Mountain Sisters: From Convent to Community in Appalachia

University Press of Kentucky
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Publisher
University Press of Kentucky
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Pages
332
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ISBN
9780813128115
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Language
English
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Genres
Religion / Institutions & Organizations
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This content is DRM free.
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John Howard Yoder
Tradition has painted a portrait of a Savior aloof from governmental concerns and whose teachings point to an apolitical life for his disciples. How, then, are we to respond today to a world so thoroughly entrenched in national and international affairs? But such a picture of Jesus is far from accurate, argues John Howard Yoder.

Using the texts of the New Testament, Yoder critically examines the traditional portrait of Jesus as an apolitical figure and attempts to clarify the true impact of Jesus' life, work, and teachings on his disciples' social behavior.

The book first surveys the multiple ways the image of an apolitical Jesus has been propagated, then canvasses the Gospel narrative to reveal how Jesus is rightly portrayed as a thinker and leader immediately concerned with the agenda of politics and the related issues of power, status, and right relations. Selected passages from the epistles corroborate a Savior deeply concerned with social, political, and moral issues.

In this thorough revision of his acclaimed 1972 text, Yoder provides updated interaction with publications touching on this subject. Following most of the chapters are new "epilogues" that summarize research conducted during the last two decades -- research that continues to support the insights set forth in Yoder's original work.

Currently a standard in many college and seminary ethics courses, The Politics of Jesus is also an excellent resource for the general reader desiring to understand Christ's response to the world of politics and his will for those who would follow him.
Gerhard Lohfink
Are not all religions equally close to and equally far from God? Why, then, the Church? Gerhard Lohfink poses these questions with scholarly reliability and on the basis of his own experience of community in Does God Need the Church? In 1982 Father Lohfink wrote Wie hat Jesus Gemeinde gewollt?(translated into English as Jesus and Community) to show, on the basis of the New Testament, that faith is founded in a community that distinguishes itself in clear contours from the rest of society. In that book he also described a sequence of events that moved directly from commonality to a community that was readily accessible to every group of people and was made legitimate by Jesus himself. Only later did Father Lohfink learn, within a new horizon of experience, that such a description is not the way to community. The story of the gathering of the people of God, from Abraham until today, never took place according to such a model. Today Father Lohfink states that he would not write Wie hat Jesus Gemeinde gewollt? the same way. The situation of belief and believers has undergone a shift: the question of the Church has become much more urgent. Church life is declining and the religions are returning, often in new guises. In light of these shifts and the change in his own view of community, Father Lohfink inquires in Does God Need the Church? of Israel?s theology, Jesus? praxis, the experiences of the early Christian communities, and of what is appearing in the Church today. These inquiries lead to an amazing history involving God and the world?a history that God presses forward with the aid of a single people and that always turns out differently from what they think and plan.?In our day, when confusion abounds concerning the identity and purpose of the Church, few books could be more timely. Indeed, this book is a virtual feast, and it should be considered essential fare for anyone who has ever struggled to articulate a theologically satisfying answer to the question in Lohfink?s title, anyone who cares deeply about the Church but who questions its relevancy in our place and time, or by anyone looking for help thinking through the no-less-vexing question of the Church?s relation to Israel.? Anglican Theological Review?... offers the reader a full-blown biblical and pastoral foundation for the life of the Church, emphasizing its roots in Judaism and the centrality of community. His informed portrayal of the early Church is not intended simply as a historical sketch but as a model for an invigorated Church today.? The Bible Today
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