Historical Dictionary of the Catalans

Historical Dictionaries of Peoples and Cultures

Book 10
Scarecrow Press
1
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In this reference, Buffery and Marcer cover all of the areas historically inhabited by the Catalan people. These are, in order of size and population: Catalonia, which accounts for over half of the population of the Catalan-speaking areas; Valencia, with over a third; the Balearic Islands with just under 8 percent; and the Catalunya Nord, the Principality of Andorra, and the Catalan-speaking areas within Aragon, Murcia, and Alghero.

The Historical Dictionary of the Catalans deals not only with the people who live in Catalonia, but with the language and culture of the Catalan countries as well. This is done through a chronology, an introductory essay, a bibliography, and over 600 cross-referenced dictionary entries on significant persons, places, events, institutions, and aspects of culture, society, economy, and politics.
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About the author

Helena Buffery is senior lecturer in Hispanic Studies at the University of Birmingham. She was Honorary Secretary of the Anglo-Catalan Society from 1998 to 2009 and lectures on Catalan history and culture.

Elisenda Marcer is lecturer at the University of Birmingham, where she teaches courses on Catalan language, society, and culture.
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Additional Information

Publisher
Scarecrow Press
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Published on
Dec 18, 2010
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Pages
454
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ISBN
9780810875142
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Language
English
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Genres
History / Europe / Spain & Portugal
History / Reference
Reference / Dictionaries
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Eligible for Family Library

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