Foundations of Quantum Physics I (1926 - 1932)

Niels Bohr - Collected Works

Book 6
Elsevier
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Foundations of Quantum Physics I (1926 - 1932)
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Publisher
Elsevier
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Published on
Oct 22, 2013
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Pages
492
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ISBN
9780080871042
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Language
English
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Science / Physics / General
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Volume 7 is a direct continuation of Volume 6, which documented the birth of the complementarity argument and its earliest elaborations. It covers the extension and refinement of the complementarity argument from 1933 until Bohrs' death in 1962. All Bohr's publications on the subject, together with selected manuscripts and extracts of his correspondence with friends and fellow pioneers such as Werner Heisenberg and Wolfgang Pauli, are included.

Divided into two, largely independent parts, the volume begins with Bohr's contributions to "Relativistic Quantum Theory". Together with Léon Rosenfeld, Bohr undertook a thorough investigation of the measuring problem in quantum electrodynamics and demonstrated the full accordance between the formalism and the result of idealized thought experiments.

The articles in the second part, although also restricted in scope to the field of physics, address a broader audience. One of the most impressive treatises is Bohr's own account of his debates with Albert Einstein, over more than twenty years, on the consistency, the completeness and the epistemological consequences of quantum mechanics.

Volumes 6 and 7 of the Collected Works are in turn related to the forthcoming Volume 10 which broadens the scope by presenting Bohr's applications of the complementarity argument beyond the domain of physics. Although each volume may be read independently, careful attention should be paid to the interrelationships between each volume in order to appreciate the subtlety of Bohr's continued elaboration and fine-tuning of his complementarity argument.

This volume is divided into five parts. The title of the volume refers primarily to part I, which is by far the largest and comprises papers discussing the fundamental questions of biology and related psychological and philosophical problems. Following the reproduction of papers brought to publication by Bohr, there is a separate Appendix to Part I including some of Bohr's most interesting and substantive unpublished contributions in this area. The papers in Part I span the last thirty years of Bohr's life and display his great interest in biological problems and his unremitting efforts to show that biology cannot be reduced to physics and chemistry.

Part II contains articles of a more general cultural interest. Some of these show that Bohr regarded the complementary perspective to be of value also outside the scientific sphere.

Part III contains the articles Bohr wrote about the great Danish philosopher Harald Høffding. These short papers are presented in a section on their own because of the continuing discussion in the history of science about Høffding's possible influence on Bohr's work in physics and his whole scientific approach.

Part IV comprises articles illuminating the history of 20th century physics. Bohr had great veneration for his predecessors and teachers, and he prepared these articles with great care.

Part V contains correspondence relating to the material in Parts I through IV. As in previous volumes an inventory of relevant unpublished manuscripts held at the Niels Bohr Archive constitutes an appendix to the whole volume.

Part I is devoted to Niels Bohr's mission to promote an "open world" between nations, that is, full sharing of information in the scientific and technical, as well as in the cultural spheres the scientific and technical, as well as in the cultural spheres. He started his mission immediately upon escaping from Nazi-occupied Denmark in the autumn of 1943, when he realized that the bomb was on the way to becoming a reality. As he wrote in 1944, he considered that the existence of the atomic bomb "would not only seem to necessitate but should also, due to the urgency of mutual confidence, facilitate" the realization of an open world. During the Second World War, while being actively involved in the Allied atomic bomb project, Bohr was able to obtain access to Prime Minister Churchill and President Roosevelt to promote his view. After the war he continued his confidential approaches to the statesmen while publishing more generally oriented articles on the issue.
Although Bohr put in as much work in appeals to the statesmen as in his other writings, they were not intended for publication. This has called for the inclusion of a greater number than in earlier volumes of the Collected Works of previously unpublished documents as well as a particularly extensive historical introduction written by the editor. The material adds up to a fascinating sotry of the political dedication and social responsibility ofone of the major scientists of the twentieth century.
Part II documents Bohr's other social and political activities, such as his long-time presidency in the Royal Danish Academy of Sciences and Letters and his promotion of the peaceful uses of atomic energy. Taking a broader approach than most of his other publications, these occasional writings, which are most often published versions of talks at public events, are particularly well suited to present Bohr to the general public, as a thinker as well as a person.



* Niels Bohr
* Open World
* Atomic Bomb Project
* Science and Politics
* Collected Works
* Archival Documents
* Original Photographs

Current research in High Energy Physics focuses on a number of enigmatic issues that go beyond the very successful Standard Model of particle physics. Among these are the problem of neutrino mass, the (as yet) unobserved Higgs particle, the quark-gluon plasma, quantum aspects of gravity, and the so--called hierarchy problem. Satisfactory resolution of these important questions will take much research effort in both theory and experiment. The Science & Engineering Research Council, Department of Science & Technology has sponsored a series of SERC Schools in Theoretical High Energy Physics over the past several years, to provide instruction and training to graduate students working for research degrees. This book is an outcome of the schools held at the Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, Kolkata in 2000, and at the Harish-Chandra Research Institute, Allahabad in 2001. Based on lectures by active researchers in the field---Rajiv Gavai, Debashis Ghoshal, Dileep Jatkar, Anjan Joshipura, Biswarup Mukhopadhyaya, Sreerup Raychaudhuri, Saurabh Rindani, Ashoke Sen and Sandip Trivedi---the nine chapters comprising the book deal with a number of topics that range from the fundamentals of the field, to problems and questions that are at the very forefront of current research. This volume will thus be useful to the advanced graduate student who has familiarity with quantum field theory, the Standard Model, and the general theory of relativity, and will also provide a useful reference for working scientists.
book provides a clear and concise discussion of basic concepts of nuclear physics to be covered in a one semester course in nuclear physics offered in colleges and universities. This course can be taken by physics and nuclear engineering seniors and graduate students, who have taken one semester of quantum mechanics and a course in math. Methods of physics. This book begins with the general properties of nuclei. In chapters 2 and 3 it discusses the nature of nuclear force as learned from the properties of deuteron and from the two body interactions of (n, n ), (n, p) and (p, p) pairs. In chapter 4 it gives discussion of the nuclear structure in terms of different nuclear models such as shell, collective vibration and rotation, unified and liquid drop. The models are applicable in different mass regions of nuclei. In chapter 5, discussion is given about \, and - ray modes of decay of unstable nuclei. Chapter 6 deals with different types of nuclear reactions induced by n, p, d, t, \- particles etc. These reactions are compound nucleus formation, direct reactions, such as stripping, knock out, pick up reactions, photonuclear reactions, nuclear fission and nuclear fusion etc. Chapter 7 gives a brief discussion of application of nuclear physics to other fields such as bio medical, nuclear energy, industry, crime detection and astrophysics. In chapter 8, I have given conceptual problems related to each chapter. The main feature of this book is that it gives a coherent treatment of each topic of nuclear physics in the proper order.


Book Review

Basic concepts of nuclear physics written by Jagadish B. Garg, Physics Professor, State University at Albany is a timely book. To my knowledge no other text book on this subject had been published in recent years. This book is written in a clear, concise and orderly fashion.

The book begins with a discussion of the discovery of nucleus by Lord Rutherford and then describes all the basic properties of nuclei. In chapters 2and 3, the author discusses the nucleon nucleon force determined by properties of deuterons and from interaction of pairs of nucleons. In chapter 4, he discusses nuclear structure as described by shell, collective rotation, vibration, unified and liquid drop models. In chapter 5, he discusses various nuclear modes such as alpha, beta and gamma decay of unstable nuclei, In chapter 6, he discusses nuclear reactions induced by neutrons, protons, deuterons, He 3, He 4 and triton particles, photo nuclear reactions, nuclear fission and fusion. Theoretical treatment of these topics is appropriate for an introductory survey course in nuclear physics. Chapter 7 gives a brief discussion of application of nuclear physics to nuclear energy, to medical field such as diagnostic and treatment of human diseases, application to astro-physics, crime detection and determination of pollution in the environment The author is internationally known for his extensive research on many topics of nuclear physics.

The author should be complimented for a clear and concise discussion of all important topics of nuclear physics. This book is suitable for a one semester survey course in nuclear physics to be given in physics and nuclear engineering departments. I have taught introductory course in nuclear physics at Renssaeler Polytecnique Institute for many years and would have adopted this book if it was then available. I would recommend this book to other professors teaching an introductory survey course on nuclear physics.

- Norman Francis,
Adjunct Professor at RPI(retired)
Fellow of American Nuclear Society
Volume 7 is a direct continuation of Volume 6, which documented the birth of the complementarity argument and its earliest elaborations. It covers the extension and refinement of the complementarity argument from 1933 until Bohrs' death in 1962. All Bohr's publications on the subject, together with selected manuscripts and extracts of his correspondence with friends and fellow pioneers such as Werner Heisenberg and Wolfgang Pauli, are included.

Divided into two, largely independent parts, the volume begins with Bohr's contributions to "Relativistic Quantum Theory". Together with Léon Rosenfeld, Bohr undertook a thorough investigation of the measuring problem in quantum electrodynamics and demonstrated the full accordance between the formalism and the result of idealized thought experiments.

The articles in the second part, although also restricted in scope to the field of physics, address a broader audience. One of the most impressive treatises is Bohr's own account of his debates with Albert Einstein, over more than twenty years, on the consistency, the completeness and the epistemological consequences of quantum mechanics.

Volumes 6 and 7 of the Collected Works are in turn related to the forthcoming Volume 10 which broadens the scope by presenting Bohr's applications of the complementarity argument beyond the domain of physics. Although each volume may be read independently, careful attention should be paid to the interrelationships between each volume in order to appreciate the subtlety of Bohr's continued elaboration and fine-tuning of his complementarity argument.

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