The Shaman Sings

Charlie Moon Mysteries

Book 1
Sold by Minotaur Books
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The shocking death of a female physics student has shattered the peaceful community of Granite Creek, Colorado—and police chief Scott Parrish has a hunch he can't even begin to explain. He saw the killing...in his dreams.

Daisy Perika experienced the same visions. An aged Ute shaman who lives in a trailer on the lonesome highlands, hers is the realm of the Native American spirit. But Daisy doesn't need scientific proof to know that the student's breakthrough discovery was to kill for. And it isn't over yet.

Parrish wants to believe that Daisy can unleash the truth. But will her visions of Coyote and fire make for evidence in a court of law? Now it's up to Parrish and Daisy's nephew, Tribal Police investigator Charlie Moon, to summon the supernatural and seize the killer—before he strikes again...in James D. Doss's The Shaman Sings.

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About the author

James D. Doss is the author of the Charlie Moon mysteries, including A Dead Man's Tale and The Widow's Revenge. Two of the Moon books were named one of the best books of the year by Publishers Weekly. Originally from Kentucky, he divides his time between Los Alamos and Taos, New Mexico.
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Additional Information

Publisher
Minotaur Books
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Published on
Mar 1, 2016
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Pages
272
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ISBN
9781250114044
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Features
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Language
English
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Genres
Fiction / Mystery & Detective / Private Investigators
Fiction / Native American & Aboriginal
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Read Aloud
Available on Android devices
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Eligible for Family Library

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