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 The Digital Puritan is a quarterly digest of carefully selected Puritan works which provides a steady diet of sound Puritan teaching. The language has been gently modernised to render it more readable, while still retaining much of the flavour and character of the original text. Hundreds of helpful notes and Scripture references (in the English Standard Version®) are included as end-notes; no internet connection is needed.

The following articles appear in this summer 2014 edition:

1. Self-Denial – in which Isaac Ambrose expounds Mark 8:34, showing that self-denial must be a cardinal feature of Christ’s true disciples.

2. The Almost Christian – George Whitefield shows from Acts 26:28 that having the trappings of religion is not the same thing as having true saving faith.

3. God’s Regard for His Own Glory, Seen in the Saving of Sinners – in which Stephen Charnock illustrates the rich glory of God as can only be seen in his redemption of sinful men.

4. Charity, in Respect of Other Men’s Sins – John Howe teaches from 1 Corinthians 13:6 that believers should never rejoice over the failings or misfortunes of others, and should be predisposed to grant them the benefit of the doubt.

5. A Word to the Aged – comforting and insightful teaching from William Bridge for those who have nearly run their course.

The Puritans in Verse: A Psalm of Praise – Richard Baxter.

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Publisher
Digital Puritan Press
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Pages
170
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ISBN
9781312385986
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Language
English
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Genres
Religion / Christian Church / History
Religion / Christian Life / Devotional
Religion / Christian Life / Spiritual Growth
Religion / Christian Theology / History
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Content Protection
This content is DRM free.
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Available on Android devices
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Eligible for Family Library

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Historians typically single out the hundred-year period from about 1050 to 1150 as the pivotal moment in the history of the Latin Church, for it was then that the Gregorian Reform movement established the ecclesiastical structure that would ensure Rome’s dominance throughout the Middle Ages and beyond. In Before the Gregorian Reform John Howe challenges this familiar narrative by examining earlier, "pre-Gregorian" reform efforts within the Church. He finds that they were more extensive and widespread than previously thought and that they actually established a foundation for the subsequent Gregorian Reform movement.

The low point in the history of Christendom came in the late ninth and early tenth centuries—a period when much of Europe was overwhelmed by barbarian raids and widespread civil disorder, which left the Church in a state of disarray. As Howe shows, however, the destruction gave rise to creativity. Aristocrats and churchmen rebuilt churches and constructed new ones, competing against each other so that church building, like castle building, acquired its own momentum. Patrons strove to improve ecclesiastical furnishings, liturgy, and spirituality. Schools were constructed to staff the new churches. Moreover, Howe shows that these reform efforts paralleled broader economic, social, and cultural trends in Western Europe including the revival of long-distance trade, the rise of technology, and the emergence of feudal lordship. The result was that by the mid-eleventh century a wealthy, unified, better-organized, better-educated, more spiritually sensitive Latin Church was assuming a leading place in the broader Christian world.

Before the Gregorian Reform challenges us to rethink the history of the Church and its place in the broader narrative of European history. Compellingly written and generously illustrated, it is a book for all medievalists as well as general readers interested in the Middle Ages and Church history.

#1 NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER • “A lucid, intelligent page-turner” (Los Angeles Times) that challenges long-held assumptions about Jesus, from the host of Believer
 
Two thousand years ago, an itinerant Jewish preacher walked across the Galilee, gathering followers to establish what he called the “Kingdom of God.” The revolutionary movement he launched was so threatening to the established order that he was executed as a state criminal. Within decades after his death, his followers would call him God.
 
Sifting through centuries of mythmaking, Reza Aslan sheds new light on one of history’s most enigmatic figures by examining Jesus through the lens of the tumultuous era in which he lived. Balancing the Jesus of the Gospels against the historical sources, Aslan describes a man full of conviction and passion, yet rife with contradiction. He explores the reasons the early Christian church preferred to promulgate an image of Jesus as a peaceful spiritual teacher rather than a politically conscious revolutionary. And he grapples with the riddle of how Jesus understood himself, the mystery that is at the heart of all subsequent claims about his divinity.
 
Zealot yields a fresh perspective on one of the greatest stories ever told even as it affirms the radical and transformative nature of Jesus’ life and mission.
 
Praise for Zealot
 
“Riveting . . . Aslan synthesizes Scripture and scholarship to create an original account.”—The New Yorker
 
“Fascinatingly and convincingly drawn . . . Aslan may come as close as one can to respecting those who revere Jesus as the peace-loving, turn-the-other-cheek, true son of God depicted in modern Christianity, even as he knocks down that image.”—The Seattle Times
 
“[Aslan’s] literary talent is as essential to the effect of Zealot as are his scholarly and journalistic chops. . . . A vivid, persuasive portrait.”—Salon
 
“This tough-minded, deeply political book does full justice to the real Jesus, and honors him in the process.”—San Francisco Chronicle
 
“A special and revealing work, one that believer and skeptic alike will find surprising, engaging, and original.”—Jon Meacham, Pulitzer Prize–winning author of Thomas Jefferson: The Art of Power
 
“Compulsively readable . . . This superb work is highly recommended.”—Publishers Weekly (starred review)
The Existence and Attributes of God comprises the first two volumes of the works of Stephen Charnock (1628-1680), an English puritan divine who was highly skilled in philosophy, patristics, Reformed theology, and Biblical languages. These volumes are his abiding monument. They are worthy of being compared with the finest in theology. "When the existence and attributes of God are called into question, to whom else can we better go than to Stephen Charnock'' . . . ''those [things revealed belong to us and to our children forever]. The material that Charnock discusses is firmly founded in the Word of God'' . . . ''Both the Old Testament and the New emphasize these two things: First, we should study the whole revelation, not just some easy or favorite parts of it; secondly, the study of God's attributes is not dry as dust theology, but is practical; that is, it leads to righteousness" (Dr. Gordon H. Clark, from a preface to this great work in a Sovereign Grace edition, 1958). One of the greatest tragedies in these spiritually starved times is the sad fact that most Christians know so very little about their God. It is often said that this is simply because these volumes are exhaustive on the subject. Yet it is clearly filled with sublime expositions of the truth regarding God's existence and attributes. "Charnock displays God's attributes not as impersonal abstractions for the mind to juggle with, but as qualities observable in the concrete actions of the living God of which the Bible speaks. The technical terms and sometimes, arguments of scholastic theology are employed, but always with a Biblical orientation. Charnock has no desire to speculate, but only to declare the works and ways, the nature and character, of the God of the Bible. The substance of his doctrine is characteristically Puritan and representatively Reformed." (Dr. James I. Packer, in The Encyclopedia of Christianity, Volume II, p. 410) The possessor of these rare volumes will be blessed by getting acquainted with the incomparable God, and thereby will reach a higher plane of spiritual enjoyment never attained before. To know Him better is to love Him more.
 In The Christian Warrior, Isaac Ambrose (1604–1664) provides armament and strategy to fight our tireless adversary, the devil. He begins by showing, from Ephesians 6:12, how all God's people are warriors engaged in a battle, that our enemy is both powerful and malicious, and that we must wrestle and strive hard against him. He then gives specific examples of how Satan attacks us at different stages of life: in childhood, at our first conversion, during the prime of life, and at the time of death. Ambrose gives practical, point-by-point advice throughout the book on how to cope with these attacks. He illustrates how Satan attempts to foil the believer coming to Christ at each stage of his conversion. He then shows how Satan tries to convince the doubting believer that his conversion is not genuine, and how to answer those arguments. He continues by showing how to endure persecution, how to resist temptations of the flesh (lust, pride, anger, condemning others, dishonest gain), and how Satan attempts to exploit the special vulnerabilities of both weak and strong Christians. He concludes by preparing the believer for "the final battle" in the hour of his death (which is often his most intense time of attack), by illustrating how to avoid the extremes of presumption and despair.

Even readers not accustomed to Puritan works will find Ambrose's warm and engaging style both eminently useful and Christ-exalting. Much more than a copy-paste-publish e-book, this Digital Puritan Press reprint has been carefully edited from the original scans. The more difficult language has been smoothed out to make it more accessible to the modern reader. Every Scripture reference is also hyperlinked as an endnote in the ESV version (no internet connection is needed). Includes a helpful biographical preface to the life and times of the author.

The book reveals that Whitefield was both a great man of prayer, and a voracious reader. For instance, he acknowledges Matthew Henry's Commentary, Alleine's Alarm, A Call to the Unconverted, A Serious Call to a Devout and Holy Life, among the many classics that he fed upon and found both soul-stirring and soul-satisfying. In his personal life, he very much reminds one of Jonathan Edwards, being so dedicated in all his activities. In fact, all his hours were assigned in this way: ''I . . . generally divided the day into three parts - eight hours for study and retirement, eight hours for sleep and meals, and eight hours for reading prayers, catechizing and visiting the parish.'' (p. 41). The Second Journal covered May 1738 to November 1738. This is the first journal that he consented to be printed. He arrived in Georgia on May 17, 1738 He then gives various experiences, sometimes day by day, sometimes a week or more between. The Third Journal covers December, 1738 through June, 1739, when he returned to London. He spoke to huge crowds. He preached almost constantly, and often from morning to midnight he was either preaching or witnessing personally. People almost hung on the rafters to hear him. Throughout this book you will see demonstrated the Scriptures in action. He breathed spirituality in his every appearance, private or public. At this time he was yet but 24 years of age. Such a life, some may say, is not for them. So prone are we to think that some of our hours and thoughts are our own. Whatever one's progress in holiness may be, the reader of these journals may be sure that much of Whitefield's spirit will greatly profit his or her soul. After all, how many opportunities does one have to look into the heart and soul of such a committed servant of God. Get it. It may be but a personal account, but it is sure to be of great value to any Christian. Whitefield (1714-1770) is the justly famous evangelist of the eighteenth century. He wrote his first rather full autobiographical account while on board ship in 1736. The balance of the book chronicles his travels as an evangelist through 1756.Despite the well-known differences in doctrine between Whitefield and John Wesley (which resulted at last in his famous letter to that one), he counted both John and Charles Wesley as dear friends. 332 pages, hard cover
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