Where the Buck Stops: The Personal and Private Writings of Harry S. Truman

New Word City
4
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Harry Truman was a man of common sense and uncommon insights. In this frank book, the thirty-third president of the United States speaks directly about the office of the presidency, about the best and worst presidents, and his own experience holding office.

Nearly every page contains a "Trumanism" - an unexpected insight, a little-known anecdote, or a pithy piece of wisdom. His topics range from "do-nothing presidents" to the way he felt military service undermined a leader's ability to command a country to his admiration for Abraham Lincoln. Truman writes about moments in presidential history with a warmth and sincerity that brings figures from George Washington to Franklin Roosevelt to life.

Willing to write frankly about his decision to drop the atomic bomb, but humble about his own impact on history, Truman offers a unique perspective on American history.
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About the author

Harry S. Truman was the thirty-third president of the United States. He is the author of 1945 - Year of Decision and 1946-1952 - Years of Trial and Hope.

Margaret Truman is the author of the New York Times bestseller Harry S. Truman and Bess Truman.

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Additional Information

Publisher
New Word City
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Published on
Feb 5, 2015
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Pages
766
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ISBN
9781612308395
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Language
English
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Genres
Biography & Autobiography / Historical
Biography & Autobiography / Presidents & Heads of State
History / Military / World War II
History / United States / 19th Century
History / United States / 20th Century
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Content Protection
This content is DRM free.
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Available on Android devices
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