Securities Regulation: Cases and Materials, Edition 8

Wolters Kluwer Law & Business
Free sample

The national reputation of the authors, their balance of practice and doctrine, and a highly teachable structure have all made Securities Regulation: Cases and Materials the best-selling text in the field. Applauded for excellent coverage of the 1934 and 1935 Acts, the text remains sophisticated yet not intimidating. Modular chapters adapt to a variety of teaching styles, giving the instructor flexibility in course design. Well-written, interesting problems expose students to theory as well as the practical issues that impact investors.

New to the Eighth Edition:

  • The casebook fully integrates all the newly adopted exemptions such as Regulation A, Crowdfunding, and the newly enacted resale exemption Section 4(a)(7) along with problems developed to illustrate their operation
  • Complete reworking of exemption chapter, including new material and problems on Regulation A+, Crowdfunding, and relaxation of solicitation restrictions for certain Rule 506 offerings
  • Examines market developments such as Unicorns and the disappearance of listings in the U.S. and abroad
  • Changes in underwriting processes with emphasis given to role of research reports in promoting public offerings
  • Compete treatment of the Supreme Court’s 2014 Halliburton decision, and the post-Halliburton developments on proving price distortion and pleading loss causation
  • Thorough treatment of the Supreme Court’s Omnicare decision on liability for statements of opinion
  • Materials and problems on proxy regulation, particularly in the aftermath of the Walmart case under Rule 14a-8
  • Materials on insider trading tipper-tippee liability in the aftermath of Newman and Salman
  • Contemporary problems facing hedge funds, investment advisers and mutual funds
  • New material on post-Morrision developments affecting extraterritorial application of securities laws
  • New material and problems on real estate as securities including the Ninth Circuit's Salameh decision

The purchase of this Kindle edition does not entitle you to receive 1-year FREE digital access to the corresponding Examples & Explanations in your course area. In order to receive access to the hypothetical questions complemented by detailed explanations found in the Examples & Explanations, you will need to purchase a new print casebook.

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Additional Information

Publisher
Wolters Kluwer Law & Business
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Published on
Nov 8, 2016
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Pages
1200
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ISBN
9781454885665
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Language
English
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Genres
Law / Legal Education
Law / Securities
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Available on Android devices
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In the midst of globalization, technological change, and economic anxiety, we have deep doubts about how well the task of investor protection is being performed. In the U.S., the focus is on the Securities & Exchange Commission. Part of the explanation is economic and political: the failure to know the right balance between investor protection and capital formation, and the resulting battle among interest groups over their preferred solutions. In Selling Hope, Selling Risk, author Donald C. Langevoort argues that regulation is also frustrated at nearly every turn by human nature, as exhibited both on the buy-side (investors) and sell-side (corporate executives, bankers, stockbrokers). There is plenty of savvy and guile, but also ample hope, fear, ego, overconfidence, social contagion and the like that persistently filter and distort the messages regulators try to send. This book is the first sustained effort to link the key initiatives of securities regulation with our burgeoning awareness in the social sciences of how people and organizations really behave in economic settings. It examines why corporate fraud occurs and how best to deter it and compensate its victims; the search for an edge via insider trading; the disclosure apparatus and its gatekeepers; sales efforts and manipulation in Ponzi schemes, internet scams, private offerings and crowdfunding; and how this all helps explain the recent global financial crisis. It ends by turning these insights back on the task of regulation itself, and the strategies (and frustrations) of making regulation work in a financial world that is at once increasingly sophisticated yet deeply human and incurably flawed.

Professors Fischl and Paul explain law school exams in ways no one
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One L, Scott Turow's journal of his first year at law school introduces and a best-seller when it was first published in 1977, has gone on to become a virtual bible for prospective law students. Not only does it introduce with remarkable clarity the ideas and issues that are the stuff of legal education; it brings alive the anxiety and competiveness--with others and, even more, with oneself--that set the tone in this crucible of character building. Turow's multidimensional delving into his protagonists' psyches and his marvelous gift for suspense prefigure the achievements of his celebrated first novel, Presumed Innocent, one of the best-selling and most talked about books of 1987.

Each September, a new crop of students enter Harvard Law School to begin an intense, often grueling, sometimes harrowing year of introduction to the law. Turow's group of One Ls are fresh, bright, ambitious, and more than a little daunting. Even more impressive are the faculty: Perini, the dazzling, combative professor of contracts, who presents himself as the students' antagonist in their struggle to master his subject; Zechman, the reserved professor of torts who seems so indecisive the students fear he cannot teach; and Nicky Morris, a young, appealing man who stressed the humanistic aspects of law.

Will the One Ls survive? Will they excel? Will they make the Law Review, the outward and visible sign of success in this ultra-conservative microcosm? With remarkable insight into both his fellows and himself, Turow leads us through the ups and downs, the small triumphs and tragedies of the year, in an absorbing and throught-provoking narrative that teaches the reader not only about law school and the law but about the human beings who make them what they are.

In the new afterword for this edition of One L, the author looks back on law school from the perspective of ten years' work as a lawyer and offers some suggestions for reforming legal education.

Radiation Oncology: Rationale, Technique, Results, by James D. Cox, MD and K. Kian Ang, MD, PhD, provides you with authoritative guidance on the latest methods for using radiotherapy to treat patients with cancer. Progressing from fundamental principles through specific treatment strategies for the cancers of each organ system, it also addresses the effects of radiation on normal structures and the avoidance of complications. This 9th edition covers the most recent indications and techniques in the field, including new developments in proton therapy and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). It also features, for the first time, full-color images throughout the text to match those that you see in practice, and uses new color-coded treatment plans to make targets, structures, and doses easier to read at a glance. Evidence from randomized clinical trials is included whenever possible to validate clinical recommendations. The state-of-the-art coverage inside this trusted resource equips you to target cancer as effectively as possible while minimizing harm to healthy tissue.Stands apart as the only book in the field to cover the conceptual framework for the use of radiotherapy by describing the most effective techniques for treatment planning and delivery and presenting the results of each type of therapy. Emphasizes clinical uses of radiation therapy, providing pertinent, easy-to-understand information on state-of-the-art treatments. Includes information useful for non-radiotherapists, making it "recommended reading" for other oncology specialists. Offers a practical, uniform chapter structure to expedite reference. Guides you through the use of the newest radiation oncology techniques, including principles of proton therapy and new developments in intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT).Incorporates evidence from randomized clinical trials whenever possible to validate clinical recommendations. Presents full-color images throughout to match the images that you see in practice.Extensive use of "combination" imaging presents a complete picture of how to more precisely locate and target the radiotherapy field.
In the midst of globalization, technological change, and economic anxiety, we have deep doubts about how well the task of investor protection is being performed. In the U.S., the focus is on the Securities & Exchange Commission. Part of the explanation is economic and political: the failure to know the right balance between investor protection and capital formation, and the resulting battle among interest groups over their preferred solutions. In Selling Hope, Selling Risk, author Donald C. Langevoort argues that regulation is also frustrated at nearly every turn by human nature, as exhibited both on the buy-side (investors) and sell-side (corporate executives, bankers, stockbrokers). There is plenty of savvy and guile, but also ample hope, fear, ego, overconfidence, social contagion and the like that persistently filter and distort the messages regulators try to send. This book is the first sustained effort to link the key initiatives of securities regulation with our burgeoning awareness in the social sciences of how people and organizations really behave in economic settings. It examines why corporate fraud occurs and how best to deter it and compensate its victims; the search for an edge via insider trading; the disclosure apparatus and its gatekeepers; sales efforts and manipulation in Ponzi schemes, internet scams, private offerings and crowdfunding; and how this all helps explain the recent global financial crisis. It ends by turning these insights back on the task of regulation itself, and the strategies (and frustrations) of making regulation work in a financial world that is at once increasingly sophisticated yet deeply human and incurably flawed.
In the midst of globalization, technological change, and economic anxiety, we have deep doubts about how well the task of investor protection is being performed. In the U.S., the focus is on the Securities & Exchange Commission. Part of the explanation is economic and political: the failure to know the right balance between investor protection and capital formation, and the resulting battle among interest groups over their preferred solutions. In Selling Hope, Selling Risk, author Donald C. Langevoort argues that regulation is also frustrated at nearly every turn by human nature, as exhibited both on the buy-side (investors) and sell-side (corporate executives, bankers, stockbrokers). There is plenty of savvy and guile, but also ample hope, fear, ego, overconfidence, social contagion and the like that persistently filter and distort the messages regulators try to send. This book is the first sustained effort to link the key initiatives of securities regulation with our burgeoning awareness in the social sciences of how people and organizations really behave in economic settings. It examines why corporate fraud occurs and how best to deter it and compensate its victims; the search for an edge via insider trading; the disclosure apparatus and its gatekeepers; sales efforts and manipulation in Ponzi schemes, internet scams, private offerings and crowdfunding; and how this all helps explain the recent global financial crisis. It ends by turning these insights back on the task of regulation itself, and the strategies (and frustrations) of making regulation work in a financial world that is at once increasingly sophisticated yet deeply human and incurably flawed.
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