The United States Occupation of Haiti, 1915-1934

Rutgers University Press
2
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"A good history of a sordid intervention that submitted a people to autocratic rule and did little for economic development." --The New York Times "From Schmidt we get the full details . . . of the brutal racist practices inflicted on the Haitians for nearly all of the nineteen-year American presence in the country." --American Historical Review "The only thoroughgoing study of one of the more discreditable American interventions overseas." --Journal of Interdisciplinary History "Should become the standard work on the subject. . . .required reading for specialists in Caribbean studies and U.S.-Latin American relations." --
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About the author

Hans Schmidt taught form many years at the State University of New York at New Paltz. He now teaches at the University of Hong Kong.
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4.5
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Additional Information

Publisher
Rutgers University Press
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Published on
Dec 31, 1995
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Pages
303
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ISBN
9780813522036
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Language
English
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Genres
History / Caribbean & West Indies / General
History / General
History / United States / 20th Century
History / World
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Content Protection
This content is DRM free.
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In his inaugural address, President John F. Kennedy challenged Americans to do something for their country. Thousands of young people answered his call, launching an era of flourishing social activism that eclipsed any in U.S. history. Citizens rallied behind an endless variety of social justice organizations to change the country’s social and political landscape. As these social movements gained momentum, the severe poverty of the Appalachian region attracted the attention of many spirited young Americans. In 1964, a group of them formed the Appalachian Volunteers, an organization intent on eradicating poverty in eastern Kentucky and the rest of the Southern mountains. In Reformers to Radicals: The Appalachian Volunteers and the War on Poverty, Thomas Kiffmeyer documents the history of this organization as their youthful enthusiasm led to radicalism and controversy. Known informally as the AVs, these reformers sought to improve the everyday lives of the Appalachian poor while also making strides toward lasting economic change in the region. Considering themselves “poverty warriors,” the AVs helped residents by refurbishing schools and homes and by offering much-needed educational opportunities, including job training and remedial academic instruction. Their efforts brought temporary relief to the Appalachian poor, but controversy was soon to follow. Within two years of the group’s formation, they faced nationwide accusations that they were “seditious” and “un-American.” Kiffmeyer explains how these activists, who worked for a worthy cause, ignited a firestorm of public criticism that ultimately caused their mission to fail. Before the decade was over, the Volunteers had lost the support of the federal and state governments and of many Appalachian people—an irreversible setback that caused the group to disband in 1970. The Appalachian Volunteers’ failure was caused by multiple factors. They were overtly political, attracting divisive reactions from local and state governments. They were indecisive in defining the true nature of their cause, creating dissension within the group’s ranks. They were engaged in a struggle to “integrate” the poor into mainstream American culture, which alienated the AVs from many of the very people they sought to help. They were also caught up in the unrest of the civil rights and anti–Vietnam War movements, which distracted them from their core mission. Reformers to Radicals chronicles a critical era in Appalachian history while also investigating the impact the 1960s’ reform attitude had on one part of a broader movement in the United States. Kiffmeyer revisits an era in which idealistic young Americans, spurred on by President Kennedy’s call to action, set out to remake America.
NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER • NAMED ONE OF THE BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR BY CHICAGO TRIBUNE • A thrilling adventure of danger and deep-sea diving, historic mystery and suspense, by the author of Shadow Divers

Finding and identifying a pirate ship is the hardest thing to do under the sea. But two men—John Chatterton and John Mattera—are willing to risk everything to find the Golden Fleece, the ship of the infamous pirate Joseph Bannister. At large during the Golden Age of Piracy in the seventeenth century, Bannister should have been immortalized in the lore of the sea—his exploits more notorious than Blackbeard’s, more daring than Kidd’s. But his story, and his ship, have been lost to time. If Chatterton and Mattera succeed, they will make history—it will be just the second time ever that a pirate ship has been discovered and positively identified. Soon, however, they realize that cutting-edge technology and a willingness to lose everything aren’t enough to track down Bannister’s ship. They must travel the globe in search of historic documents and accounts of the great pirate’s exploits, face down dangerous rivals, battle the tides of nations and governments and experts. But it’s only when they learn to think and act like pirates—like Bannister—that they become able to go where no pirate hunters have gone before.

Fast-paced and filled with suspense, fascinating characters, history, and adventure, Pirate Hunters is an unputdownable story that goes deep to discover truths and souls long believed lost.

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“A great thriller full of tough guys and long odds . . . and: It’s all true.”—Lee Child


From the Hardcover edition.
The powerful, untold story of the 1950 revolution in Puerto Rico and the long history of U.S. intervention on the island, that the New York Times says "could not be more timely."In 1950, after over fifty years of military occupation and colonial rule, the Nationalist Party of Puerto Rico staged an unsuccessful armed insurrection against the United States. Violence swept through the island: assassins were sent to kill President Harry Truman, gunfights roared in eight towns, police stations and post offices were burned down. In order to suppress this uprising, the US Army deployed thousands of troops and bombarded two towns, marking the first time in history that the US government bombed its own citizens.

Nelson A. Denis tells this powerful story through the controversial life of Pedro Albizu Campos, who served as the president of the Nationalist Party. A lawyer, chemical engineer, and the first Puerto Rican to graduate from Harvard Law School, Albizu Campos was imprisoned for twenty-five years and died under mysterious circumstances. By tracing his life and death, Denis shows how the journey of Albizu Campos is part of a larger story of Puerto Rico and US colonialism.

Through oral histories, personal interviews, eyewitness accounts, congressional testimony, and recently declassified FBI files, War Against All Puerto Ricans tells the story of a forgotten revolution and its context in Puerto Rico's history, from the US invasion in 1898 to the modern-day struggle for self-determination. Denis provides an unflinching account of the gunfights, prison riots, political intrigue, FBI and CIA covert activity, and mass hysteria that accompanied this tumultuous period in Puerto Rican history.
In his inaugural address, President John F. Kennedy challenged Americans to do something for their country. Thousands of young people answered his call, launching an era of flourishing social activism that eclipsed any in U.S. history. Citizens rallied behind an endless variety of social justice organizations to change the country’s social and political landscape. As these social movements gained momentum, the severe poverty of the Appalachian region attracted the attention of many spirited young Americans. In 1964, a group of them formed the Appalachian Volunteers, an organization intent on eradicating poverty in eastern Kentucky and the rest of the Southern mountains. In Reformers to Radicals: The Appalachian Volunteers and the War on Poverty, Thomas Kiffmeyer documents the history of this organization as their youthful enthusiasm led to radicalism and controversy. Known informally as the AVs, these reformers sought to improve the everyday lives of the Appalachian poor while also making strides toward lasting economic change in the region. Considering themselves “poverty warriors,” the AVs helped residents by refurbishing schools and homes and by offering much-needed educational opportunities, including job training and remedial academic instruction. Their efforts brought temporary relief to the Appalachian poor, but controversy was soon to follow. Within two years of the group’s formation, they faced nationwide accusations that they were “seditious” and “un-American.” Kiffmeyer explains how these activists, who worked for a worthy cause, ignited a firestorm of public criticism that ultimately caused their mission to fail. Before the decade was over, the Volunteers had lost the support of the federal and state governments and of many Appalachian people—an irreversible setback that caused the group to disband in 1970. The Appalachian Volunteers’ failure was caused by multiple factors. They were overtly political, attracting divisive reactions from local and state governments. They were indecisive in defining the true nature of their cause, creating dissension within the group’s ranks. They were engaged in a struggle to “integrate” the poor into mainstream American culture, which alienated the AVs from many of the very people they sought to help. They were also caught up in the unrest of the civil rights and anti–Vietnam War movements, which distracted them from their core mission. Reformers to Radicals chronicles a critical era in Appalachian history while also investigating the impact the 1960s’ reform attitude had on one part of a broader movement in the United States. Kiffmeyer revisits an era in which idealistic young Americans, spurred on by President Kennedy’s call to action, set out to remake America.
Die Stadt Nürnberg ist im Schockzustand. Auf der Fleischbrücke wird im Morgengrauen eine blutüberströmte Leiche gefunden. Hauptkommissar Wolff Schmitt und seine Ehefrau Oberkommissarin Ilse Merkel müssen den Mord ausgerechnet in ihrer Hochzeitsnacht entdecken. Die Polizei steht vor einem Rätsel, denn es finden sich weder verwertbare Spuren, noch kann der Tote identifiziert werden. Der öffentliche Druck ist enorm. Da geschieht ein zweiter Mord. Es kommt der Verdacht auf, dass es sich bei dem Täter um einen Psychopathen handeln könnte, der brutal, ritualartig, aber auch eiskalt berechnend vorgeht. Und es wächst die Angst in der Stadt, dass es weitere Morde geben könnte. Die Angst ist berechtigt und der Fall fordert jetzt die ganze Kraft der Mordkommission. - Autor Gerd Hans Schmidt, 1960 geborener echter Franke, ist seit 1995 Rechtsanwalt in eigener Kanzlei. Er wohnt und arbeitet bei Erlangen. Die kreative Seite trat schon während des Studiums der Rechtswissenschaften in Erlangen zu Tage. Das trockene Studium lockerte er nebenbei mit semiprofessioneller Musik (Neue Deutsche Welle) auf und er arbeitete 1988/89 kurz für eine lokale Zeitung als Redakteur. Es gab eine ganze Reihe rechtlicher Publikationen in lokalen Blättern und zu Anfang der beruflichen Tätigkeit eine kleine Radiosendung bei einem Lokalsender. Seit 2011 macht der Autor als »HansBass« auch wieder Rockmusik in einer Band. Die Idee für den ersten Roman »Mord in der Harrer-Klinik« ergab sich während eines Klinikaufenthaltes. Die Geschichte des zweiten Krimis »Zuckerrübenmord« führt in die Welt der Politik mit ihren Schattenseiten wie Betrug und Korruption. Beide Krimis sind ebenfalls im Engelsdorfer Verlag Leipzig erschienen.
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