Fragments of Isabella: A Memoir of Auschwitz

Open Road Media
12
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The deeply moving true account of a young Jewish woman’s imprisonment by the Nazis at the Auschwitz death camp.
 
In 1944, on the morning of Isabella’s birthday, she and her family were deported to Auschwitz, the Nazi extermination camp. There, Isabella and her siblings relied on one another’s love and support to remain hopeful in the midst of the great evil surrounding them. With the voice of a poet, she reveals a humanity in a world of darkness.
 
Thirty years after she escaped from the Nazis, Isabella wrote this powerful and luminous Pulitzer Prize–nominated memoir. Hailed by Publishers Weekly as “a celebration of the strength of the human spirit as it passes through fire,” Fragments of Isabella has become a classic of holocaust literature and human survival.
 
This ebook features rare images from the author’s estate.
 
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About the author

Isabella Leitner (1921–2009) was born and raised in Hungary. On her twenty-third birthday, she was deported to Auschwitz along with her mother, four sisters, and brother, an experience she wrote about in her acclaimed memoir Fragments of Isabella, which was published in 1978 and named an American Library Association Best Book for Young Adults. A motion picture based on the book was produced by the Abbey Theater in Ireland. In 1945, the author immigrated to the United States and married Irving A. Leitner, who served in a US Air Force bomber squadron during World War II. The mother of two sons, Peter and Richard, whom she considered “her greatest victory over Hitler,” Leitner also wrote Saving the Fragments: From Auschwitz to New York and The Big Lie: A True Story.
 
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Reviews

4.8
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Additional Information

Publisher
Open Road Media
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Published on
Jun 14, 2016
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Pages
121
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ISBN
9781504036665
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Language
English
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Genres
Biography & Autobiography / Personal Memoirs
History / Holocaust
History / Jewish
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Available on Android devices
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Eligible for Family Library

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