Daddy Lost His Head: And Other Stories

Fantagraphics Books
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In this collection of twisty EC tales, there are scheming spouses, vampires, voodoo, and an ancient mummy’s curse! Famed for his deft delineations of beautiful, scheming women, handsome jealous husbands, and not-so-innocent children, Kamen returns with a collection of classic EC horror tales from The Vault of Horror, Tales From the Crypt, and The Haunt of Fear. In the title tale, a cruel stepfather sends his stepdaughter to bed without her supper, but the old crone next door gives the hungry girl a candy figure made in the likeness of her father … In “What the Dog Dragged In” ― one of the EC’s earliest adaptations of a Ray Bradbury story ― a wheelchair-bound blind woman asks her faithful dog to go find her fiancé, unaware that he had been killed in an auto accident… In “Loved to Death,” a rejected suitor spends one dollar to buy a potion that makes a woman fall in love with him, but when it works too well he discovers the price of the antidote is more than he can afford … Plus over 20 more tales of madness and horror as only EC can do them!
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About the author

The Brooklyn-born Jack Kamen (1920-2008) began his career as a pulp illustrator and spent his last professional decades as an illustrator, but is best remembered for his half-decade at EC (and his 1982 contributions to the EC-inspired movie Creepshow).

Albert B. Feldstein (1925-2014) was an American writer,editor, and artist, best known for his work at EC Comics (particularly in the science fiction genre) and, from 1956 to1985, as the editor of the satirical magazine Mad.

Ray Bradbury was born in Waukegan, Illinois, in 1920. Growing up during the Great Depression, Bradbury began writing at the age of 11. Unable to join the military in World War II due to his poor eyesight, he began publishing science fiction stories. In 1947 he married Marguerite McClure and they had four daughters. His career as a writer included such notable works as Fahrenheit 451, The Martian Chronicles, and I Sing The Body Electric. Primarily known for his successes in science fiction, Bradbury also worked on various horror and mystery stories, as well as screenplays and television scripts. During his lifetime he received numerous awards, including a Pulitzer in 2007. Bradbury passed away in 2012.

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Additional Information

Publisher
Fantagraphics Books
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Published on
Oct 4, 2017
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Pages
192
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ISBN
9781683960508
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Best For
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Language
English
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Genres
Comics & Graphic Novels / Anthologies
Comics & Graphic Novels / Literary
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Eligible for Family Library

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Jack Kamen
With his wholesome approach, Jack Kamen stood out amongst the grandguignol grunge, gritty realism, or futuristic dazzle of his fellow EC cartoonists ― but his brilliant editor/writer Al Feldstein found a way to exploit the surface innocence of his style with seemingly nice stories of romance gone horribly wrong, or future fantasies with an unexpectedly brutal twist. And nowhere did Kamen’s clean-but-lush graphics work better than in the stories he created for EC’s science-fiction comics. The title story, “Zero Hour” (one of three in this book adapted from works by Ray Bradbury), set in a Spielbergian suburban idyll, is particularly well served by Kamen’s surface innocence; “A Lesson in Anatomy” works similar magic, with its Mayberry-esque setting veering into alien-invasion terror. If there was any devil in Kamen, it came out in his loving depiction of the female face and form, and you could see why his hapless heroes were often fatally entranced with them ― as in “Punishment Without Crime” (Bradbury again), “He Who Waits!” (a scientist finds an extreme way of rejoining his eight-inch-tall inamorata), and “Miscalculation!” (the lucky recipient of a package from the future literally brews his own harem); even the supercomputer in “Only Human!” proves vulnerable to a beautiful woman’s charms. Zero Hour And Other Stories contains 22 classic EC yarns ― plus the usual all-new biographical, historical, and critical essays that have made Fantagraphics’ EC Library series the ultimate version of these classics.
Jack Kamen
With his wholesome approach, Jack Kamen stood out amongst the grandguignol grunge, gritty realism, or futuristic dazzle of his fellow EC cartoonists ― but his brilliant editor/writer Al Feldstein found a way to exploit the surface innocence of his style with seemingly nice stories of romance gone horribly wrong, or future fantasies with an unexpectedly brutal twist. And nowhere did Kamen’s clean-but-lush graphics work better than in the stories he created for EC’s science-fiction comics. The title story, “Zero Hour” (one of three in this book adapted from works by Ray Bradbury), set in a Spielbergian suburban idyll, is particularly well served by Kamen’s surface innocence; “A Lesson in Anatomy” works similar magic, with its Mayberry-esque setting veering into alien-invasion terror. If there was any devil in Kamen, it came out in his loving depiction of the female face and form, and you could see why his hapless heroes were often fatally entranced with them ― as in “Punishment Without Crime” (Bradbury again), “He Who Waits!” (a scientist finds an extreme way of rejoining his eight-inch-tall inamorata), and “Miscalculation!” (the lucky recipient of a package from the future literally brews his own harem); even the supercomputer in “Only Human!” proves vulnerable to a beautiful woman’s charms. Zero Hour And Other Stories contains 22 classic EC yarns ― plus the usual all-new biographical, historical, and critical essays that have made Fantagraphics’ EC Library series the ultimate version of these classics.
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