The Book of Thunks

Crown House Publishing
Free sample

A Thunk is a beguiling question about everyday things that stops you in your tracks and helps you start to look at the world in a whole new light. A thunk will shake up your templates, rattle your thought routines, and make you think about things differently! The ideal gift for possibly the most impossible person to buy for!
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About the author

One of the UK's leading educational innovators, trainers and speakers, combining work with young people and educationalists around the world with writing and TV appearances. He is the author of numerous books including The Little Book of Thunks which won the Author's Licensing and Collecting Society Award for Educational Writing by the Society of Authors.

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Additional Information

Publisher
Crown House Publishing
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Published on
Oct 29, 2008
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Pages
330
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ISBN
9781845903138
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Language
English
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Genres
Philosophy / General
Philosophy / Language
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Read Aloud
Available on Android devices
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Eligible for Family Library

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Why do I need a teacher when I’ve got Google? is just one of the challenging, controversial and thought-provoking questions Ian Gilbert poses in this urgent and invigorating book.

Questioning the unquestionable, this fully updated new edition will make you re-consider everything you thought you knew about teaching and learning, such as:


• Are you simply preparing the next generation of unemployed accountants?
• What do you do for the ‘sweetcorn kids’ who come out of the education system in pretty much the same state as when they went in?
• What’s the real point of school?
• Exams – So whose bright idea was that?
• Why ‘EQ’ is fast becoming the new ‘IQ’.
• What will your school policy be on brain-enhancing technologies?
• Which is the odd one out between a hamster and a caravan?


With his customary combination of hard-hitting truths, practical classroom ideas and irreverent sense of humour, Ian Gilbert takes the reader on a breathless rollercoaster ride through burning issues of the twenty-first century, considering everything from the threats facing the world and the challenge of the BRIC economies to the link between eugenics and the 11+.


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