Step Up: Lead in Six Moments that Matter

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No matter what your title or place on the organization chart,you have the potential to be a leader—or more precisely, thepotential to exercise leadership in the moments that matter most.Leadership is not a job title or position, but rather an action. Incertain moments and situations, anyone can rise to the occasion toact as a leader—gaining respect, confidence, and ultimatelygreater success in the organization. But how can you recognizethese moments where leadership is required, and then know what todo?

Step Up explains six critical "leadershipmoments"—everyday instances when you have a choice to shineor let opportunity pass you by. Based on their own research andextensive client work, Evans and Foster identify six regularlyoccurring moments and help you understand how to act wisely anddecisively when those moments arise, showing how to:

  • Get Angry, Not Stupid
  • Avoid Terminal Politeness
  • Decide Already
  • Act When You are the Problem
  • Leverage Pessimism
  • Reverse Momentum

Anyone can take advantage of opportunities to act as a leaderwhen the time is right—and reap the rewards. Step Upis a guide to exercising leadership when it matters most, boostingyour personal impact and effectiveness, and making a realdifference.

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About the author

HENRY EVANS is founder and managing partner for DynamicResults, LLC, specializing in strategy execution, executivedevelopment, and emotionally intelligent leadership. His firstbook, Winning with Accountability, was published in 2008. Helives in San Francisco, California.

COLM FOSTER specializes in working with executives andtheir teams to improve individual and team effectiveness. He is anadjunct faculty member of University College Dublin and holds a PhDand MBA. Colm lives in Dublin, Ireland, with his family.

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Additional Information

Publisher
John Wiley & Sons
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Published on
Mar 26, 2014
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Pages
224
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ISBN
9781118891735
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Language
English
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Genres
Business & Economics / Leadership
Business & Economics / Management
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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"Is there anyone on earth who is so narrow-minded or uninquisitive that he could fail to want to know how and thanks to what kind of political system almost the entire known world was conquered and brought under a single empire in less than fifty-three years?" --Polybius, Histories The 53-year period Polybius had in mind stretched from the start of the Second Punic War in 219 BCE until 167, when Rome overthrew the Macedonian monarchy and divided the country into four independent republics. This was the crucial half-century of Rome's spectacular rise to imperial status, but Roman interest in its eastern neighbors began a little earlier, with the First Illyrian War of 229, and climaxed later with the infamous destruction of Corinth in 146. Taken at the Flood chronicles this momentous move by Rome into the Greek east. Until now, this period of history has been overshadowed by the threat of Carthage in the west, but events in the east were no less important in themselves, and Robin Waterfield's account reveals the peculiar nature of Rome's eastern policy. For over seventy years, the Romans avoided annexation so that they could commit their military and financial resources to the fight against Carthage and elsewhere. Though ultimately a failure, this policy of indirect rule, punctuated by periodic brutal military interventions and intense diplomacy, worked well for several decades, until the Senate finally settled on more direct forms of control. Waterfield's fast-paced narrative focuses mainly on military and diplomatic maneuvers, but throughout he interweaves other topics and themes, such as the influence of Greek culture on Rome, the Roman aristocratic ethos, and the clash between the two best fighting machines the ancient world ever produced: the Macedonian phalanx and Roman legion. The result is an absorbing account of a critical chapter in Rome's mastery of the Mediterranean.
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