Water, Civilisation and Power in Sudan: The Political Economy of Military-Islamist State Building

Cambridge University Press
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In 1989, a secretive movement of Islamists allied itself to a military cabal to violently take power in Africa's biggest country. Sudan's revolutionary regime was built on four pillars - a new politics, economic liberalisation, an Islamic revival, and a U-turn in foreign relations - and mixed militant conservatism with social engineering: a vision of authoritarian modernisation. Water and agricultural policy have been central to this state-building project. Going beyond the conventional lenses of famine, 'water wars' or the oil resource curse, Harry Verhoeven links environmental factors, development, and political power. Based on years of unique access to the Islamists, generals, and business elites at the core of the Al-Ingaz Revolution, Verhoeven tells the story of one of Africa's most ambitious state-building projects in the modern era - and how its gamble to instrumentalise water and agriculture to consolidate power is linked to twenty-first-century globalisation, Islamist ideology, and intensifying geopolitics of the Nile.
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About the author

Harry Verhoeven teaches African Politics at Oxford and is the founder and convenor of the Oxford University China-Africa Network, as well as the founder of the Oxford Central Africa Forum. He has collaborated with UNDP Sudan, Chatham House, Greenpeace India, and Small Arms Survey and has lectured at ministries of foreign affairs, defence academies, and leading universities around the world. He has published in Civil War; Conflict, Security and Development; Development and Change; Geopolitics; the Journal of Eastern African Studies; the Journal of Modern African Studies; Middle East Policy; Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society; the Review of African Political Economy; and The Washington Quarterly. He has recently been appointed to a professorship in Comparative Politics and International Relations at Georgetown University.

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Additional Information

Publisher
Cambridge University Press
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Published on
Mar 5, 2015
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Pages
337
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ISBN
9781316240403
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Language
English
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Genres
Business & Economics / Development / Sustainable Development
Nature / Ecology
Nature / Natural Resources
Political Science / American Government / General
Political Science / General
Political Science / International Relations / General
Political Science / Political Process / General
Political Science / Public Affairs & Administration
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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