Community Disability Services: An Evidence-based Approach to Practice

Purdue University Press
5
Free sample

This book provides an integration of the principles, policy and practice of disability service provision in the twenty-first century. It demonstrates links between theory and practice, with an emphasis on evidence-based practice, and is drawn from international research. Ultimately, this book will enhance critical analysis and reflection, enabling students and service providers to better choose between approaches, and implement strategies that best facilitate positive outcomes for people with disabilities. Available in the United States and Canada only.
Read more
Collapse

About the author

Dr. Ian Dempsey is senior lecturer and disability studies program coordinator, faculty of education and arts at the University of Newcastle, Australia. Published in many international, refereed professional journals, Dempsey's research interests cover legislation and policy for people with a disability, family empowerment, and staff training and development in disability services. Dr. Karen Nankervis is Program Leader in Disability Studies at RMIT University, Melbourne. She has been extensively involved in the local, national and international disability sector. Her research interests include service and program planning, case management, staff training, service provision to people with a dual diagnosis, working with offenders with a disability, and skill development for people with an intellectual disability.
Read more
Collapse
4.8
5 total
Loading...

Additional Information

Publisher
Purdue University Press
Read more
Collapse
Published on
Dec 31, 2006
Read more
Collapse
Pages
398
Read more
Collapse
ISBN
9781557534149
Read more
Collapse
Read more
Collapse
Read more
Collapse
Language
English
Read more
Collapse
Genres
Political Science / Public Policy / General
Political Science / Public Policy / Social Services & Welfare
Psychology / General
Social Science / People with Disabilities
Read more
Collapse
Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
Read more
Collapse
Read Aloud
Available on Android devices
Read more
Collapse

Reading information

Smartphones and Tablets

Install the Google Play Books app for Android and iPad/iPhone. It syncs automatically with your account and allows you to read online or offline wherever you are.

Laptops and Computers

You can read books purchased on Google Play using your computer's web browser.

eReaders and other devices

To read on e-ink devices like the Sony eReader or Barnes & Noble Nook, you'll need to download a file and transfer it to your device. Please follow the detailed Help center instructions to transfer the files to supported eReaders.
A crucial contemporary dynamic around children and young people in the Global North is the multiple ways that have emerged to monitor their development, behaviour and character. In particular disabled children or children with unusual developmental patterns can find themselves surrounded by multiple practices through which they are examined.

This rich book draws on a wide range of qualitative research to look at how disabled children have been cared for, treated and categorised. Narrative and longitudinal interviews with children and their families, along with stories and images they have produced and notes from observations of different spaces in their lives – medical consultation rooms, cafes and leisure centres, homes, classrooms and playgrounds amongst others – all make a contribution.

Bringing this wealth of empirical data together with conceptual ideas from disability studies, sociology of the body, childhood studies, symbolic interactionism and feminist critical theory, the authors explore the multiple ways in which monitoring occurs within childhood disability and its social effects. Their discussion includes examining the dynamics of differentiation via medicine, social interaction, and embodiment and the multiple actors – including children and young people themselves – involved. The book also investigates the practices that differentiate children into different categories and what this means for notions of normality, integration, belonging and citizenship.

Scrutinising the multiple forms of monitoring around disabled children and the consequences they generate for how we think about childhood and what is ‘normal’, this volume sits at the intersection of disability studies and childhood studies.

"

This is the only text to provide comprehensive coverage of human growth and development, a requirement mandated by the Council of Rehabilitation Education (CORE) for a master's degree in rehabilitation counseling and for Licensed Professional Counselor certification. Written by an eminent leader in the field of disability studies, this volume reflects a significant change in perceptions of individuals with disabilities from being defined foremost by their disability to being viewed as normal individuals with a disability. It provides an understanding of traditional human growth and development that will enhance the practice of disability counseling by enabling an understanding of a client's childhood and prior life experiences.

The book begins with a focus on developmental theories and tasks, followed by a discussion of cultural and ethical considerations in human development. It considers the major theories of human development as they relate to people with and without disabilities, and career theories with a focus on the concept of choice. The book addresses specific developmental stages including a description of developmental tasks, risks, disability applications, specific disabilities common to a particular stage, and cultural and ethical issues, all supported by case examples.

Key Features:

Fulfills the required CORE mandated course on human growth and development and the disability experience Addresses disability across the lifespan in relation to developmental stages Authored by highly respected expert in disability studies "
From the National Book Award–winning author of The Noonday Demon: An Atlas of Depression comes a monumental new work, a decade in the writing, about family. In Far from the Tree, Andrew Solomon tells the stories of parents who not only learn to deal with their exceptional children but also find profound meaning in doing so.

Solomon’s startling proposition is that diversity is what unites us all. He writes about families coping with deafness, dwarfism, Down syndrome, autism, schizophrenia, multiple severe disabilities, with children who are prodigies, who are conceived in rape, who become criminals, who are transgender. While each of these characteristics is potentially isolating, the experience of difference within families is universal, as are the triumphs of love Solomon documents in every chapter.

All parenting turns on a crucial question: to what extent parents should accept their children for who they are, and to what extent they should help them become their best selves. Drawing on forty thousand pages of interview transcripts with more than three hundred families, Solomon mines the eloquence of ordinary people facing extreme challenges. Whether considering prenatal screening for genetic disorders, cochlear implants for the deaf, or gender reassignment surgery for transgender people, Solomon narrates a universal struggle toward compassion. Many families grow closer through caring for a challenging child; most discover supportive communities of others similarly affected; some are inspired to become advocates and activists, celebrating the very conditions they once feared. Woven into their courageous and affirming stories is Solomon’s journey to accepting his own identity, which culminated in his midlife decision, influenced by this research, to become a parent.

Elegantly reported by a spectacularly original thinker, Far from the Tree explores themes of generosity, acceptance, and tolerance—all rooted in the insight that love can transcend every prejudice. This crucial and revelatory book expands our definition of what it is to be human.
Finalist for the 2017 Pulitzer Prize in General Nonfiction

An extraordinary narrative history of autism: the riveting story of parents fighting for their children ’s civil rights; of doctors struggling to define autism; of ingenuity, self-advocacy, and profound social change.

Nearly seventy-five years ago, Donald Triplett of Forest, Mississippi, became the first child diagnosed with autism. Beginning with his family’s odyssey, In a Different Key tells the extraordinary story of this often misunderstood condition, and of the civil rights battles waged by the families of those who have it. Unfolding over decades, it is a beautifully rendered history of ordinary people determined to secure a place in the world for those with autism—by liberating children from dank institutions, campaigning for their right to go to school, challenging expert opinion on what it means to have autism, and persuading society to accept those who are different. 

It is the story of women like Ruth Sullivan, who rebelled against a medical establishment that blamed cold and rejecting “refrigerator mothers” for causing autism; and of fathers who pushed scientists to dig harder for treatments. Many others played starring roles too: doctors like Leo Kanner, who pioneered our understanding of autism; lawyers like Tom Gilhool, who took the families’ battle for education to the courtroom; scientists who sparred over how to treat autism; and those with autism, like Temple Grandin, Alex Plank, and Ari Ne’eman, who explained their inner worlds and championed the philosophy of neurodiversity.

This is also a story of fierce controversies—from the question of whether there is truly an autism “epidemic,” and whether vaccines played a part in it; to scandals involving “facilitated communication,” one of many treatments that have proved to be blind alleys; to stark disagreements about whether scientists should pursue a cure for autism. There are dark turns too: we learn about experimenters feeding LSD to children with autism, or shocking them with electricity to change their behavior; and the authors reveal compelling evidence that Hans Asperger, discoverer of the syndrome named after him, participated in the Nazi program that consigned disabled children to death.

By turns intimate and panoramic, In a Different Key takes us on a journey from an era when families were shamed and children were condemned to institutions to one in which a cadre of people with autism push not simply for inclusion, but for a new understanding of autism: as difference rather than disability.
©2019 GoogleSite Terms of ServicePrivacyDevelopersArtistsAbout Google|Location: United StatesLanguage: English (United States)
By purchasing this item, you are transacting with Google Payments and agreeing to the Google Payments Terms of Service and Privacy Notice.