The Emperor's New Drugs: Exploding the Antidepressant Myth

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Do antidepressants work? Of course—everyone knows it. Like his colleagues, Irving Kirsch, a researcher and clinical psychologist, for years referred patients to psychiatrists to have their depression treated with drugs before deciding to investigate for himself just how effective the drugs actually were. Over the course of the past fifteen years, however, Kirsch's research—a thorough analysis of decades of Food and Drug Administration data—has demonstrated that what everyone knew about antidepressants was wrong. Instead of treating depression with drugs, we've been treating it with suggestion.

The Emperor's New Drugs makes an overwhelming case that what had seemed a cornerstone of psychiatric treatment is little more than a faulty consensus. But Kirsch does more than just criticize: he offers a path society can follow so that we stop popping pills and start proper treatment for depression.

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About the author

Irving Kirsch, a native of New York City, is a professor of psychology at the University of Hull, United Kingdom, and professor emeritus at the University of Connecticut. His research has been published in the British Medical Journal and covered in USA Today, New Scientist, the New York Times, Newsweek, and more. He currently lives in Hull, United Kingdom.
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Additional Information

Publisher
Basic Books
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Published on
Jan 26, 2010
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Pages
240
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ISBN
9780465021048
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Language
English
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Genres
Psychology / Neuropsychology
Science / Life Sciences / Human Anatomy & Physiology
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Available on Android devices
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Eligible for Family Library

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