Late Classical Pottery from Ancient Corinth: Drain 1971-1 in the Forum Southwest

American School of Classical Studies at Athens
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In 1971, in the southwestern area of the Roman Forum of Corinth, a round-bottomed drainage channel was discovered filled with the largest deposit of pottery of the 4th century ever found in the city, as well as some coins, terracotta figurines, and metal and stone objects. This volume publishes the pottery and metal and stone objects, and includes a re-examination of the coins by Orestes Zervos. Some of the cooking ware has been subjected to neutron activation analysis, and a statistical analysis of all recovered pottery has been completed. The contents of Drain 1971-1 are important for the function of the Classical buildings in this part of Corinth, especially Buildings I and II, and for the chronology of the renovation program that included the construction of the South Stoa, which was probably not built before the last decade of the 4th century.
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About the author

Ian D. McPhee directs the A. D. Trendall Research Centre for Ancient Mediterranean Studies at La Trobe University. Elizabeth G. Pemberton is Reader in Classics at the University of Melbourne.

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Additional Information

Publisher
American School of Classical Studies at Athens
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Published on
Oct 24, 2012
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Pages
318
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ISBN
9781621390114
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Best For
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Language
English
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Genres
Art / History / Ancient & Classical
History / Ancient / Greece
Social Science / Archaeology
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Eligible for Family Library

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