King of the Slots: William "Si" Redd: William "Si" Redd

ABC-CLIO
3
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King of the Slots: William "Si" Redd relates the fascinating, only-in-America success story of one man's improbable rise from the depths of poverty to the heights of international commerce and dazzling wealth. William Silas "Si" Redd is recognized as one of the most important and influential persons in the gaming industry over the past half century. The company he founded, International Game Technology (IGT), is the world leader in the manufacture of gaming equipment and gaming software features. His video poker is the most popular slot machine since the original debuted in 1899.

King of the Slots covers the life (1911-2003) and rags-to-riches story of the man who changed the face of the casino gaming industry. Both a business book and a biography, it introduces readers to the nation's leading gaming centers, Apollo-era technology and how it changed gambling, and the race to perfect the first video poker game. It also gives them a chance to meet the characters with whom Redd rubbed shoulders, including Howard Hughes, Mafia capo Raymond Patriarca, Arizona cowboy and pig farmer Jimmie Hughes, gaming legend Bill Harrah, and casino visionary Jay Sarno.

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About the author

Jack Harpster worked in business management in the newspaper industry for 43 years.

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Reviews

2.3
3 total
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Additional Information

Publisher
ABC-CLIO
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Published on
May 5, 2010
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Pages
273
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ISBN
9780313382093
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Language
English
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Genres
Biography & Autobiography / Business
Business & Economics / Corporate & Business History
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Read Aloud
Available on Android devices
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Eligible for Family Library

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Jack Harpster
William Butler Ogden was a pioneer railroad magnate, one of the earliest founders and developers of the city of Chicago, and an important influence on U.S. westward expansion. His career as a businessman stretched from the streets of Chicago to the wilds of the Wisconsin lumber forests, from the iron mines of Pennsylvania to the financial capitals in New York and beyond. Jack Harpster’ s The Railroad Tycoon Who Built Chicago: A Biography of William B. Ogden is the first biography of one of the most notable figures in nineteenth-century America.

Harpster traces the life of Ogden from his early experiences as a boy and young businessman in upstate New York to his migration to Chicago, where he invested in land, canal construction, and steamboat companies. He became Chicago’ s first mayor, built the city’ s first railway system, and suffered through the Great Chicago Fire. He had diverse business interests that included real estate, land development, city planning, urban transportation, manufacturing, beer brewing, mining, and banking, to name just a few. Harpster, however, does not simply focus on the business mogul; he delves into the heart and soul of the man himself— Ogden was a dedicated family man, a noted raconteur, a respected philanthropist, and a friend to many of the era’ s rich and powerful.

The Railroad Tycoon Who Built Chicago is a meticulously researched and nuanced biography set against the backdrop of the historical and societal themes of the nineteenth century. It is a sweeping story about one man’ s impact on the birth of commerce in America. Ogden’ s private life proves to be as varied and interesting as his public persona, and Harpster weaves the two together into a colorful tapestry of a life well and usefully lived.

Jack Harpster
"Jack Harpster and Ken Stalter's Captive! is a rich, thorough, and riveting retelling of David Ogden's harrowing capture by the feared and fascinating Iroquois chief, Joseph Brant, during the Revolutionary War. Ogden, a 16-year-old American woodsman and Patriot soldier, who was captured in three feet of snow next to a soldier who had been shot and scalped, was mocked by the British, stoned by the Iroquois and adopted by the Senecas. His ordeal and escape---an unmatched run for freedom---will keep you on the edge of your seat." Dean King Author of Skeletons on the Zahara and Unbound

"Spurred by curiosity and compassion, with extensive historical research and some imagination, Harpster and Stalter place a once-sensationalized captivity narrative on solid ground. They help us enter a world very far away from our own, and at least begin to understand." Ray Raphael Author of Founders: The People Who Brought You a Nation; A People's History of the American Revolution: How Common People Shaped the Fight for Independence; and a number of other noteworthy books on American history

"Jack Harpster and Ken Stalter provide a vivid, fresh look at a familiar genre, the `Indian captivity narrative' through David Ogden's experiences with the Iroquois during the Revolutionary War, with historical context lacking in the original account, published in 1840. This book is a treat to read that also makes compelling history." Bruce E. Johansen Professor of Communication and Native American Studies, University of Nebraska at Omaha

Captive! The Story of David Ogden and the Iroquois is a gripping, true adventure story of one young colonial soldier's bravery and determination during the Revolutionary War, and many years later during the War of 1812.

David Ogden was born into an unusually tumultuous time in America. The colonials were struggling to throw off the yoke of British rule while also battling the Iroquois tribes for control of their ancestral homelands. At age 14, as a homesteader with his family on the New York frontier, Ogden narrowly escaped the Iroquois' notorious Cherry Valley Massacre by crawling through a small firewood passageway and slipping away. At 16 he joined the Continental Army, and was captured while on a woodcutting detail by an Iroquois war party.

Following a grueling 10-day winter march across New York, Ogden was adopted by a Seneca Indian family and held in virtual captivity for more than two years. Finally, he chose a daunting 126-mile race to freedom, fraught with the risk of death over being assimilated into an alien society. Three decades later, Ogden survived the brutal battle of Queenston Heights in the War of 1812, in which 500 of his comrades died, and 925---including Ogden---were taken prisoner. But Ogden was more than just lucky---he was also extremely resourceful, tough, and determined.

The biography of anyone who survived two wars and the formation of a new nation would be compelling, but David Ogden's story stands alone, even within the historical context of his times. His story was originally told in an 1840 Indian captivity narrative, which is included in its entirety in the appendix. It is retold here with all the factual historical information and colorful detail that were missing from the original, along with many maps and illustrations. It also accurately retains the flavor of the period and the voice of the 18th-century protagonist
Jim Collins
The Challenge
Built to Last, the defining management study of the nineties, showed how great companies triumph over time and how long-term sustained performance can be engineered into the DNA of an enterprise from the verybeginning.

But what about the company that is not born with great DNA? How can good companies, mediocre companies, even bad companies achieve enduring greatness?

The Study
For years, this question preyed on the mind of Jim Collins. Are there companies that defy gravity and convert long-term mediocrity or worse into long-term superiority? And if so, what are the universal distinguishing characteristics that cause a company to go from good to great?

The Standards
Using tough benchmarks, Collins and his research team identified a set of elite companies that made the leap to great results and sustained those results for at least fifteen years. How great? After the leap, the good-to-great companies generated cumulative stock returns that beat the general stock market by an average of seven times in fifteen years, better than twice the results delivered by a composite index of the world's greatest companies, including Coca-Cola, Intel, General Electric, and Merck.

The Comparisons
The research team contrasted the good-to-great companies with a carefully selected set of comparison companies that failed to make the leap from good to great. What was different? Why did one set of companies become truly great performers while the other set remained only good?

Over five years, the team analyzed the histories of all twenty-eight companies in the study. After sifting through mountains of data and thousands of pages of interviews, Collins and his crew discovered the key determinants of greatness -- why some companies make the leap and others don't.

The Findings
The findings of the Good to Great study will surprise many readers and shed light on virtually every area of management strategy and practice. The findings include:

Level 5 Leaders: The research team was shocked to discover the type of leadership required to achieve greatness. The Hedgehog Concept (Simplicity within the Three Circles): To go from good to great requires transcending the curse of competence. A Culture of Discipline: When you combine a culture of discipline with an ethic of entrepreneurship, you get the magical alchemy of great results. Technology Accelerators: Good-to-great companies think differently about the role of technology. The Flywheel and the Doom Loop: Those who launch radical change programs and wrenching restructurings will almost certainly fail to make the leap.

“Some of the key concepts discerned in the study,” comments Jim Collins, "fly in the face of our modern business culture and will, quite frankly, upset some people.”

Perhaps, but who can afford to ignore these findings?

Jack Harpster
William Butler Ogden was a pioneer railroad magnate, one of the earliest founders and developers of the city of Chicago, and an important influence on U.S. westward expansion. His career as a businessman stretched from the streets of Chicago to the wilds of the Wisconsin lumber forests, from the iron mines of Pennsylvania to the financial capitals in New York and beyond. Jack Harpster’ s The Railroad Tycoon Who Built Chicago: A Biography of William B. Ogden is the first biography of one of the most notable figures in nineteenth-century America.

Harpster traces the life of Ogden from his early experiences as a boy and young businessman in upstate New York to his migration to Chicago, where he invested in land, canal construction, and steamboat companies. He became Chicago’ s first mayor, built the city’ s first railway system, and suffered through the Great Chicago Fire. He had diverse business interests that included real estate, land development, city planning, urban transportation, manufacturing, beer brewing, mining, and banking, to name just a few. Harpster, however, does not simply focus on the business mogul; he delves into the heart and soul of the man himself— Ogden was a dedicated family man, a noted raconteur, a respected philanthropist, and a friend to many of the era’ s rich and powerful.

The Railroad Tycoon Who Built Chicago is a meticulously researched and nuanced biography set against the backdrop of the historical and societal themes of the nineteenth century. It is a sweeping story about one man’ s impact on the birth of commerce in America. Ogden’ s private life proves to be as varied and interesting as his public persona, and Harpster weaves the two together into a colorful tapestry of a life well and usefully lived.

Jack Harpster
"Jack Harpster and Ken Stalter's Captive! is a rich, thorough, and riveting retelling of David Ogden's harrowing capture by the feared and fascinating Iroquois chief, Joseph Brant, during the Revolutionary War. Ogden, a 16-year-old American woodsman and Patriot soldier, who was captured in three feet of snow next to a soldier who had been shot and scalped, was mocked by the British, stoned by the Iroquois and adopted by the Senecas. His ordeal and escape---an unmatched run for freedom---will keep you on the edge of your seat." Dean King Author of Skeletons on the Zahara and Unbound

"Spurred by curiosity and compassion, with extensive historical research and some imagination, Harpster and Stalter place a once-sensationalized captivity narrative on solid ground. They help us enter a world very far away from our own, and at least begin to understand." Ray Raphael Author of Founders: The People Who Brought You a Nation; A People's History of the American Revolution: How Common People Shaped the Fight for Independence; and a number of other noteworthy books on American history

"Jack Harpster and Ken Stalter provide a vivid, fresh look at a familiar genre, the `Indian captivity narrative' through David Ogden's experiences with the Iroquois during the Revolutionary War, with historical context lacking in the original account, published in 1840. This book is a treat to read that also makes compelling history." Bruce E. Johansen Professor of Communication and Native American Studies, University of Nebraska at Omaha

Captive! The Story of David Ogden and the Iroquois is a gripping, true adventure story of one young colonial soldier's bravery and determination during the Revolutionary War, and many years later during the War of 1812.

David Ogden was born into an unusually tumultuous time in America. The colonials were struggling to throw off the yoke of British rule while also battling the Iroquois tribes for control of their ancestral homelands. At age 14, as a homesteader with his family on the New York frontier, Ogden narrowly escaped the Iroquois' notorious Cherry Valley Massacre by crawling through a small firewood passageway and slipping away. At 16 he joined the Continental Army, and was captured while on a woodcutting detail by an Iroquois war party.

Following a grueling 10-day winter march across New York, Ogden was adopted by a Seneca Indian family and held in virtual captivity for more than two years. Finally, he chose a daunting 126-mile race to freedom, fraught with the risk of death over being assimilated into an alien society. Three decades later, Ogden survived the brutal battle of Queenston Heights in the War of 1812, in which 500 of his comrades died, and 925---including Ogden---were taken prisoner. But Ogden was more than just lucky---he was also extremely resourceful, tough, and determined.

The biography of anyone who survived two wars and the formation of a new nation would be compelling, but David Ogden's story stands alone, even within the historical context of his times. His story was originally told in an 1840 Indian captivity narrative, which is included in its entirety in the appendix. It is retold here with all the factual historical information and colorful detail that were missing from the original, along with many maps and illustrations. It also accurately retains the flavor of the period and the voice of the 18th-century protagonist
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