Southern Cultures: The Fifteenth Anniversary Reader

Univ of North Carolina Press
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What does "redneck" mean? What's going to happen to the southern accent? What makes black southerners laugh? What is "real" country music? These are the kinds of questions that pop up in this collection of notable essays from Southern Cultures, the journal of the Center for the Study of the American South at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Intentionally plural, Southern Cultures was founded in 1993 to present all sides of the American South, from sorority sisters to Pocahontas, from kudzu to the blues.

This volume collects 27 essays from the journal's first fifteen years, bringing together some of the most memorable and engaging essays as well as some of those most requested for use in courses. A stellar cast of contributors discusses themes of identity, pride, traditions, changes, conflicts, and stereotypes. Topics range from black migrants in Chicago to Mexican immigrants in North Carolina, from Tennessee wrestlers to Martin Luther King, from the Civil War to contemporary debates about the Confederate flag. Funny and serious, historical and contemporary, the collection offers something new for every South-watcher, with fresh perspectives on enduring debates about the people and cultures of America's most complex region.

Contributors:
Derek H. Alderman, East Carolina University
Donna G'Segner Alderman, Greenville, North Carolina
S. Jonathan Bass, Samford University
Dwight B. Billings, University of Kentucky
Catherine W. Bishir, Preservation North Carolina
Kathleen M. Blee, University of Pittsburgh
Elizabeth Boyd, Vanderbilt University
James C. Cobb, University of Georgia
Peter A. Coclanis, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Joseph Crespino, Emory University
Drew Gilpin Faust, Harvard University
franklin forts, University of Georgia
David Goldfield, University of North Carolina at Charlotte
Larry J. Griffin, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Adam Gussow, University of Mississippi
Trudier Harris, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Patrick Huber, University of Missouri-Rolla
Louis M. Kyriakoudes, University of Southern Mississippi
Melton McLaurin, University of North Carolina at Wilmington
Michael Montgomery, University of South Carolina
Steve Oney, Los Angeles, California
Theda Perdue, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Dan Pierce, University of North Carolina at Asheville
John Shelton Reed, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Mart Stewart, Western Washington University
Thomas A. Tweed, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Timothy B. Tyson, Duke University
Anthony Walton, Bowdoin College
Harry L. Watson, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Charles Reagan Wilson, University of Mississippi
C. Vann Woodward (1908-1999)



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About the author

Harry L. Watson is director of the Center for the Study of the American South and professor of history at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He is cofounder, with John Shelton Reed, of Southern Cultures.

Larry J. Griffin is John Shelton Reed Distinguished Professor of Sociology and professor of history at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Watson and Griffin are coeditors of Southern Cultures.

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Additional Information

Publisher
Univ of North Carolina Press
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Published on
Apr 28, 2008
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Pages
528
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ISBN
9780807886465
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Features
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Language
English
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Genres
History / United States / State & Local / South (AL, AR, FL, GA, KY, LA, MS, NC, SC, TN, VA, WV)
Social Science / Sociology / General
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Harry L. Watson
This Omnibus E-book brings together all four issues of Southern Cultures Volume 15, published in 2009.

Volume 15 of Southern Cultures explores Lee's Tomb, how Southern evangelicals kept sin from sacred spaces, the power of memorials, W.E.B. Du Bois's unusual connection to the United Daughters of the Confederacy, sundown towns, the African American architect who designed one of the South's elite institutions during Jim Crow, and both the Mississippi Delta and Core Sound Workboats in photographs.

It also includes two theme issues with multimedia content, "The Edible South" and "Music." "The Edible South," our first food issue, includes the favorite foods of our favorite writers, Drum Head Stew from the Eastern Shore of Virginia, girls' tomato clubs, Wormsloe plantation, select short films on food from our friends at the Southern Foodways Alliance on the bonus DVD, and more. Our Fall special issue is our third music issue includes a never-before-published interview with "Son" Thomas, a brief history of the boogie, Ella May Wiggins, Top Ten best of jazz, blues, country, and rock greats, Emmett Till in music and song, and more.

Enhanced with the 20 music tracks from the bonus CD, "Cool-Water Music," it brings together yet another eclectic mix of folk, blues, country, and alternative rock, from Pete Seeger to Whistlin' Britches to Charlie Louvin and George Jones to the Rosebuds. A feast!

Southern Cultures is published quarterly (spring, summer, fall, winter) by the University of North Carolina Press. The journal is sponsored by the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill's Center for the Study of the American South.

Harry L. Watson
Southern Cultures Volume 20: Number 1 – Summer 2014

Table of Contents

Front Porch
by Jocelyn R. Neal
"One of the challenges—and, simultaneously, deep pleasures—of studying the South is that the disciplinary walls of the academy neither contain nor constrain the work."

Rewriting Elizabeth
A Life Lost (and Found) in the Annals of Bryce Mental Hospital
by Lindsay Byron
"Her name was never to be spoken. Even upon the lips and within the hearts of her own children, remembrance was forbidden. Silence nearly erased her from history."

Ghosts, Wreckers, and Rotten Ties
The 1891 Train Wreck at Bostian's Bridge
by Scott Huffard
"When train number nine on the Western North Carolina Railroad tumbled off Bostian's Bridge in 1891, it ignited a media frenzy, as well as a firestorm of outrage, a detailed investigation, a compelling mystery, and a series of unanswered questions."

Photo Essay
Teenage Pastime
by Natalie Minik
"When the unlimited energy of adolescence comes to bear on the limited experience of childhood, the results often swing toward one of two poles—an enthusiastic confirmation of the culture a child grew into or a bold rejection of the culture they grew out of."

"The Best Notes Made the Most Votes"
W. C. Handy, E. H. Crump, and Black Music as Politics
by Mark A. Johnson
"'Feet commenced to pat. A moment later there was dancing on the sidewalks below. Hands went into the air, bodies swayed like the reeds on the banks of the Congo.'"

Taking Strong Drink
by Bill Koon
"Some devout Baptists complained that there was too much booze in a mini bottle for one drink; the rest of us complained that there wasn't enough."

South Polls
Partisan Change in Southern State Legislatures, 1953–2013
by Christopher A. Cooper and H. Gibbs Knotts
"At mid-century, the South had no Republican senators and only two Republicans in the 105-person southern House delegation. By 2000, [both] delegations were majority Republican."

Beyond Grits and Gravy
Maggie and Buck
Coal Camps, Cabbage Rolls, and Community in Appalachia
by Donna Tolley Corriher
"Maggie's neighbor-women saw a young woman just like themselves, with children to feed, trying to build a life, and so they helped her, unquestioning in recognition that she would help them in return. This was so."

Not Forgotten
Winning Friends and Influencing Dead People
by JL Strickland
"Joe cackled fiendishly, addressing Vernon through the closed lid. 'Who's got the last laugh now, big boy?'"

Mason–Dixon Lines
Apple Slices
poetry by Todd Boss
". . . flavored of tin from
the lip of the cup
of a dented thermos
passed between us—"

Books
Elaine Neil Orr
A Different Sun: A Novel of Africa
reviewed by Fred Hobson

Jennifer Rae Greeson
Our South: Geographic Fantasy and the Rise of National Literature
reviewed by Michael McCollum

Angela C. Halfacre
A Delicate Balance: Constructing a Conservation Culture in the South Carolina Lowcountry
reviewed by Brian Grabbatin

About the Contributors

Harry L. Watson
Southern Cultures Volume 20: Number 1 – Summer 2014

Table of Contents

Front Porch
by Jocelyn R. Neal
"One of the challenges—and, simultaneously, deep pleasures—of studying the South is that the disciplinary walls of the academy neither contain nor constrain the work."

Rewriting Elizabeth
A Life Lost (and Found) in the Annals of Bryce Mental Hospital
by Lindsay Byron
"Her name was never to be spoken. Even upon the lips and within the hearts of her own children, remembrance was forbidden. Silence nearly erased her from history."

Ghosts, Wreckers, and Rotten Ties
The 1891 Train Wreck at Bostian's Bridge
by Scott Huffard
"When train number nine on the Western North Carolina Railroad tumbled off Bostian's Bridge in 1891, it ignited a media frenzy, as well as a firestorm of outrage, a detailed investigation, a compelling mystery, and a series of unanswered questions."

Photo Essay
Teenage Pastime
by Natalie Minik
"When the unlimited energy of adolescence comes to bear on the limited experience of childhood, the results often swing toward one of two poles—an enthusiastic confirmation of the culture a child grew into or a bold rejection of the culture they grew out of."

"The Best Notes Made the Most Votes"
W. C. Handy, E. H. Crump, and Black Music as Politics
by Mark A. Johnson
"'Feet commenced to pat. A moment later there was dancing on the sidewalks below. Hands went into the air, bodies swayed like the reeds on the banks of the Congo.'"

Taking Strong Drink
by Bill Koon
"Some devout Baptists complained that there was too much booze in a mini bottle for one drink; the rest of us complained that there wasn't enough."

South Polls
Partisan Change in Southern State Legislatures, 1953–2013
by Christopher A. Cooper and H. Gibbs Knotts
"At mid-century, the South had no Republican senators and only two Republicans in the 105-person southern House delegation. By 2000, [both] delegations were majority Republican."

Beyond Grits and Gravy
Maggie and Buck
Coal Camps, Cabbage Rolls, and Community in Appalachia
by Donna Tolley Corriher
"Maggie's neighbor-women saw a young woman just like themselves, with children to feed, trying to build a life, and so they helped her, unquestioning in recognition that she would help them in return. This was so."

Not Forgotten
Winning Friends and Influencing Dead People
by JL Strickland
"Joe cackled fiendishly, addressing Vernon through the closed lid. 'Who's got the last laugh now, big boy?'"

Mason–Dixon Lines
Apple Slices
poetry by Todd Boss
". . . flavored of tin from
the lip of the cup
of a dented thermos
passed between us—"

Books
Elaine Neil Orr
A Different Sun: A Novel of Africa
reviewed by Fred Hobson

Jennifer Rae Greeson
Our South: Geographic Fantasy and the Rise of National Literature
reviewed by Michael McCollum

Angela C. Halfacre
A Delicate Balance: Constructing a Conservation Culture in the South Carolina Lowcountry
reviewed by Brian Grabbatin

About the Contributors

James L. Peacock
Looking beyond broad theories of globalization, this volume examines the specific effects of globalizing forces on the southern United States. Eighteen essays approach globalization from a variety of perspectives, addressing such topics as relations between global and local communities; immigration, particularly of Latinos and Asians; local industry in a time of globalization; power and confrontation between rural and urban worlds; race, ethnicity, and organizing for social justice; and the assimilation of foreign-born professionals.

From portraits of the political and economic positions of Latinos in Miami and Houston to the effects of mountaintop removal on West Virginia communities, these snapshots of globalization across a broad southern ground help redirect the study of the South in response to how the South itself is being reshaped by globalization in the twenty-first century.

Contributors:
Catherine Brooks, Morristown, New Jersey
David H. Ciscel, University of Memphis
Thaddeus Countway Guldbrandsen, University of New Hampshire
Carla Jones, University of Colorado, Boulder
Sawa Kurotani, University of Redlands (Redlands, Cal.)
Paul A. Levengood, Virginia Historical Society
Carrie R. Matthews, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Bryan McNeil, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Marcela Mendoza, University of Memphis
Donald M. Nonini, University of Toronto
James L. Peacock, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Barbara Ellen Smith, University of Memphis
Jennie M. Smith, Berry College (Mount Berry, Ga.)
Sandy Smith-Nonini, University of Toronto
Ellen Griffith Spears, Emory University
Gregory Stephens, University of West Indies-Mona
Steve Striffler, University of Arkansas
Ajantha Subramanian, Harvard University
Meenu Tewari, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Lucila Vargas, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Harry L. Watson, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Rachel A. Willis, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

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