Southern Cultures: The Fifteenth Anniversary Reader

Univ of North Carolina Press
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What does "redneck" mean? What's going to happen to the southern accent? What makes black southerners laugh? What is "real" country music? These are the kinds of questions that pop up in this collection of notable essays from Southern Cultures, the journal of the Center for the Study of the American South at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Intentionally plural, Southern Cultures was founded in 1993 to present all sides of the American South, from sorority sisters to Pocahontas, from kudzu to the blues.

This volume collects 27 essays from the journal's first fifteen years, bringing together some of the most memorable and engaging essays as well as some of those most requested for use in courses. A stellar cast of contributors discusses themes of identity, pride, traditions, changes, conflicts, and stereotypes. Topics range from black migrants in Chicago to Mexican immigrants in North Carolina, from Tennessee wrestlers to Martin Luther King, from the Civil War to contemporary debates about the Confederate flag. Funny and serious, historical and contemporary, the collection offers something new for every South-watcher, with fresh perspectives on enduring debates about the people and cultures of America's most complex region.

Contributors:
Derek H. Alderman, East Carolina University
Donna G'Segner Alderman, Greenville, North Carolina
S. Jonathan Bass, Samford University
Dwight B. Billings, University of Kentucky
Catherine W. Bishir, Preservation North Carolina
Kathleen M. Blee, University of Pittsburgh
Elizabeth Boyd, Vanderbilt University
James C. Cobb, University of Georgia
Peter A. Coclanis, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Joseph Crespino, Emory University
Drew Gilpin Faust, Harvard University
franklin forts, University of Georgia
David Goldfield, University of North Carolina at Charlotte
Larry J. Griffin, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Adam Gussow, University of Mississippi
Trudier Harris, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Patrick Huber, University of Missouri-Rolla
Louis M. Kyriakoudes, University of Southern Mississippi
Melton McLaurin, University of North Carolina at Wilmington
Michael Montgomery, University of South Carolina
Steve Oney, Los Angeles, California
Theda Perdue, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Dan Pierce, University of North Carolina at Asheville
John Shelton Reed, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Mart Stewart, Western Washington University
Thomas A. Tweed, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Timothy B. Tyson, Duke University
Anthony Walton, Bowdoin College
Harry L. Watson, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Charles Reagan Wilson, University of Mississippi
C. Vann Woodward (1908-1999)



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About the author

Harry L. Watson is director of the Center for the Study of the American South and professor of history at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He is cofounder, with John Shelton Reed, of Southern Cultures.

Larry J. Griffin is John Shelton Reed Distinguished Professor of Sociology and professor of history at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Watson and Griffin are coeditors of Southern Cultures.

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Additional Information

Publisher
Univ of North Carolina Press
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Published on
Apr 28, 2008
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Pages
528
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ISBN
9780807886465
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Features
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Language
English
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Genres
History / United States / State & Local / South (AL, AR, FL, GA, KY, LA, MS, NC, SC, TN, VA, WV)
Social Science / Sociology / General
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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This Omnibus E-book brings together all four issues of Southern Cultures Volume 15, published in 2009.

Volume 15 of Southern Cultures explores Lee's Tomb, how Southern evangelicals kept sin from sacred spaces, the power of memorials, W.E.B. Du Bois's unusual connection to the United Daughters of the Confederacy, sundown towns, the African American architect who designed one of the South's elite institutions during Jim Crow, and both the Mississippi Delta and Core Sound Workboats in photographs.

It also includes two theme issues with multimedia content, "The Edible South" and "Music." "The Edible South," our first food issue, includes the favorite foods of our favorite writers, Drum Head Stew from the Eastern Shore of Virginia, girls' tomato clubs, Wormsloe plantation, select short films on food from our friends at the Southern Foodways Alliance on the bonus DVD, and more. Our Fall special issue is our third music issue includes a never-before-published interview with "Son" Thomas, a brief history of the boogie, Ella May Wiggins, Top Ten best of jazz, blues, country, and rock greats, Emmett Till in music and song, and more.

Enhanced with the 20 music tracks from the bonus CD, "Cool-Water Music," it brings together yet another eclectic mix of folk, blues, country, and alternative rock, from Pete Seeger to Whistlin' Britches to Charlie Louvin and George Jones to the Rosebuds. A feast!

Southern Cultures is published quarterly (spring, summer, fall, winter) by the University of North Carolina Press. The journal is sponsored by the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill's Center for the Study of the American South.

Shots rang out in Savannah's grandest mansion in the misty,early morning hours of May 2, 1981.  Was it murder or self-defense?  For nearly a decade, the shooting and its aftermath reverberated throughout this hauntingly beautiful city of moss-hung oaks and shaded squares.  John Berendt's sharply observed, suspenseful, and witty narrative reads like a thoroughly engrossing novel, and yet it is a work of nonfiction.  Berendt skillfully interweaves a hugely entertaining first-person account of life in this isolated remnant of the Old South with the unpredictable twists and turns of a landmark murder case.

It is a spellbinding story peopled by a gallery of remarkable characters: the well-bred society ladies of the Married Woman's Card Club; the turbulent young redneck gigolo; the hapless recluse who owns a bottle of poison so powerful it could kill every man, woman, and child in Savannah; the aging and profane Southern belle who is the "soul of pampered self-absorption"; the uproariously funny black drag queen; the acerbic and arrogant antiques dealer; the sweet-talking, piano-playing con artist; young blacks dancing the minuet at the black debutante ball; and Minerva, the voodoo priestess who works her magic in the graveyard at midnight.  These and other Savannahians act as a Greek chorus, with Berendt revealing the alliances, hostilities, and intrigues that thrive in a town where everyone knows everyone else.

Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil is a sublime and seductive reading experience.  Brilliantly conceived and masterfully written, this enormously engaging portrait of a most beguiling Southern city has become a modern classic.
Looking beyond broad theories of globalization, this volume examines the specific effects of globalizing forces on the southern United States. Eighteen essays approach globalization from a variety of perspectives, addressing such topics as relations between global and local communities; immigration, particularly of Latinos and Asians; local industry in a time of globalization; power and confrontation between rural and urban worlds; race, ethnicity, and organizing for social justice; and the assimilation of foreign-born professionals.

From portraits of the political and economic positions of Latinos in Miami and Houston to the effects of mountaintop removal on West Virginia communities, these snapshots of globalization across a broad southern ground help redirect the study of the South in response to how the South itself is being reshaped by globalization in the twenty-first century.

Contributors:
Catherine Brooks, Morristown, New Jersey
David H. Ciscel, University of Memphis
Thaddeus Countway Guldbrandsen, University of New Hampshire
Carla Jones, University of Colorado, Boulder
Sawa Kurotani, University of Redlands (Redlands, Cal.)
Paul A. Levengood, Virginia Historical Society
Carrie R. Matthews, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Bryan McNeil, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Marcela Mendoza, University of Memphis
Donald M. Nonini, University of Toronto
James L. Peacock, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Barbara Ellen Smith, University of Memphis
Jennie M. Smith, Berry College (Mount Berry, Ga.)
Sandy Smith-Nonini, University of Toronto
Ellen Griffith Spears, Emory University
Gregory Stephens, University of West Indies-Mona
Steve Striffler, University of Arkansas
Ajantha Subramanian, Harvard University
Meenu Tewari, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Lucila Vargas, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Harry L. Watson, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Rachel A. Willis, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

This Omnibus E-book brings together all four issues of Southern Cultures Volume 15, published in 2009.

Volume 15 of Southern Cultures explores Lee's Tomb, how Southern evangelicals kept sin from sacred spaces, the power of memorials, W.E.B. Du Bois's unusual connection to the United Daughters of the Confederacy, sundown towns, the African American architect who designed one of the South's elite institutions during Jim Crow, and both the Mississippi Delta and Core Sound Workboats in photographs.

It also includes two theme issues with multimedia content, "The Edible South" and "Music." "The Edible South," our first food issue, includes the favorite foods of our favorite writers, Drum Head Stew from the Eastern Shore of Virginia, girls' tomato clubs, Wormsloe plantation, select short films on food from our friends at the Southern Foodways Alliance on the bonus DVD, and more. Our Fall special issue is our third music issue includes a never-before-published interview with "Son" Thomas, a brief history of the boogie, Ella May Wiggins, Top Ten best of jazz, blues, country, and rock greats, Emmett Till in music and song, and more.

Enhanced with the 20 music tracks from the bonus CD, "Cool-Water Music," it brings together yet another eclectic mix of folk, blues, country, and alternative rock, from Pete Seeger to Whistlin' Britches to Charlie Louvin and George Jones to the Rosebuds. A feast!

Southern Cultures is published quarterly (spring, summer, fall, winter) by the University of North Carolina Press. The journal is sponsored by the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill's Center for the Study of the American South.

Our Fall 2013 special issue commemorates the Sesquicentennial of the Civil War. Featuring essays on the birth of photojournalism at the Battle of Antietam, the struggle over history and memory in the pages of Confederate Veteran Magazine, a historian's-eye-view of Charleston's Secession Ball, poetry from the Poet Laureate of the United States, Civil War remembrances from the Southern Oral History Program, and much more.

Contents

Front Porch
by Harry L. Watson
"The most powerful memories of the Civil War continue to be the personal stories, and while the transmission may be sputtering today, they remain the most evocative, both of the winners' frail victories and the losers' human pain."

Uncovering the Confederacy of the Mind
Or, How I Became a Belle of the Ball in Denmark Vesey's Church
by Blain Roberts
"We started to wonder: did twenty-first-century Charleston have separate—even segregated—tourism industries, one that focused on the city's white history and another that told of its black past?"

"The Great Weight of Responsibility"
The Struggle over History and Memory in Confederate Veteran Magazine
by Steven E. Sodergren
"'In the name of the future manhood of the South I protest. What are we to teach them? If we cannot teach them that their fathers were right, it follows that these Southern children must be taught that they were wrong.'"

The Revenant
photographs by Matthew P. Shelton
"I drilled until the book was lace."

Rebecca Harding Davis's Human Stories of the Civil War
by Mark Canada
"'The war is surging up close about us.—O . . . if I could put into your and every true woman's heart the inexpressible loathing I have for it! If you could only see the other side enough to see the wrong the tyranny on both!'"

Maffitt, May 1861–September 1862
An excerpt from Two Captains from Carolina: Moses Grandy, John Newland Maffitt, and the Coming of the Civil War
by Bland Simpson
"'No war? I have come to you directly from Washington City, where the caissons are rolling, where a great army has been gathering, where Lincoln is planning for war. Whether you are or not.'"

"Truthful as the Record of Heaven"
The Battle of Antietam and the Birth of Photojournalism
by John M. Harris
"'Let him who wishes to know what war is look at this series of illustrations. These wrecks of manhood thrown together in careless heaps or ranged in ghastly rows for burial were alive but yesterday.'"

"Mississippi's Greatest Hour"
The Mississippi Civil War Centennial and Southern Resistance
by Alyssa D. Warrick
"From the outset, Mississippi's commission had a clear goal, evinced by its name. The Mississippi Commission on the War Between the States was unapologetically pro-Confederate, though willing to acknowledge, however begrudgingly, the Union victory."

Voices from the Southern Oral History Program
"I Know It by Heart"
The Civil War in the Memories of John W. Snipes, Ralph W. Strickland, Edith
Mitchell Dabbs, and Reginald Hildebrand
interviewed by Brent Glass, Lu Ann Jones, Elizabeth Jacoway Burns, and Rob Stephens
compiled and introduced by Rachel F. Seidman
"'When my husband James was growing up, there was no race question. They assumed that was settled by the war. The Negroes were slaves and then they weren't. That settled it.'"

Mason-Dixon Lines
Elegy for the Native Guards
poetry by Natasha Trethewey
". . . 2nd Regiment, Union men, black phalanx.
What is monument to their legacy?"

About the Contributors


Southern Cultures is published quarterly (spring, summer, fall, winter) by the University of North Carolina Press. The journal is sponsored by the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill's Center for the Study of the American South.

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