Belka, Why Don't You Bark?

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Belka, Why Don’t You Bark? begins in 1943, when Japanese troops retreat from the Aleutian island of Kiska, leaving four military dogs behind. One of them dies in isolation, and the others are taken under the protection of U.S. troops. Meanwhile, in the USSR, a KGB military dog handler kidnaps the daughter of a Japanese yakuza. Named after the Russian astronaut dog Strelka, the girl develops a psychic connection with canines. A multi-generational epic as seen through the eyes of man’s best friend, the dogs who are used as mere tools for the benefit of humankind gradually discover their true selves, and learn something about us. -- VIZ Media
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About the author

Hideo Furukawa was born in Fukushima in 1966. He dropped out of Waseda University’s literature program. He was nominated for the Naoki Prize with Belka, Why Don’t You Bark? in 2005 and won the Mishima Yukio Prize with Love in 2006. Furukawa has been active in giving readings as an expression of literature and has collaborated beyond the genre of fiction in fields including music, art, and dance.

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Additional Information

Publisher
VIZ Media LLC
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Published on
Oct 16, 2012
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Pages
320
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ISBN
9781421550893
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Language
English
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Genres
Fiction / Fantasy / Contemporary
Fiction / Literary
Fiction / Thrillers / General
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Read Aloud
Available on Android devices
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Eligible for Family Library

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