Revolutionary Suicide: (Penguin Classics Deluxe Edition)

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The searing, visionary memoir of founding Black Panther Huey P. Newton, in a dazzling graphic package

Eloquently tracing the birth of a revolutionary, Huey P. Newton's famous and oft-quoted autobiography is as much a manifesto as a portrait of the inner circle of America's Black Panther Party, which is recognizing its 50th anniversary in October 2016. From Newton's impoverished childhood on the streets of Oakland to his adolescence and struggles with the system, from his role in the Black Panthers to his solitary confinement in the Alameda County Jail, Revolutionary Suicide is smart, unrepentant, and thought-provoking in its portrayal of inspired radicalism.


For more than seventy years, Penguin has been the leading publisher of classic literature in the English-speaking world. With more than 1,700 titles, Penguin Classics represents a global bookshelf of the best works throughout history and across genres and disciplines. Readers trust the series to provide authoritative texts enhanced by introductions and notes by distinguished scholars and contemporary authors, as well as up-to-date translations by award-winning translators.


From the Trade Paperback edition.
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About the author

Born the son of a Baptist minister in 1942 in Monroe, Louisiana, Huey P. Newton moved to Oakland, California, with his family at the age of three. Although functionally illiterate upon graduating from high school, he taught himself to read by studying Plato’s Republic. Newton enrolled at Oakland City College, where he campaigned successfully to have black history included in the curriculum. While at the college, he became familiar with the writings of Marx, Lenin, Frantz Fanon, and Chairman Mao. In 1966, with Bobby Seale, Newton co-founded the Black Panther Party for Self-Defense, an organization in which Newton served as minister of defense. Though perhaps best known for their community street patrols, which openly displayed loaded firearms, the Black Panthers also sponsored breakfast programs for poor children and provided shoes and health care for the needy in the black community. Convicted in 1968 of manslaughter in the shooting death of Oakland police officer John Frey in 1968, Newton spent more than a year and a half in prison before his conviction was reversed. After a series of mistrials, the case against Newton was voluntarily dismissed. After reaching its high-water mark in 1970, when it claimed several thousand members, the Black Panther Party steadily declined, undermined in part by the efforts of the FBI. Accused of another murder in 1974, Newton jumped bail and spent the next three years in Cuba, after which he returned to the United States to stand trial and was acquitted of the charge. Newton earned a doctorate from the University of California, Santa Cruz, in 1980. He was shot to death by a gang member in 1989.


From the Trade Paperback edition.
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Additional Information

Publisher
Penguin
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Published on
Sep 29, 2009
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Pages
384
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ISBN
9781101140475
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Features
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Language
English
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Genres
Biography & Autobiography / Cultural Heritage
Biography & Autobiography / Political
History / United States / 20th Century
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Eligible for Family Library

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Adisa Franklin
The Liberation to the African Mind: The Key to Black Salvation is a strong book written to the millions of African Americans who have had their history distorted by the Church and public schools. Because of these distortions Black people are estranged and alienated from their culture and the wisdom of their ancestors. The book challenges African Americans to begin to think for themselves especially in the realm of religion.

 

It is a prophetic book with a revolutionary perspective. It is prophetic in that it points to the direction the Black Church must take to effectively address the spiritual needs of the Black community. It is revolutionary because it challenges the Church and believers to establish a new paradigm, an African Spiritual frame of reference. The Black Church must transform itself and take on a new view of the scriptures, doctrines and dogmas of Christendom.

 

This book documents the fact that what Blacks have been given as Christianity is in reality stolen African mythology, cosmology and history that has been corrupted by Roman and Greek priest, philosophers and emperors. It is one of the most powerful challenges to Orthodox Christianity to date. The Truth will liberate you from their strong delusions.

 

While there is indeed some positive and beneficial aspects to Church membership it is time for the Black Church to make its exodus from the Western religious way of faith in God to the African spiritual way of knowledge of God.

 

Black Pastors and religious leaders must begin to teach that which will bring about the manifestation of the fullness of Christ. This is the charge given to all church leadership by the Bible they teach from. “And He Himself gave some to be apostles, some prophets, some evangelist, some pastors and teachers, for the equipping of the saints for the work of the ministry, for the edifying of the body of Christ, till we all come to the unity of the faith and the knowledge of the Son of God, to be a perfect man, to the measure of the stature of the fullness of Christ.” Ephesians 4:11-13. There are far too many Babes in Christ in the Church. It is not the fault of the believers but a reflection of corrupted doctrines and false dogmas. In addition the unity of the Black Church must become a priority. Not one church or believer can say they have no need of the rest of the Body of Christ in good conscience. Yet unity in the Black Church is more a rhetorical than an actual reality. Imagine what could be done if the wealth of the Church was combined to establish a super fund. Unity must be at the top of the agenda for the Black Church and for the Black community.

 

Lastly, though we have the proverbial church on every corner there is an undeniable spiritual crisis in the Black community. The Liberation of the African Mind: The Key to Black Salvation makes the Spiritual Resurrection of the Black man a valid goal and priority. It will challenge many long held beliefs and dogmas, however Christendom must be examined and that which is not of God must be abandoned. Not since Marcus Garvey, Fredrick Douglas and the Honorable Elijah Muhammad have Blacks questioned the validity or efficacy of Christianity. Mr. Muhammad made an attempt to make Blacks aware that Christianity was the religion of the people who had enslaved them. Every race worships God in a way that is peculiar to their culture. Since the days of captivity Blacks have worshiped the god of their conquerors and oppressors. Worshipping a White man as God is not only a form of idolatry but extremely detrimental to the Black Psyche. 

 

Stanley Tookie Williams
A gripping tale of personal revolution by a man who went from Crips co-founder to Nobel Peace Prize nominee, author, and antigang activist

When his L.A. neighborhood was threatened by gangbangers, Stanley Tookie Williams and a friend formed the Crips, but what began as protection became worse than the original gangs. From deadly street fights with their rivals to drive-by shootings and stealing cars, the Crips' influence -- and Tookie's reputation -- began to spread across L.A. Soon he was regularly under police surveillance, and, as a result, was arrested often, though always released because the charges did not stick. But in 1981, Tookie was convicted of murdering four people and was sent to death row at San Quentin in Marin County, California.

Tookie maintained his innocence and began to work in earnest to prevent others from following his path. Whether he was creating nationwide peace protocols, discouraging adolescents from joining gangs, or writing books, Tookie worked tirelessly for the rest of his life to end gang violence. Even after his death, his legacy continues, supported by such individuals as Archbishop Desmond Tutu, Snoop Dogg, Jesse Jackson, and many more.

This posthumous edition of Blue Rage, Black Redemption features a foreword by Tavis Smiley and an epilogue by Barbara Becnel, which details not only the influence of Tookie's activism but also her eyewitness account of his December 2005 execution, and the inquest that followed.

By turns frightening and enlightening, Blue Rage, Black Redemption is a testament to the strength of the human spirit and an invaluable lesson in how rage can be turned into redemption.
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