Burning Submission

Etopia Press
1

Sometimes submission can be hot...

 

Vicki’s never had a problem standing up for herself. So when a meathead at the gym grabs her butt, she has no problem punching him in the face. Gavin, the gorgeous gym owner, throws the guy out, and his tender, but insistent demand to tend to her injured hand makes Vicki hot. The buff, sex-god-come-to-life is everything she’s ever wanted, and he’s only too happy to show her how good sex can be.

 

Gavin is entranced by the feisty woman, even though he already has more than enough on his hands with the gym and his work as a volunteer fire fighter. The last thing he needs is this bundle of contained fury tossed in his lap, but something about her calls to his inner Dominant. Not only that, her body responds to him like no other. But when he discovers someone is stalking her, it’s no longer all fun and games. Submission is all about trust...and after a brutal attack, trust is the last thing Vicki is willing to give...to anyone.

 

Reader note: contains light BDSM, spanking, and submission elements

 

Keywords: spanking, dominance, submission, erotic romance, contemporary, fire fighter, alpha male

Read more

About the author

J. Richards is a loving spouse to a sexy military man, she loves bouncing around the country, meeting new people and letting their very different live inspire her. Everywhere they travel is so very different from the small town in New Hampshire which she was born and raised. She is a stay-at-home mom of one wild child who fills her heart and soul with joy and turmoil everyday!

Read more
5.0
1 total
Loading...

Additional Information

Publisher
Etopia Press
Read more
Published on
Jul 3, 2015
Read more
Pages
160
Read more
ISBN
9781941692882
Read more
Read more
Language
English
Read more
Genres
Fiction / Erotica / BDSM
Fiction / Romance / Contemporary
Fiction / Romance / Erotica
Read more
Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
Read more
Read Aloud
Available on Android devices
Read more

Reading information

Smartphones and Tablets

Install the Google Play Books app for Android and iPad/iPhone. It syncs automatically with your account and allows you to read online or offline wherever you are.

Laptops and Computers

You can read books purchased on Google Play using your computer's web browser.

eReaders and other devices

To read on e-ink devices like the Sony eReader or Barnes & Noble Nook, you'll need to download a file and transfer it to your device. Please follow the detailed Help center instructions to transfer the files to supported eReaders.
"All art should become science and all science art; poetry and philosophy should be made one." Friedrich Schlegel's words perfectly capture the project of the German Romantics, who believed that the aesthetic approaches of art and literature could reveal patterns and meaning in nature that couldn't be uncovered through rationalistic philosophy and science alone. In this wide-ranging work, Robert J. Richards shows how the Romantic conception of the world influenced (and was influenced by) both the lives of the people who held it and the development of nineteenth-century science.

Integrating Romantic literature, science, and philosophy with an intimate knowledge of the individuals involved—from Goethe and the brothers Schlegel to Humboldt and Friedrich and Caroline Schelling—Richards demonstrates how their tempestuous lives shaped their ideas as profoundly as their intellectual and cultural heritage. He focuses especially on how Romantic concepts of the self, as well as aesthetic and moral considerations—all tempered by personal relationships—altered scientific representations of nature. Although historians have long considered Romanticism at best a minor tributary to scientific thought, Richards moves it to the center of the main currents of nineteenth-century biology, culminating in the conception of nature that underlies Darwin's evolutionary theory.

Uniting the personal and poetic aspects of philosophy and science in a way that the German Romantics themselves would have honored, The Romantic Conception of Life alters how we look at Romanticism and nineteenth-century biology.
Did Darwin see evolution as progressive, directed toward producing ever more advanced forms of life? Most contemporary scholars say no. In this challenge to prevailing views, Robert J. Richards says yes—and argues that current perspectives on Darwin and his theory are both ideologically motivated and scientifically unsound.

This provocative new reading of Darwin goes directly to the origins of evolutionary theory. Unlike most contemporary biologists or historians and philosophers of science, Richards holds that Darwin did concern himself with the idea of progress, or telos, as he constructed his theory. Richards maintains that Darwin drew on the traditional embryological meanings of the terms "evolution" and "descent with modification." In the 1600s and 1700s, "evolution" referred to the embryological theory of preformation, the idea that the embryo exists as a miniature adult of its own species that simply grows, or evolves, during gestation. By the early 1800s, however, the idea of preformation had become the concept of evolutionary recapitulation, the idea that during its development an embryo passes through a series of stages, each the adult form of an ancestor species.

Richards demonstrates that, for Darwin, embryological recapitulation provided a graphic model of how species evolve. If an embryo could be seen as successively taking the structures and forms of its ancestral species, then one could see the evolution of life itself as a succession of species, each transformed from its ancestor. Richards works with the Origin and other published and archival material to show that these embryological models were much on Darwin's mind as he considered the evidence for descent with modification.

Why do so many modern researchers find these embryological roots of Darwin's theory so problematic? Richards argues that the current tendency to see evolution as a process that is not progressive and not teleological imposes perspectives on Darwin that incorrectly deny the clearly progressive heart of his embryological models and his evolutionary theory.
©2018 GoogleSite Terms of ServicePrivacyDevelopersArtistsAbout Google|Location: United StatesLanguage: English (United States)
By purchasing this item, you are transacting with Google Payments and agreeing to the Google Payments Terms of Service and Privacy Notice.