The Iliad; Ed: With Apparatus Criticus, Prolegomena, Notes, and Appendices, Volume 2

Macmillan and Company, limited

Reviews

Loading...

Additional Information

Publisher
Macmillan and Company, limited
Read more
Published on
Dec 31, 1888
Read more
Pages
532
Read more
Read more
Best For
Read more
Language
English
Read more
Content Protection
This content is DRM free.
Read more

Reading information

Smartphones and Tablets

Install the Google Play Books app for Android and iPad/iPhone. It syncs automatically with your account and allows you to read online or offline wherever you are.

Laptops and Computers

You can read books purchased on Google Play using your computer's web browser.

eReaders and other devices

To read on e-ink devices like the Sony eReader or Barnes & Noble Nook, you'll need to download a file and transfer it to your device. Please follow the detailed Help center instructions to transfer the files to supported eReaders.
Homer
A lean, fleet-footed translation that recaptures Homer’s “nimble gallop” and brings an ancient epic to new life.

The first great adventure story in the Western canon, The Odyssey is a poem about violence and the aftermath of war; about wealth, poverty, and power; about marriage and family; about travelers, hospitality, and the yearning for home.

In this fresh, authoritative version—the first English translation of The Odyssey by a woman—this stirring tale of shipwrecks, monsters, and magic comes alive in an entirely new way. Written in iambic pentameter verse and a vivid, contemporary idiom, this engrossing translation matches the number of lines in the Greek original, thus striding at Homer’s sprightly pace and singing with a voice that echoes Homer’s music.

Wilson’s Odyssey captures the beauty and enchantment of this ancient poem as well as the suspense and drama of its narrative. Its characters are unforgettable, from the cunning goddess Athena, whose interventions guide and protect the hero, to the awkward teenage son, Telemachus, who struggles to achieve adulthood and find his father; from the cautious, clever, and miserable Penelope, who somehow keeps clamoring suitors at bay during her husband’s long absence, to the “complicated” hero himself, a man of many disguises, many tricks, and many moods, who emerges in this translation as a more fully rounded human being than ever before.

A fascinating introduction provides an informative overview of the Bronze Age milieu that produced the epic, the major themes of the poem, the controversies about its origins, and the unparalleled scope of its impact and influence. Maps drawn especially for this volume, a pronunciation glossary, and extensive notes and summaries of each book make this an Odyssey that will be treasured by a new generation of scholars, students, and general readers alike.

Book 7
Homer, the legendary author of ‘The Iliad’ and ‘The Odyssey’, was regarded by the ancient Greeks to be the first and greatest of the epic poets. His works have shaped the course of Western literature, influencing countless writers of the two millennia since they were first composed. Delphi’s Ancient Classics series provides eReaders with the treasures of the Classical world, with both English translations and the original Greek texts.  This comprehensive eBook presents Homer’s complete extant works, with beautiful illustrations, informative introductions, a special dual Greek and English section and the usual Delphi bonus material. (Version 3)

* Beautifully illustrated with images relating to Homer's life and works
* Features the complete extant works of Homer, in both English translation and the original Greek
* Concise introductions to the epic poems and other works
* Provides both verse and prose translations of ‘The Iliad’ and ‘The Odyssey’
* Multiple translations of the epic poems: 8 translations of ‘The Iliad’ and 6 translations of ‘The Odyssey’
* Includes Augustus Taber Murray’s translations of both epics, which previously appeared in Loeb Classical Library editions of Homer’s works
* Character notes on major figures of the Trojan Epic Cycle
* Images of famous paintings inspired by Homer’s works
* Excellent formatting of the texts
* Easily locate the poems or sections you want to read with individual contents tables
* Includes Homer's rare spurious works and fragments, first time in digital print
* Provides a special dual English and Greek text of ‘The Iliad’ and ‘The Odyssey’, allowing readers to compare the sections paragraph by paragraph – ideal for students
* Features 6 bonus biographies and critical works – immerse yourself in Homer's ancient world
* Scholarly ordering of texts into chronological order and literary genres
* UPDATED with Murray’s translations of ‘The Iliad’ and ‘The Odyssey’
* UPDATED with Dual Greek and English section
* UPDATED with 6 biographical and critical works

Please visit www.delphiclassics.com to browse through our range of exciting titles

CONTENTS:

The Translations

THE ILIAD
CAST OF CHARACTERS
THE ILIAD – Chapman’s Translation
THE ILIAD – Pope’s Translation
THE ILIAD – Cowper’s Translation
THE ILIAD – Butler’s Translation
THE ILIAD – Lang’s Translation
THE ILIAD – Buckley’s Translation
THE ILIAD – Derby’s Translation
THE ILIAD – Murray’s Translation

THE ODYSSEY
CAST OF CHARACTERS
THE ODYSSEY – Pope’s Translation
THE ODYSSEY – Cowper’s Translation
THE ODYSSEY – Lang’s Translation
THE ODYSSEY – Butler’s Translation
THE ODYSSEY – Murray’s Translation
THE ADVENTURES OF ULYSSES – Charles Lamb

THE HOMERIC HYMNS

FRAGMENTS AND SPURIOUS WORKS
HOMER’S EPIGRAMS
FRAGMENTS OF LOST EPIC POEMS
THE WAR OF THE TITANS
THE STORY OF OEDIPUS
THE THEBAID
THE EPIGONI
THE CYPRIA
THE AETHIOPIS
THE LITTLE ILIAD
THE SACK OF ILIUM
THE RETURNS
THE TELEGONY
NON-EPIC POEMS ATTRIBUTED TO HOMER
THE EXPEDITION OF AMPHIARAUS
THE TAKING OF OECHALIA
THE PHOCAIS
THE MARGITES
THE CERCOPES
THE BATTLE OF FROGS AND MICE
THE CONTEST OF HOMER AND HESIOD

The Greek Texts
PRONOUNCING ANCIENT GREEK
LIST OF GREEK TEXTS

The Dual Texts
DUAL GREEK AND ENGLISH TEXTS

The Biographies and Criticism
THE WORLD OF HOMER by Andrew Lang
HOMER AND HIS AGE by Andrew Lang
HOMER AND THE EPIC by Charles Burton Gulick
HOMER AND CLASSICAL PHILOLOGY by Friedrich Nietzsche
HOMER by T. W. Lumb
HOMER AND THEOCRITUS by William Ernest Henley

Please visit www.delphiclassics.com to browse through our range of exciting titles

Homer


THE ILIAD

by Homer

translated by Samuel Butler

BOOK I

Sing, O goddess, the anger of Achilles son of Peleus, that brought

countless ills upon the Achaeans. Many a brave soul did it send

hurrying down to Hades, and many a hero did it yield a prey to dogs

and vultures, for so were the counsels of Jove fulfilled from the

day on which the son of Atreus, king of men, and great Achilles, first

fell out with one another.

And which of the gods was it that set them on to quarrel? It was the

son of Jove and Leto; for he was angry with the king and sent a

pestilence upon the host to plague the people, because the son of

Atreus had dishonoured Chryses his priest. Now Chryses had come to the

ships of the Achaeans to free his daughter, and had brought with him a

great ransom: moreover he bore in his hand the sceptre of Apollo

wreathed with a suppliant's wreath and he besought the Achaeans, but

most of all the two sons of Atreus, who were their chiefs.

"Sons of Atreus," he cried, "and all other Achaeans, may the gods

who dwell in Olympus grant you to sack the city of Priam, and to reach

your homes in safety; but free my daughter, and accept a ransom for

her, in reverence to Apollo, son of Jove."

On this the rest of the Achaeans with one voice were for

respecting the priest and taking the ransom that he offered; but not

so Agamemnon, who spoke fiercely to him and sent him roughly away.

"Old man," said he, "let me not find you tarrying about our ships, nor

yet coming hereafter. Your sceptre of the god and your wreath shall

profit you nothing. I will not free her. She shall grow old in my

house at Argos far from her own home, busying herself with her loom

and visiting my couch; so go, and do not provoke me or it shall be the

worse for you."

The old man feared him and obeyed. Not a word he spoke, but went

by the shore of the sounding sea and prayed apart to King Apollo

whom lovely Leto had borne. "Hear me," he cried, "O god of the

silver bow, that protectest Chryse and holy Cilla and rulest Tenedos

with thy might, hear me oh thou of Sminthe. If I have ever decked your

temple with garlands, or burned your thigh-bones in fat of bulls or

goats, grant my prayer, and let your arrows avenge these my tears upon

the Danaans."

Thus did he pray, and Apollo heard his prayer. He came down

furious from the summits of Olympus, with his bow and his quiver

upon his shoulder, and the arrows rattled on his back with the rage

that trembled within him. He sat himself down away from the ships with

a face as dark as night, and his silver bow rang death as he shot

his arrow in the midst of them. First he smote their mules and their

hounds, but presently he aimed his shafts at the people themselves,

and all day long the pyres of the dead were burning.

For nine whole days he shot his arrows among the people, but upon

the tenth day Achilles called them in assembly- moved thereto by Juno,

who saw the Achaeans in their death-throes and had compassion upon

them. Then, when they were got together, he rose and spoke among them.

"Son of Atreus," said he, "I deem that we should now turn roving

home if we would escape destruction, for we are being cut down by

war and pestilence at once. Let us ask some priest or prophet, or some

reader of dreams (for dreams, too, are of Jove) who can tell us why

Phoebus Apollo is so angry, and say whether it is for some vow that we

have broken, or hecatomb that we have not offered, and whether he will

accept the savour of lambs and goats without blemish, so as to take

away the plague from us."
©2017 GoogleSite Terms of ServicePrivacyDevelopersArtistsAbout Google
By purchasing this item, you are transacting with Google Payments and agreeing to the Google Payments Terms of Service and Privacy Notice.