language
English
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Genres
Science / Life Sciences / Horticulture
Science / Life Sciences / Zoology / Entomology
Science / Life Sciences / Zoology / General
Technology & Engineering / Agriculture / Forestry
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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This volume offers extensive information on insect life in dying and dead wood. Written and reviewed by leading experts from around the world, the twenty-five chapters included here provide the most global coverage possible and specifically address less-studied taxa and topics. An overarching goal of this work is to unite literature that has become fragmented along taxonomic and geographic lines. A particular effort was made to recognize the dominant roles that social insects (e.g., termites, ants and passalid beetles) play in saproxylic assemblages in many parts of the world without overlooking the non-social members of these communities.

The book is divided into four parts:

· Part I “Diversity” includes chapters addressing the major orders of saproxylic insects (Coleoptera, Diptera, Hymenoptera, Hemiptera, Lepidoptera and Blattodea), broadly organized in decreasing order of estimated global saproxylic diversity. In addition to order-level treatments, some chapters in this part discuss groups of particular interest, including pollinators, hymenopteran parasitoids, ants, stag and passalid beetles, and wood-feeding termites.

· Part II “Ecology” discusses insect-fungal and insect-insect interactions, nutritional ecology, dispersal, seasonality, and vertical stratification.

· Part III “Conservation” focuses on the importance of primary forests for saproxylic insects, offers recommendations for conserving these organisms in managed forests, discusses the relationships between saproxylic insects and fire, and addresses the value of tree hollows and highly-decomposed wood for saproxylic insects. Utilization of non-native wood by saproxylic insects and the suitability of urban environments for these organisms are also covered.

· Lastly, Part IV “Methodological Advancements” highlights molecular tools for assessing saproxylic diversity.

The book offers an accessible and insightful resource for natural historians of all kinds and will especially appeal to entomologists, ecologists, conservationists and foresters.

The book that helped make Michael Pollan, the New York Times bestselling author of Cooked and The Omnivore’s Dilemma, one of the most trusted food experts in America

In 1637, one Dutchman paid as much for a single tulip bulb as the going price of a town house in Amsterdam. Three and a half centuries later, Amsterdam is once again the mecca for people who care passionately about one particular plant—though this time the obsessions revolves around the intoxicating effects of marijuana rather than the visual beauty of the tulip. How could flowers, of all things, become such objects of desire that they can drive men to financial ruin?

In The Botany of Desire, Michael Pollan argues that the answer lies at the heart of the intimately reciprocal relationship between people and plants. In telling the stories of four familiar plant species that are deeply woven into the fabric of our lives, Pollan illustrates how they evolved to satisfy humankinds’s most basic yearnings—and by doing so made themselves indispensable. For, just as we’ve benefited from these plants, the plants, in the grand co-evolutionary scheme that Pollan evokes so brilliantly, have done well by us. The sweetness of apples, for example, induced the early Americans to spread the species, giving the tree a whole new continent in which to blossom. So who is really domesticating whom?

Weaving fascinating anecdotes and accessible science into gorgeous prose, Pollan takes us on an absorbing journey that will change the way we think about our place in nature.
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