A Doll's House

Faber & Faber
2
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The Vaughans are all set to enjoy Christmas. Thomas has been promoted and Nora is delighted. Everything at last seems to be going right, until a visitor arrives uninvited and causes them to question just how perfect their marriage is.

Henrik Ibsen's A Doll's House caused outrage both in its style and subject matter when first staged in 1879. Zinnie Harris's retelling is played against the backdrop of British politics at the turn of the last century - to revel a world where duty, power and hypocrisy rule.

Zinnie Harris's version of A Doll's House premiered at the Donmar Warehouse, London, in May 2009.

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About the author

Zinnie Harris's plays include the multi-award-winning Further than the Furthest Thing (National Theatre/Tron
Theatre; winner of the 1999 Peggy Ramsay Award, 2001 John Whiting Award, Edinburgh Fringe First Award),
How to Hold Your Breath (Royal Court Theatre; joint winner of the Berwin Lee Award), The Wheel (National
Theatre of Scotland; joint winner of the 2011 Amnesty International Freedom of Expression Award), Nightingale
and Chase (Royal Court Theatre), Midwinter, Solstice (both RSC), Fall (Traverse Theatre/RSC), By Many
Wounds (Hampstead Theatre) and This Restless House (National Theatre of Scotland/Citizens Theatre; Best New
Play, Critics' Award for Theatre in Scotland, 2016). Her adaptations include Ibsen's A Doll's House for the
Donmar Warehouse and Strindberg's Miss Julie for the National Theatre of Scotland. Zinnie received an Arts
Foundation Fellowship for playwriting, and was Writer in Residence at the RSC, 2000-2001. She is Professor of
Playwriting and Screenwriting at St Andrews University, and an Associate Director at the Traverse Theatre.

Henrik Ibsen (1828-1906), Norwegian poet and playwright, was one of the shapers of modern theatre, who tempered naturalism with an understanding of social responsibility and individual psychology. His earliest major plays, Brand (1866) and Peer Gynt (1867), were large-scale verse dramas, but with Pillars of the Community (1877) he began to explore contemporary issues. There followed A Doll's House (1879), Ghosts (1881) and An Enemy of the People (1882). A richer understanding of the complexity of human impulses marks such later works as The Wild Duck (1885), Rosmersholm (1886), Hedda Gabler (1890) and The Master Builder (1892), while the imminence of mortality overshadows his last great plays, John Gabriel Borkman (1896) and When We Dead Awaken (1899).

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Additional Information

Publisher
Faber & Faber
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Published on
Jun 19, 2014
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Pages
128
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ISBN
9780571307692
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Language
English
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Genres
Drama / General
Performing Arts / Theater / General
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Available on Android devices
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Eligible for Family Library

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