Practical Plant Identification: Including a Key to Native and Cultivated Flowering Plants in North Temperate Regions

Cambridge University Press
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Practical Plant Identification is an essential guide to identifying flowering plant families (wild or cultivated) in the northern hemisphere. Details of plant structure and terminology accompany practical keys to identify 318 families into which flowering plants are divided. Specifically designed for practical use, the keys can easily be worked backwards for checking identifications. Containing descriptions of families and listings of the genera within, it also includes a section on further identification to generic and specific levels. A successor to the author's bestselling The Identification of Flowering Plant Families, this guide is updated, and retains the same concise user-friendly approach. Cullen skillfully leads the reader from restrictive disciplines of older taxonomy, into an era of increasing numbers of plant families defined by DNA analysis. Aimed primarily at students of botany and horticulture, this is a perfect introduction to plant identification for anyone interested in plant taxonomy.
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About the author

James Cullen is Director of the Stanley Smith (UK) Horticultural Trust. He is also holder of the Gold Vetch Memorial Medal which is awarded to people who have helped in the advancement and improvement of the science and practice of horticulture.

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Additional Information

Publisher
Cambridge University Press
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Published on
Sep 14, 2006
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Pages
256
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ISBN
9781139458757
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Best For
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Language
English
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Genres
Science / Life Sciences / Botany
Science / Life Sciences / Horticulture
Science / Life Sciences / Taxonomy
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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