The Element of Need: Penguin Specials

Penguin Group Australia

Beneath its peaceful exterior the city of Adelaide has a dark history. From the disappearance of the Beaumont children to the Snowtown killings in the 1990s, it has been home to a long series of brutal and baffling killings and abductions. In The Element of Need, acclaimed author James Bradley uses this long history of violence as the basis of a fascinating exploration not just of his own childhood and adolescence, but of the psychic landscape of this most haunted of cities.
Read more

About the author

James Bradley is the author of three novels, Wrack, The Deep Field and The Resurrectionist, and a book of poetry, Paper Nautilus. His books have won or been shortlisted for a number of major Australian and international literary awards and have been widely translated. He blogs at cityoftongues.com.

Read more

Reviews

Loading...

Additional Information

Publisher
Penguin Group Australia
Read more
Published on
Aug 16, 2012
Read more
Pages
13
Read more
ISBN
9781742537993
Read more
Features
Read more
Language
English
Read more
Genres
True Crime / General
Read more
Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
Read more
Read Aloud
Available on Android devices
Read more

Reading information

Smartphones and Tablets

Install the Google Play Books app for Android and iPad/iPhone. It syncs automatically with your account and allows you to read online or offline wherever you are.

Laptops and Computers

You can read books purchased on Google Play using your computer's web browser.

eReaders and other devices

To read on e-ink devices like the Sony eReader or Barnes & Noble Nook, you'll need to download a file and transfer it to your device. Please follow the detailed Help center instructions to transfer the files to supported eReaders.
James Bradley
In this unforgettable chronicle of perhaps the most famous moment in American military history, James Bradley has captured the glory, the triumph, the heartbreak, and the legacy of the six men who raised the flag at Iwo Jima. Here is the true story behind the immortal photograph that has come to symbolize the courage and indomitable will of America.

In February 1945, American Marines plunged into the surf at Iwo Jima—and into history. Through a hail of machine-gun and mortar fire that left the beaches strewn with comrades, they battled to the island's highest peak. And after climbing through a landscape of hell itself, they raised a flag.

Now the son of one of the flagraisers has written a powerful account of six very different young men who came together in a moment that will live forever.

To his family, John Bradley never spoke of the photograph or the war. But after his death at age seventy, his family discovered closed boxes of letters and photos. In Flags of Our Fathers, James Bradley draws on those documents to retrace the lives of his father and the men of Easy Company. Following these men's paths to Iwo Jima, James Bradley has written a classic story of the heroic battle for the Pacific's most crucial island—an island riddled with Japanese tunnels and 22,000 fanatic defenders who would fight to the last man.

But perhaps the most interesting part of the story is what happened after the victory. The men in the photo—three were killed during the battle—were proclaimed heroes and flown home, to become reluctant symbols. For two of them, the adulation was shattering. Only James Bradley's father truly survived, displaying no copy of the famous photograph in his home, telling his son only: "The real heroes of Iwo Jima were the guys who didn't come back."

Few books ever have captured the complexity and furor of war and its aftermath as well as Flags of Our Fathers. A penetrating, epic look at a generation at war, this is history told with keen insight, enormous honesty, and the passion of a son paying homage to his father. It is the story of the difference between truth and myth, the meaning of being a hero, and the essence of the human experience of war.


From the Hardcover edition.
James Bradley
In early 2012 in Sydney and Melbourne, forty-one new novelists embarked on 'Writing a Novel' - a six-month creative writing course, under the auspices of Faber Academy at Allen & Unwin. Course directors James Bradley, Sophie Cunningham and Kathryn Heyman walked alongside these new writers as they risked metaphorical life and limb, to reveal their determination, commitment, willingness, courage and importantly their talent.

This anthology is a taster of the new writing growing in Australia. Writing which is marked by its energy, insight and range.

The diversity of genre, subject and style in this volume is an eloquent reminder of the fact that despite our contemporary anxiety about the future of books and writing, literature hasn't gone anywhere. There are new and exciting voices emerging all around us, possessed not just of the desire to tell stories but to say something that matters, to articulate something new and important about the world.

Contributors are: Marita Hastings, Sally Abbott, Deborah Biancotti, Margaret Meran Trail, Elizabeth Cunningham, Julie Morgan King, Laura McAuliffe, Rowena Robertson, Paulene Turner, Lisa Breeze, Jo McKay, Kerri Turner, Stephanie King, Chris Brophy, Linda Dement, Nik Rodden, Peter Ward, Jill Gientzotis, Caroline Beecham, Sienna Brown, Gita Mammen, Bethany Adams, Elisabeth Passmore, Keith Whalley, Steph Little, Catherine Horan, Cynthia Pretty, Stuart McCullough, Becky Keft, Isabel Noriega, Elizabeth Jones, Birgit Daller, Maria Boyd, David McMahon, Hannah Bent, and Louisa McGauley.
©2017 GoogleSite Terms of ServicePrivacyDevelopersArtistsAbout Google
By purchasing this item, you are transacting with Google Payments and agreeing to the Google Payments Terms of Service and Privacy Notice.