Waymaking: An anthology of women’s adventure writing, poetry and art

Vertebrate Publishing
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Waymaking is an anthology of prose, poetry and artwork by women who are inspired by wild places, adventure and landscape.

Published in 1961, Gwen Moffat's Space Below My Feet tells the story of a woman who shirked the conventions of society and chose to live a life in the mountains. Some years later in 1977, Nan Shepherd published The Living Mountain, her prose bringing each contour of the Cairngorm mountains to life. These pioneering women set a precedent for a way of writing about wilderness that isn't about conquering landscapes, reaching higher, harder or faster, but instead about living and breathing alongside them, becoming part of a larger adventure.

The artists in this inspired collection continue Gwen and Nan's legacies, redressing the balance of gender in outdoor adventure literature. Their creativity urges us to stop and engage our senses: the smell of rain-soaked heather, wind resonating through a col, the touch of cool rock against skin, and most importantly a taste of restoring mind, body and spirit to a former equanimity.

With contributions from adventurers including Alpinist magazine editor Katie Ives, multi-award-winning author Bernadette McDonald, adventurers Sarah Outen and Anna McNuff, renowned filmmaker Jen Randall and many more, Waymaking is an inspiring and pivotal work published in an era when wilderness conservation and gender equality are at the fore.

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About the author

Helen Mort is a writer, trail runner and climber who lives in Sheffield. She teaches creative writing at Manchester Metropolitan University and has published two poetry collections with Chatto and Windus. Her latest, No Map Could Show Them, explores the history of women's mountaineering. She has been shortlisted for the Costa prize and the T.S. Eliot prize, and in 2014 won the Fenton Aldeburgh First Collection prize. Her first novel is forthcoming from Chatto in 2019. She is also the author of Lake District Trail Running and has written for Alpinist and Climb. In 2017, she was a judge for the Man Booker International Prize, and chair of judges for the Boardman Tasker Award for Mountain Literature.

Claire Carter is a writer, filmmaker and creative consultant, based between Sheffield and North Wales where she climbs, runs, and swims. She is the Artistic Director of Kendal Mountain Festival and the Engagement Officer for the Outdoor Industry Association. She has juried for Telluride Mountain Festival, Krakow Mountain Festival and SheExtreme Festival among others, and continues to work on the BMC's Women in Adventure competition. Her first film, Operation Moffat, codirected with Jen Randall, followed the life of the first female British mountain guide and won twenty-one international festival awards. Claire sits on the Nature Connection Index Academic Group, and is investigating how the arts can contribute to our connection to nature and allied empathy through her creative and corporate work.

Heather Dawe is a writer, painter, cyclist and runner and lives in Yorkshire with her partner and young family. A data scientist who has founded a leading healthcare analytics consultancy, her first book, Adventures in Mind, was published in 2013 and her second, A Bicycle Ride in Yorkshire, in 2014. Heather's paintings and prints have been exhibited publicly around the north of England. She finds inspiration in the time she spends running and cycling in the mountains and other wild places. As her daughters grow she increasingly shares adventures in the hills with them.

Camilla Barnard is an editor for Vertebrate Publishing and loves to climb, walk and generally be immersed in the outdoors. She is a keen dotwork illustrator and also enjoys practising yoga, reading and experimenting with various art mediums. She has worked on many of Vertebrate's most successful titles including There is No Map in Hell by Steve Birkinshaw and The Magician's Glass by Ed Douglas.

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Additional Information

Publisher
Vertebrate Publishing
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Published on
Oct 4, 2018
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Pages
296
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ISBN
9781910240762
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Language
English
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Genres
Art / Environmental & Land Art
Art / Individual Artists / Essays
Art / Subjects & Themes / Landscapes & Seascapes
Health & Fitness / Women's Health
Literary Collections / General
Nature / Essays
Poetry / Anthologies (multiple authors)
Sports & Recreation / Mountaineering
Sports & Recreation / Outdoor Skills
Travel / Special Interest / Adventure
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Available on Android devices
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Eligible for Family Library

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A New York Times Bestseller

A dramatic, inspiring memoir by legendary rock climber Tommy Caldwell, the first person to free climb the Dawn Wall of Yosemite’s El Capitan   

“The rarest of adventure reads:  it thrills with colorful details of courage and perseverance but it enriches readers with an absolutely captivating glimpse into how a simple yet unwavering resolve can turn adversity into reward.” —The Denver Post

A finalist for the Boardman Tasker Award for Mountain Literature

On January 14, 2015, Tommy Caldwell, along with his partner, Kevin Jorgeson, summited what is widely regarded as the hardest climb in history—Yosemite’s nearly vertical 3,000-foot Dawn Wall, after nineteen days on the route. Caldwell’s odds-defying feat—the subject of the documentary film The Dawn Wall to be released nationwide in September—was the culmination of an entire lifetime of pushing himself to his limits as an athlete.

This engrossing memoir chronicles the journey of a boy with a fanatical mountain-guide father who was determined to instill toughness in his son to a teen whose obsessive nature drove him to the top of the sport-climbing circuit. Caldwell’s affinity for adventure then led him to the vertigo-inducing and little understood world of big wall free climbing. But his evolution as a climber was not without challenges; in his early twenties, he was held hostage by militants in a harrowing ordeal in the mountains of Kyrgyzstan. Soon after, he lost his left index finger in an accident. Later his wife, and main climbing partner, left him. Caldwell emerged from these hardships with a renewed sense of purpose and determination. He set his sights on free climbing El Capitan’s biggest, steepest, blankest face—the Dawn Wall. This epic assault took more than seven years, during which time Caldwell redefined the sport, found love again, and became a father.

The Push is an arresting story of focus, drive, motivation, endurance, and transformation, a book that will appeal to anyone seeking to overcome fear and doubt, cultivate perseverance, turn failure into growth, and find connection with family and with the natural world.
The last descent and I can't let myself think it's in the bag. Anything could happen, take it easy, take no risks. Just get to the finish and win. 'The challenge and anticipation that pushes me to try harder. The obsessive urge to achieve. It's not all about winning. Why do I do it?' Growing up in Bristol, Heather Dawe was 17 when she started running. Having fallen in to the teenage trap of smoking and drinking she resolved to do something about it, not knowing then where it would take her. A climber since her youth, an obsession with wild places and the mountains was engrained in her DNA. Moving to Leeds to study, she began to compete in fell races and mountain marathons, joking in the pub one night that she could race at the highest level. Being hit by a car doing over 40mph while cycling would have ended many athletes' dreams, but Dawe's drive pushed her even harder. Hard enough to make her pub joke a reality, hard enough to win Elite Mountain Marathons, to win the Three Peaks Cyclo-cross race and to complete the Bob Graham Round. Pushing harder still, she entered the Tour Divide - racing the 2745-mile route of the Continental Divide in North America as she to sought to discover her physical - and emotional - limits. Dawe writes of what it takes to compete in adventure races; the training, the sacrifice, the mistakes that must be made in order to learn and develop. An intensely deep and personal book, Adventures in Mind explores what drives a woman - living with her partner and their child, working 9-5 - to push so hard and so far; into herself, and into the wild.
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