Detective in the White City: The Real Story of Frank Geyer

RW Publishing House
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"Compelling read...history at its best!" "A 19th Century Gem" History of a famous detective who outsmarted killer H. H. Holmes and others like him. The remarkable story of the uncompromising and relentless detective who investigated one of America's first serial killers, the man known as the 'Devil in the White City,' H. H. Holmes. This extraordinary historical biography features 120 year old murder cases that made national headlines and the history of one of America's largest police departments.


What if scholars said your family died in a fire...but it never happened? Detective in the White City reveals the hideous and hurtful lie scholars told about Geyer's family. 


Features:

-Geyer's incredible investigation of H. H. Holmes, Benjamin Pitezel, the discovery of the missing Pitezel children, Holmes' trial, and the 'the Devil in Him'

-Mary Hannah Tabbs and George Wilson torso murder

-Sarah Jane Whiteling, the first woman to be hung in Philadelphia

-White Chapel Row

-Mrs. Annie Gaskin murderous cat

-Top secret search in Rio de Janeiro

-Fake highwaymen murder for insurance, and plot to kill Detective Geyer

-Law enforcement and Philadelphia history

-Reuben Geyer in the Civil War, President Franklin Pierce, and Franks' hometown

-Truth about Geyer's wife and daughter

-with Sources, List of Illustrations and Credits, Bibliography, Notes, and Index

-BONUS: 95 rare historical photos and illustrations, restored

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About the author

JD is the author of Detective in the White City: The Real Story of Frank Geyer and Holmes' Own Story: Confessed 27 Murders, Lied The Died. A retired Emergency Management professional, JD writes in the biography, history, true crime, and thriller genres and is a member of Biographers International Organization, Nonfiction Authors Association, and International Thriller Writers.

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Additional Information

Publisher
RW Publishing House
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Published on
Dec 5, 2017
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Pages
428
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ISBN
9781946100030
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Language
English
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Genres
Biography & Autobiography / Law Enforcement
History / United States / State & Local / Middle Atlantic (DC, DE, MD, NJ, NY, PA)
History / United States / State & Local / Midwest (IA, IL, IN, KS, MI, MN, MO, ND, NE, OH, SD, WI)
Social Science / Sociology / Urban
True Crime / Murder / Serial Killers
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Content Protection
This content is DRM free.
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Read Aloud
Available on Android devices
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A fascinating look into the mind of one of America's first serial killers! 
Featuring the confessions, death, and unusual concrete burial of H. H. Holmes. BONUS: Eighty-seven rare historical illustrations with sources! 

H. H. Holmes was a diabolical killer made famous in the popular Erik Larson book, The Devil in the White City. He built a three story Murder Castle in Chicago in the 19th century with death on his mind and lured unsuspecting victims into secret rooms, vaults and gas chambers and made use of a dissection table in his basement. Holmes preyed on travelers that came to the Chicago World's Fair (World's Columbian Exposition) in 1893. He advertised rooms for rent and offered employment opportunities in his Murder Castle, often called Holmes Castle and World's Fair Hotel. 

A doctor by trade, Holmes lured unsuspecting victims into secret rooms, vaults and gas chambers and made use of a dissection table in his basement. He preyed on travelers that came to Chicago for the World Columbian Exposition in 1893 by advertising rooms for rent and offering employment opportunities. No doubt about it, Holmes earned despicable nicknames such as Arch Fiend, Butcher, Modern Bluebeard, Swindler, and Moral Degenerate. Holmes was a monster in disguise as a doctor, a perfect ruse to lure his victims. After all, who would not trust a doctor? 

Learn about Holmes personality and what his thought process was like, straight from the mind of a killer. This three-part book includes Holmes' memoir and his confession of twenty-seven murders. It also has details about his death, unusual burial, and an odd story Holmes told about his reincarnation. Notes, illustration credits, bibliography, and index are included.

Introduction by Gillian Flynn
Afterword by Patton Oswalt

“I’ll Be Gone in the Dark will undoubtedly be stocked in the True Crime section, which is fine, but in so many ways it’s a brilliant genre-buster. It’s propulsive, can’t-stop-now reading, which makes it all too easy to ignore the clean and focused writing.

What readers need to know—what makes this book so special—is that it deals with two obsessions, one light and one dark. The Golden State Killer is the dark half; Michelle McNamara’s is the light half. It’s a journey into two minds, one sick and disordered, the other intelligent and determined. I loved this book.”   —Stephen King

A masterful true crime account of the Golden State Killer—the elusive serial rapist turned murderer who terrorized California for over a decade—from Michelle McNamara, the gifted journalist who died tragically while investigating the case.

"You’ll be silent forever, and I’ll be gone in the dark."

For more than ten years, a mysterious and violent predator committed fifty sexual assaults in Northern California before moving south, where he perpetrated ten sadistic murders. Then he disappeared, eluding capture by multiple police forces and some of the best detectives in the area.

Three decades later, Michelle McNamara, a true crime journalist who created the popular website TrueCrimeDiary.com, was determined to find the violent psychopath she called "the Golden State Killer." Michelle pored over police reports, interviewed victims, and embedded herself in the online communities that were as obsessed with the case as she was.

At the time of the crimes, the Golden State Killer was between the ages of eighteen and thirty, Caucasian, and athletic—capable of vaulting tall fences. He always wore a mask. After choosing a victim—he favored suburban couples—he often entered their home when no one was there, studying family pictures, mastering the layout. He attacked while they slept, using a flashlight to awaken and blind them. Though they could not recognize him, his victims recalled his voice: a guttural whisper through clenched teeth, abrupt and threatening.

I’ll Be Gone in the Dark—the masterpiece McNamara was writing at the time of her sudden death—offers an atmospheric snapshot of a moment in American history and a chilling account of a criminal mastermind and the wreckage he left behind. It is also a portrait of a woman’s obsession and her unflagging pursuit of the truth. Framed by an introduction by Gillian Flynn and an afterword by her husband, Patton Oswalt, the book was completed by Michelle’s lead researcher and a close colleague. Utterly original and compelling, it is destined to become a true crime classic—and may at last unmask the Golden State Killer.

In The Devil in the White City, the smoke, romance, and mystery of the Gilded Age come alive as never before.

Two men, each handsome and unusually adept at his chosen work, embodied an element of the great dynamic that characterized America’s rush toward the twentieth century. The architect was Daniel Hudson Burnham, the fair’s brilliant director of works and the builder of many of the country’s most important structures, including the Flatiron Building in New York and Union Station in Washington, D.C. The murderer was Henry H. Holmes, a young doctor who, in a malign parody of the White City, built his “World’s Fair Hotel” just west of the fairgrounds—a torture palace complete with dissection table, gas chamber, and 3,000-degree crematorium.

Burnham overcame tremendous obstacles and tragedies as he organized the talents of Frederick Law Olmsted, Charles McKim, Louis Sullivan, and others to transform swampy Jackson Park into the White City, while Holmes used the attraction of the great fair and his own satanic charms to lure scores of young women to their deaths. What makes the story all the more chilling is that Holmes really lived, walking the grounds of that dream city by the lake.

The Devil in the White City draws the reader into a time of magic and majesty, made all the more appealing by a supporting cast of real-life characters, including Buffalo Bill, Theodore Dreiser, Susan B. Anthony, Thomas Edison, Archduke Francis Ferdinand, and others. Erik Larson’s gifts as a storyteller are magnificently displayed in this rich narrative of the master builder, the killer, and the great fair that obsessed them both.

To find out more about this book, go to http://www.DevilInTheWhiteCity.com.
A fascinating look into the mind of one of America's first serial killers! 
Featuring the confessions, death, and unusual concrete burial of H. H. Holmes. BONUS: Eighty-seven rare historical illustrations with sources! 

H. H. Holmes was a diabolical killer made famous in the popular Erik Larson book, The Devil in the White City. He built a three story Murder Castle in Chicago in the 19th century with death on his mind and lured unsuspecting victims into secret rooms, vaults and gas chambers and made use of a dissection table in his basement. Holmes preyed on travelers that came to the Chicago World's Fair (World's Columbian Exposition) in 1893. He advertised rooms for rent and offered employment opportunities in his Murder Castle, often called Holmes Castle and World's Fair Hotel. 

A doctor by trade, Holmes lured unsuspecting victims into secret rooms, vaults and gas chambers and made use of a dissection table in his basement. He preyed on travelers that came to Chicago for the World Columbian Exposition in 1893 by advertising rooms for rent and offering employment opportunities. No doubt about it, Holmes earned despicable nicknames such as Arch Fiend, Butcher, Modern Bluebeard, Swindler, and Moral Degenerate. Holmes was a monster in disguise as a doctor, a perfect ruse to lure his victims. After all, who would not trust a doctor? 

Learn about Holmes personality and what his thought process was like, straight from the mind of a killer. This three-part book includes Holmes' memoir and his confession of twenty-seven murders. It also has details about his death, unusual burial, and an odd story Holmes told about his reincarnation. Notes, illustration credits, bibliography, and index are included.

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