Foe: A Novel

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With the same electrical intensity of language and insight that he brought to Waiting for the Barbarians, J.M. Coetzee reinvents the story of Robinson Crusoe—and in so doing, directs our attention to the seduction and tyranny of storytelling itself.

J.M. Coetzee's latest novel, The Schooldays of Jesus, is now available from Viking. Late Essays: 2006-2016 will be available January 2018. 

In 1720 the eminent man of letters Daniel Foe is approached by Susan Barton, lately a castaway on a desert island. She wants him to tell her story, and that of the enigmatic man who has become her rescuer, companion, master and sometimes lover: Cruso. Cruso is dead, and his manservant, Friday, is incapable of speech. As she tries to relate the truth about him, the ambitious Barton cannot help turning Cruso into her invention. For as narrated by Foe—as by Coetzee himself—the stories we thought we knew acquire depths that are at once treacherous, elegant, and unexpectedly moving.

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About the author

Born in Cape Town, South Africa, on February 9, 1940, John Michael Coetzee studied first at Cape Town and later at the University of Texas at Austin, where he earned a Ph.D. degree in literature. In 1972 he returned to South Africa and joined the faculty of the University of Cape Town. His works of fiction include Dusklands, Waiting for the Barbarians, which won South Africa’s highest literary honor, the Central News Agency Literary Award, and the Life and Times of Michael K., for which Coetzee was awarded his first Booker Prize in 1983. He has also published a memoir, Boyhood: Scenes From a Provincial Life, and several essays collections. He has won many other literary prizes including the Lannan Award for Fiction, the Jerusalem Prize and The Irish Times International Fiction Prize. In 1999 he again won Britain’s prestigious Booker Prize for Disgrace, becoming the first author to win the award twice in its 31-year history. In 2003, Coetzee was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature.
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Additional Information

Publisher
Penguin
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Published on
Feb 7, 2017
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Pages
160
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ISBN
9781524705497
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Features
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Language
English
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Genres
Fiction / Action & Adventure
Fiction / Historical
Fiction / Literary
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Eligible for Family Library

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La nueva novela del Premio Nobel de Literatura J.M. Coetzee, secuela de La infancia de Jesús, es una hermosa historia sobre la identidad, la amistad y la fuerza de los lazos familiares.

«Cuando cruzas el océano en barco, todos los recuerdos se te borran y empiezas una vida completamente nueva. Así es la cosa. No hay nada antes. No hay Historia. El barco amarra en el puerto, bajamos por la pasarela y nos zambullimos en el presente. El tiempo empieza entonces.»

David es un niño que siempre hace preguntas. Simón e Inés, que cuidan de él, intentan responderle de la mejor manera posible. Acaban de instalarse en el pueblo de Estrella para empezar una nueva vida. David ya tiene amigos y su perro Bolívar le hace compañía. Pero, a punto de cumplir siete años, ha llegado el momento de escolarizarlo. Así que lo inscriben en la Academia de Danza. Allí, con sus nuevas zapatillas doradas, aprende a bajar los números del cielo. Pero también descubre algunas cosas terribles que los adultos son capaces de hacer.

En este fascinante relato alegórico, Coetzee se enfrenta con maestría a las grandes cuestiones sobre la infancia, lo que significa ser padre, la constante batalla entre emoción e intelecto y cómo elegimos vivir nuestra vida.

Reseñas:
«Un impresionante, original y hermosísimo modelo de rigor artístico y moral.»
Ignacio Echevarría, El País

«Uno de los mejores premios Nobel de toda la historia.»
ABC

«Coetzee es un clásico porque su escritura ya nos pertenece a todos.»
El Mundo

«Coetzee es uno de los grandes maestros de lo que no se cuenta y de lo que queda implícito.»
The New York Review of Books

«Un autor ascético que encuentra la manera de negarte todo lo que quieres al mismo tiempo que de algún modo te ofrece lo que necesitas.»
The Telegraph

«Oscuramente convincente, a menudo muy divertida, llena de profundidades repentinas. [...] Una obra formada por muchas verdades pequeñas pero significativas.»
The Guardian

J.M. Coetzee
Writers from Alice Walker to Michael Ondaatje to Claire Messud share their thoughts on one of the most vital gatherings of writers and readers in the world.

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Celebrating the tenth anniversary of PalFest, This Is Not a Border is a collection of essays, poems, and sketches from some of the world's most distinguished artists, responding to their experiences at this unique festival. Both heartbreaking and hopeful, their gathered work is a testament to the power of literature to promote solidarity and hope in the most desperate of situations.

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