Fifty Famous Stories Retold

Famous People

Book 7
谷月社
2
Free sample

 

There are numerous time-honored stories which have become so incorporated into the literature and thought of our race that a knowledge of them is an indispensable part of one's education. These stories are of several different classes. To one class belong the popular fairy tales which have delighted untold generations of children, and will continue to delight them to the end of time. To another class belong the limited number of fables that have come down to us through many channels from hoar antiquity. To a third belong the charming stories of olden times that are derived from the literatures of ancient peoples, such as the Greeks and the Hebrews. A fourth class includes the half-legendary tales of a distinctly later origin, which have for their subjects certain romantic episodes in the lives of well-known heroes and famous men, or in the history of a people.

It is to this last class that most of the fifty stories contained in the present volume belong. As a matter of course, some of these stories are better known, and therefore more famous, than others. Some have a slight historical value; some are useful as giving point to certain great moral truths; others are products solely of the fancy, and are intended only to amuse. Some are derived from very ancient sources, and are current in the literature of many lands; some have come to us through the ballads and folk tales of the English people; a few are of quite recent origin; nearly all are the subjects of frequent allusions in poetry and prose and in the conversation of educated people. Care has been taken to exclude everything that is not strictly within the limits of probability; hence there is here no trespassing upon the domain of the fairy tale, the fable, or the myth.

That children naturally take a deep interest in such stories, no person can deny; that the reading of them will not only give pleasure, but will help to lay the foundation for broader literary studies, can scarcely be doubted. It is believed, therefore, that the present collection will be found to possess an educative value which will commend it as a supplementary reader in the middle primary grades at school. It is also hoped that the book will prove so attractive that it will be in demand out of school as well as in.

Acknowledgments are due to Mrs. Charles A. Lane, by whom eight or ten of the stories were suggested.

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About the author

James Baldwin (1841–1925) was born in Indiana, United States and made a career as an educator and administrator in that state starting at the age of 24. He served as the superintendent of Indiana's school system for eighteen years and then went on to become a widely published textbook editor and children's author in the subjects of legends, mythology, biography, and literature, among others.

James Baldwin was one of the most prolific authors of school books for children at the end of the 19th century and the beginning of the 20th. In addition to the Baldwin Readers (1897), he co‐authored the Harper Readers (1888) and the Expressive Readers (1911). He wrote over thirty books about famous people in history and retold classical stories.

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Additional Information

Publisher
谷月社
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Published on
Nov 27, 2015
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Pages
186
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Language
English
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Genres
Fiction / Action & Adventure
Fiction / Literary
Juvenile Fiction / Mysteries & Detective Stories
Literary Collections / General
Literary Criticism / Short Stories
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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 DESCRIBED BY GREAT WRITERS
(BORDONE)
THÉOPHILE GAUTIER
THE BIRTH OF VENUS
(BOTTICELLI)
WALTER PATER
THE QUEEN OF SHEBA
(VERONESE)
JOHN RUSKIN
THE LAST JUDGEMENT
(MICHAEL ANGELO)
ALEXANDRE DUMAS
FOOTNOTES:
MAGDALEN IN THE DESERT
(CORREGGIO)
AIMÉ GIRON
BANQUET OF THE ARQUEBUSIERS
(VAN DER HELST)
WILLIAM MAKEPEACE THACKERAY
(WATTEAU)
EDMOND AND JULES DE GONCOURT
THE SISTINE MADONNA
(RAPHAEL)
F.A. GRUYER
THE DREAM OF ST. URSULA
(CARPACCIO)
JOHN RUSKIN
FOOTNOTES:
THE DESCENT FROM THE CROSS
(RUBENS)
EUGÈNE FROMENTIN
BACCHUS AND ARIADNE
(TITIAN)
CHARLES LAMB
BACCHUS AND ARIADNE
(TITIAN)
EDWARD T. COOK
FOOTNOTES:
THE CORONATION OF THE VIRGIN
(FRA ANGELICO)
THÉOPHILE GAUTIER
JUDITH
(SANDRO BOTTICELLI)
MAURICE HEWLETT
THE AVENUE OF MIDDELHARNAIS
(HOBBEMA)
PAUL LAFOND
(ANDREA DEL SARTO)
ALGERNON CHARLES SWINBURNE
ADORATION OF THE MAGI
(GENTILE DA FABRIANO)
F.A. GRUYER
FOOTNOTES:
PORTRAIT OF GEORG GISZE
(HOLBEIN)
ANTONY VALABRÈGUE
FOOTNOTES:
PARADISE
(TINTORET)
JOHN RUSKIN
AURORA
(GUIDO RENI)
CHARLOTTE A. EATON
AURORA
(GUIDO RENI)
JOHN CONSTABLE
THE ASSUMPTION OF THE VIRGIN
(TITIAN)
THÉOPHILE GAUTIER
THE NIGHT WATCH
(REMBRANDT)
EUGÈNE FROMENTIN
THE RAPE OF HELEN
(BENOZZO GOZZOLI)
COSMO MONKHOUSE
MONNA LISA9
(LEONARDO DA VINCI)
WALTER PATER
FOOTNOTES:
THE ADORATION OF THE LAMB
(VAN EYCK)
KUGLER
FOOTNOTES:
THE DEATH OF PROCRIS
(PIERO DI COSIMO)
EDWARD T. COOK
THE DEATH OF PROCRIS
(PIERO DI COSIMO)
JOHN ADDINGTON SYMONDS
FOOTNOTES:
THE MARRIAGE IN CANA
(TINTORET)
JOHN RUSKIN
MADAME DE POMPADOUR
(DE LA TOUR)
CHARLES-AUGUSTIN SAINTE-BEUVE
FOOTNOTES:
THE HAY WAIN
(CONSTABLE)
C.L. BURNS
THE SURRENDER OF BREDA
(VELASQUEZ)
THÉOPHILE GAUTIER
FOOTNOTES:
THE IMMACULATE CONCEPTION
(MURILLO)
AIMÉ GIRON
ST. FRANCIS BEFORE THE SOLDAN
(GIOTTO)
JOHN RUSKIN
FOOTNOTES:
LILITH
(ROSSETTI)
ALGERNON CHARLES SWINBURNE
ADORATION OF THE MAGI
(DÜRER)
MORIZ THAUSING
MARRIAGE A-LA-MODE
(HOGARTH)
AUSTIN DOBSON
FOOTNOTES:
THE MADONNA OF THE ROCKS
(LEONARDO DA VINCI)
THÉOPHILE GAUTIER
FOOTNOTES:
BEATRICE CENCI
(GUIDO RENI)
PERCY BYSSHE SHELLEY
THE TRANSFIGURATION
(RAPHAEL)
MRS. JAMESON
THE BULL
(PAUL POTTER)
EUGÈNE FROMENTIN
CORÉSUS AND CALLIRHOÉ
(FRAGONARD)
EDMOND AND JULES DE GONCOURT
FOOTNOTES:
THE MARKET-CART
(GAINSBOROUGH)
RICHARD AND SAMUEL REDGRAVE
BACCHUS AND ARIADNE
(TINTORET)
HIPPOLYTE ADOLPHE TAINE
FOOTNOTES:
BACCHUS AND ARIADNE
ANONYMOUS
LA CRUCHE CASSÉE
(GREUZE)
THÉOPHILE GAUTIER
(REYNOLDS)
FREDERIC G. STEPHENS
FOOTNOTES:
ST. CECILIA
(RAPHAEL)
PERCY BYSSHE SHELLEY
THE LAST SUPPER
(LEONARDO DA VINCI)
JOHANN WOLFGANG VON GOETHE
THE CHILDREN OF CHARLES I.
(VAN DYCK)
JULES GUIFFREY
(TURNER)
JOHN RUSKIN
FOOTNOTES:
SPRING
(BOTTICELLI)
MARCEL REYMOND
FOOTNOTES:
 

Dean Swift said that the man who makes two blades of grass grow where one grew before serves well of his kind. Considering how much grass there is in the world and comparatively how little fun, we think that a still more deserving person is the man who makes many laughs grow where none grew before.

Sometimes it happens that the biggest crop of laugh is produced by a man who ranks among the greatest and wisest. Such a man was Abraham Lincoln whose wholesome fun mixed with true philosophy made thousands laugh and think at the same time. He was a firm believer in the saying, "Laugh and the world laughs with you."

Whenever Abraham Lincoln wanted to make a strong point he usually began by saying, "Now, that reminds me of a story." And when he had told a story every one saw the point and was put into a good humor.

The ancients had Aesop and his fables. The moderns had Abraham Lincoln and his stories.

Aesop's Fables have been printed in book form in almost every language and millions have read them with pleasure and profit. Lincoln's stories were scattered in the recollections of thousands of people in various parts of the country. The historians who wrote histories of Lincoln's life remembered only a few of them, but the most of Lincoln's stories and the best of them remained unwritten. More than five years ago the author of this book conceived the idea of collecting all the yarns and stories, the droll sayings, and witty and humorous anecdotes of Abraham Lincoln into one large book, and this volume is the result of that idea.

 

The world is so taken up of late with novels and romances, that it will be hard for a private history to be taken for genuine, where the names and other circumstances of the person are concealed, and on this account we must be content to leave the reader to pass his own opinion upon the ensuing sheet, and take it just as he pleases.

The author is here supposed to be writing her own history, and in the very beginning of her account she gives the reasons why she thinks fit to conceal her true name, after which there is no occasion to say any more about that.

It is true that the original of this story is put into new words, and the style of the famous lady we here speak of is a little altered; particularly she is made to tell her own tale in modester words that she told it at first, the copy which came first to hand having been written in language more like one still in Newgate than one grown penitent and humble, as she afterwards pretends to be.

The pen employed in finishing her story, and making it what you now see it to be, has had no little difficulty to put it into a dress fit to be seen, and to make it speak language fit to be read. When a woman debauched from her youth, nay, even being the offspring of debauchery and vice, comes to give an account of all her vicious practices, and even to descend to the particular occasions and circumstances by which she ran through in threescore years, an author must be hard put to it wrap it up so clean as not to give room, especially for vicious readers, to turn it to his disadvantage.

 

A very irritating thing has happened. My hired man, a certain Barney O'Rourke, an American citizen of much political influence, a good gardener, and, according to his lights, a gentleman, has got very much the best of me, and all because of certain effusions which from time to time have emanated from my pen. It is not often that one's literary chickens come home to roost in such a vengeful fashion as some of mine have recently done, and I have no doubt that as this story progresses he who reads will find much sympathy for me rising up in his breast. As the matter stands, I am torn with conflicting emotions. I am very fond of Barney, and I have always found him truthful hitherto, but exactly what to believe now I hardly know.

The main thing to bring my present trouble upon me, I am forced to believe, is the fact that my house has been in the past, and may possibly still be, haunted. Why my house should be haunted at all I do not know, for it has never been the scene of any tragedy that I am aware of. I built it myself, and it is paid for. So far as I am aware, nothing awful of a material nature has ever happened within its walls, and yet it appears to be, for the present at any rate, a sort of club-house for inconsiderate if not strictly horrid things, which is a most unfair dispensation of the fates, for I have not deserved it. If I were in any sense a Bluebeard, and spent my days cutting ladies' throats as a pastime; if I had a pleasing habit of inviting friends up from town over Sunday, and dropping them into oubliettes connecting my library with dark, dank, and snaky subterranean dungeons; if guests who dine at my house came with a feeling that the chances were, they would never return to their families alive—it might be different. I shouldn't and couldn't blame a house for being haunted if it were the dwelling-place of a bloodthirsty ruffian such as I have indicated, but that is just what it is not. It is not the home of a lover of fearful crimes. I would not walk ten feet for the pleasure of killing any man, no matter who he is. On the contrary, I would walk twenty feet to avoid doing it, if the emergency should ever arise, aye, even if it were that fiend who sits next me at the opera and hums the opera through from beginning to end. There have been times, I must confess, when I have wished I might have had the oubliettes to which I have referred constructed beneath my library and leading to the coal-bins or to some long-forgotten well, but that was two or three years ago, when I was in politics for a brief period, and delegations of willing and thirsty voters were daily and nightly swarming in through every one of the sixteen doors on the ground-floor of my house, which my architect, in a riotous moment, smuggled into the plans in the guise of "French windows." I shouldn't have minded then if the earth had opened up and swallowed my whole party, so long as I did not have to go with them, but under such provocation as I had I do not feel that my residence is justified in being haunted after its present fashion because such a notion entered my mind. We cannot help our thoughts, much less our notions, and punishment for that which we cannot help is not in strict accord with latter-day ideas of justice....

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