John Leighton Stuart’s Political Career in China

Routledge
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In China, John Leighton Stuart (1876-1962) is a controversial figure occupying an important position in the history of modern China and Sino-U.S. relations. As a scholar and educator, Stuart loved Chinese culture and contributed much to the development of Chinese education. While as a missionary, he was inherently prejudiced against Marxism. As the U.S. ambassador to China, Stuart executed U.S. government's policy, and was finally stereotyped as a symbol of "American imperialism".

This book gives a detailed account of Stuart's complicated and deep political involvement in modern China. Stuart had close relationships with Chiang Kai-shek and other high-ranking officials of Kuomingtang (KMT), while he was also an honored guest of Mao Tse-tung and Chinese Communist Party (CCP). During his tenure as the U.S. Ambassador to China, Stuart did implement U.S. government's policy of supporting KMT. But when the CCP's gaining power became inevitable, he took a pragmatic attitude and urged the U.S. government to normalize its diplomatic relations with the Communist Government. These seemingly contradictory behaviors reveal Stuart's complex features and the changeable era.

By collecting substantial relevant materials both at home and abroad, both published and unpublished, this book reveals Stuart's multidimensional characters, getting rid of the stereotype. Academic and general readers interested in Stuart, modern Chinese history and Sino-U.S. relations will be attracted by this book.

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About the author

Hao Ping earned his Master's degree in history from University of Hawaii and Doctorate in International Relations from Peking University. His publications include Sun Yat-sen and America (Foreign Language Teaching and Research Press, 2012), etc.

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Additional Information

Publisher
Routledge
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Published on
Aug 7, 2017
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Pages
228
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ISBN
9781351666022
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Best For
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Language
English
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Genres
Biography & Autobiography / Educators
Biography & Autobiography / General
Biography & Autobiography / Historical
Biography & Autobiography / Political
Biography & Autobiography / Religious
History / Asia / China
History / General
History / Modern / 20th Century
Political Science / International Relations / General
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This content is DRM protected.
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