The 50 Greatest Dodgers Games of All Time

Riverdale Avenue Books LLC
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The Dodgers have played more than 10,000 games as a franchise. Their 50 greatest games span two coasts and three centuries worth of baseball. They include:

• A doubleheader that lasted six and a half innings combined
• A single game that featured three teams on the field
• A game in which the Dodgers didn’t record a hit – and won
• The games in which the single-season and career home run records were broken
• Three perfect games and two no-hitters
• The longest game in major league history
• The first major league game ever televised
• A game in which the Dodgers’ pitcher lost consciousness on the field
• An exhibition game that drew 93,103 spectators
• The first integrated game in major league history

The 50 Greatest Dodgers Games features all the best players to don the uniform: Sandy Koufax, Jackie Robinson, Kirk Gibson, Zack Wheat, Fernando Valenzuela, Orel Hershiser, Duke Snider, Roy Campanella, Clayton Kershaw, Steve Garvey, Don Drysdale, Pee Wee Reese and more. It also features some of the unsung heroes of baseball history, like Cookie Lavagetto, Vic Davalillo, Sandy Amoros, Al Gionfriddo and Joe McGinnity.

For the first time, their performances are laid side-by-side in this account of the greatest Dodgers games ever played. Which game ranks number one?

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About the author

J.P. Hoornstra reports on the Dodgers for the Los Angeles News Group. He has written about sports and travel for more than a dozen newspapers and several periodicals since he was an undergraduate psychology student at UCLA. His interview subjects include some of the most famous names in sports, music and entertainment, as well as experts in medicine, psychology, architecture and business. When he is not writing at the ballpark, he is at home in Los Angeles ... writing.
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Additional Information

Riverdale Avenue Books LLC
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Published on
May 28, 2015
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Best For
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Sports & Recreation / Baseball / General
Sports & Recreation / Baseball / History
Sports & Recreation / Baseball / Statistics
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Eligible for Family Library

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