Harvard Law Review: Volume 129, Number 5 - March 2016

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 The March 2016 issue, No. 5, features these contents: 

• Article, "Marriage Equality and the New Parenthood," by Douglas NeJaime 

• Essay, "Horizontal Shareholding," by Einer Elhauge 

• Book Review, "Keeping Track: Surveillance, Control, and the Expansion of the Carceral State," by Kathryne M. Young and Joan Petersilia   

• Note, "Constitutional Courts and International Law: Revisiting the Transatlantic Divide" 

• Note, "Defining the Press Exemption from Campaign Finance Restrictions" 

• Note, "Let the End Be Legitimate: Questioning the Value of Heightened Scrutiny's Compelling- and Important-Interest Inquiries" 

In addition, student commentary analyzes Recent Cases on state abortion laws and precedent; expectation of privacy in pocket dial; tax deductions for medical marijuana dispensary; appointments clause test for executive branch reassignments; takings by residential inclusionary zoning; and statutory interpretation using corpus linguistics. A commentary focuses on the Recent Court Filing by the DOJ arguing that a city ordinance prohibiting camping and sleeping outdoors violates the Eighth Amendment. Finally, the issue includes two brief comments on Recent Publications. 

The Harvard Law Review is offered in a quality digital edition, featuring active Contents, linked footnotes, active URLs, legible tables, and proper ebook and Bluebook formatting. The Review is a student-run organization whose primary purpose is to publish a journal of legal scholarship. It comes out monthly from November through June and has roughly 2500 pages per volume. Student editors make all editorial and organizational decisions. This is the fifth issue of academic year 2015-2016. 

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About the author

Principal articles and essays are written by recognized legal scholars, and student editors contribute substantial research in the form of Notes and commentaries on recent cases, court filings, and publications.

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Additional Information

Publisher
Quid Pro Books
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Published on
Mar 9, 2016
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Pages
305
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ISBN
9781610278171
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Features
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Language
English
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Genres
Law / Corporate
Law / Family Law / Marriage
Law / International
Law / Jurisprudence
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Available on Android devices
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Eligible for Family Library

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Contents of Harvard Law Review: Volume 130, Number 8 - June 2017 include:

* Article, "The Judicial Presumption of Police Expertise," by Anna Lvovsky  

* Essay, "The Debate That Never Was," by Nicos Stavropoulos  

* Essay, "Hart's Posthumous Reply," by Ronald Dworkin 

* Book Review, "Cooperative and Uncooperative Foreign Affairs Federalism," by Jean Galbraith  

* Note, "Rethinking Actual Causation in Tort Law"  

* Note, "The Justiciability of Servicemember Suits" 

* Note, "The Substantive Waiver Doctrine in Employment Arbitration Law" 

Furthermore, student commentary analyzes Recent Cases on: requiring proof of administrative feasibility to satisfy class action Rule 23; whether prison gerrymandering violates the Equal Protection Clause; justiciability of suit against the government for military sexual assaults; whether criminal procedure requires retroactive application of Hurst v. Florida to pre-Ring cases; whether statutory interpretation's rule of lenity requires fixing cocaine possession penalties by total drug weight; and, in international law, the UN's Security Council asserting Israel's settlement activities to be illegal. Finally, the issue includes several summaries of Recent Publications. 

The Harvard Law Review is offered in a quality digital edition, featuring active Contents, linked footnotes, active URLs, legible tables, and proper ebook and Bluebook formatting. The Review is a student-run organization whose primary purpose is to publish a journal of legal scholarship. It comes out monthly from November through June and has roughly 2300 pages per volume. Student editors make all editorial and organizational decisions. This is the final issue of academic year 2016-2017.

The contents of the May 2018 issue (Number 7) include: 
• Article, "Music as a Matter of Law," by Joseph P. Fishman  
• Article, "The Morality of Administrative Law," by Cass R. Sunstein & Adrian Vermeule  
• Book Review, "The Black Police: Policing Our Own," by Devon W. Carbado & L. Song Richardson 
• Note, "Section 230 as First Amendment Rule" 
In addition, the issue features extensive student commentary on Recent Cases, including such subjects as: a recent ruling that bystanders have a First Amendment right to record police but granting qualified immunity to police officers involved; whether a local (Massachusetts) drone ordinance is preempted by an FAA regulation; whether there is irreparable injury from a state's (Alabama's) lack of notice to people with felony convictions upon their re-enfranchisement; whether a state law (from South Dakota) is unconstitutional in requiring internet retailers without a physical presence in the state to remit sales tax (an issue currently before the U.S. Supreme Court); estate planning and digital inheritance, and whether personal representatives may provide lawful consent for the release of a decedent's emails; and finally whether a district court may use the policy of public understanding of the opioid epidemic to deny a plea bargain.  The Harvard Law Review is offered in a quality digital edition, featuring active Contents, linked footnotes, active URLs, legible tables, and proper eBook and Bluebook formatting. This current issue of the Review is May 2018, the 7th issue of academic year 2017-2018 (Volume 131). The Review is a student-run organization whose primary purpose is to publish a journal of legal scholarship. It comes out monthly from November through June and has roughly 2400 pages per volume. Student editors make all editorial and organizational decisions.
The Harvard Law Review, April 2015, is offered in a digital edition. Contents include the annual Developments in the Law survey of a particular area of legal concern; this year's topic is Policing. Other contents include: 

• Article, "Consent Procedures and American Federalism," by Bridget Fahey      

• Essay, "Anticipatory Remedies for Takings," by Thomas W. Merrill   

• Book Review, "How a 'Lawless' China Made Modern America: An Epic Told in Orientalism," by Carol G.S. Tan 

Specific subjects studied in Developments in the Law—Policing are: Policing and Profit, Policing Students, Policing Immigrant Communities, and Considering Police Body Cameras. 

In addition, the issue features student commentary on Recent Cases, including such subjects as: the business judgment rule and mergers; whistleblowing under Dodd-Frank and extraterritoriality; senate redistricting in New York; postmortem rights of publicity; standing and overlap of various tests used; informing one who pleads No Contest of collateral consequences; exceptions to New York marriage license requirement for out-of-state marriages; exclusionary rule for violations of Posse Comitatus restrictions; and extending federal forced labor statute to conduct criminalized under state law. Finally, the issue features several summaries of Recent Publications. 

The Harvard Law Review is a student-run organization whose primary purpose is to publish a journal of legal scholarship. The Review comes out monthly from November through June and has roughly 2500 pages per volume. The organization is formally independent of the Harvard Law School. Student editors make all editorial and organizational decisions. This issue of the Review is Apr. 2015, the 6th issue of academic year 2014-2015 (Volume 128). The digital edition features active Contents, linked notes, and proper ebook and Bluebook formatting. 

The contents of the May 2018 issue (Number 7) include: 
• Article, "Music as a Matter of Law," by Joseph P. Fishman  
• Article, "The Morality of Administrative Law," by Cass R. Sunstein & Adrian Vermeule  
• Book Review, "The Black Police: Policing Our Own," by Devon W. Carbado & L. Song Richardson 
• Note, "Section 230 as First Amendment Rule" 
In addition, the issue features extensive student commentary on Recent Cases, including such subjects as: a recent ruling that bystanders have a First Amendment right to record police but granting qualified immunity to police officers involved; whether a local (Massachusetts) drone ordinance is preempted by an FAA regulation; whether there is irreparable injury from a state's (Alabama's) lack of notice to people with felony convictions upon their re-enfranchisement; whether a state law (from South Dakota) is unconstitutional in requiring internet retailers without a physical presence in the state to remit sales tax (an issue currently before the U.S. Supreme Court); estate planning and digital inheritance, and whether personal representatives may provide lawful consent for the release of a decedent's emails; and finally whether a district court may use the policy of public understanding of the opioid epidemic to deny a plea bargain.  The Harvard Law Review is offered in a quality digital edition, featuring active Contents, linked footnotes, active URLs, legible tables, and proper eBook and Bluebook formatting. This current issue of the Review is May 2018, the 7th issue of academic year 2017-2018 (Volume 131). The Review is a student-run organization whose primary purpose is to publish a journal of legal scholarship. It comes out monthly from November through June and has roughly 2400 pages per volume. Student editors make all editorial and organizational decisions.
The Harvard Law Review is offered in a digital edition for ereaders, featuring active Contents, linked notes, and proper ebook formatting. The contents of Number 2 include:

• Article, “The (Non)Finality of  Supreme Court Opinions,” by Richard J. Lazarus 

• Book Review, “The Laws of Capitalism,” by David Singh Grewal 

• Note, “Citizens United at Work: How the Landmark Decision Legalized Political Coercion in the Workplace” 

• Note, “Data Mining, Dog Sniffs, and the Fourth Amendment” 

• Note, “Nonbinding Bondage”

The issue includes In Memoriam contributions about the life, scholarship, and teaching of John H. Mansfield. The contributors are Anthony D'Amato, Robert W. Gordon, Martha Minow, Frederick Schauer, and James A. Sonne. 

In addition, the issue features student commentary on Recent Cases and policy papers, including such subjects as internet law and privacy, Fourth Amendment right to deletion, state action and credit card fees, antitrust law and foreign trade, applicability of Seventh Amendment to states and commonwealths, free speech and tour guide licensing in D.C., labor law and sexual harassment claims, and gender crimes in international criminal law. Finally, the issue includes several summaries of Recent Publications. 

The Harvard Law Review is a student-run organization whose primary purpose is to publish a journal of legal scholarship. The Review comes out monthly from November through June. The organization is formally independent of the Harvard Law School. Student editors make all editorial and organizational decisions. This issue of the Review is December 2014, the second issue of academic year 2014-2015 (Volume 128).

The November issue is the special annual review of the U.S. Supreme Court's previous Term. Each year, the issue is introduced by noteworthy and extensive contributions from recognized scholars. In this issue, for the 2013 Term, articles include: • Foreword: "The Means of Constitutional Power," by John F. Manning • Comment: "Slipping the Bonds of Federalism," by Heather K. Gerken • Comment: "The Supreme Court as a Constitutional Court," by Jamal Greene • Comment: "The Hobby Lobby Moment," by Paul Horwitz 
In addition, the first issue of each new volume provides an extensive summary of the important cases of the previous Supreme Court docket, covering a wide range of legal, political and constitutional subjects. Student commentary on Leading Cases of the 2013 Term includes recent cases on: content neutrality under the First Amendment; compelled subsidized speech; free speech and contribution limits; legislative prayer and the establishment of religion; search and seizure law as to anonymous tips, cellphones, and cotenant consent; equal protection and political process; right to counsel; Eighth Amendment issues for intellectually impaired defendants; standing and jurisdiction; class actions; tribal immunity; the Clean Air Act; immigration of children; misrepresentation of buyer and gun control law; and copyright law's Transmit Clause. Complete statistical graphs and tables of the Court's actions and results during the Term are included. Finally, the issue features several summaries of Recent Publications. The issue also features essays on substantive and procedural law, and judicial method, honoring Justice Stephen G. Breyer and his notable contributions to law and the Supreme Court. The essays are written by scholars Martha Minow, Martha Field, Cass Sunstein, Richard Fallon, Michael Klarman, Todd Rakoff, Joseph Singer, John Manning, Laurence Tribe, I. Glenn Cohen, and Mark Tushnet.  The Harvard Law Review is offered in a quality digital edition, featuring active Contents, linked footnotes, active URLs, legible tables, and proper ebook and Bluebook formatting. This current issue of the Review is November 2014, the first issue of academic year 2014-2015 (Volume 128). 
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