The Bard & Scheherazade Keep Company: Poems

Able Muse Press
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 In The Bard and Scheherazade Keep Company, Jan D. Hodge shows impressive formal dexterity, and inventive use of the double dactyl. He turns the difficult form on its head as it transforms into a narrative vehicle, retelling the great classics—the plays of Shakespeare, the One Thousand and One Nights stories from the Islamic Golden Age (as recounted by the legendary Scheherazade to the sultan Shahrayar), and the series of medieval European folktales about the trickster, Reynard the Fox. Hodge’s versification of these classic masterpieces manages to liberate this restrictive form and yet sustain its strict rules. This delightfully witty, quirky, playful collection reads naturally, while remaining lexicographically bounteous.

PRAISE FOR THE BARD AND SCHEHERAZADE KEEP COMPANY:

Jan D. Hodge has given us an astonishing book—as remarkable a tour de force as ever I’ve seen.  I wouldn’t have thought that witty verse form, the double dactyl, could be used to tell a story, but modifying the pattern only slightly, Hodge retells some celebrated stories in enjoyable style—Shakespeare plays, six tales from the Arabian Nights, and the popular medieval legend of Reynard the Fox.  You don’t have to admire poetic ingenuity to read them with pleasure, but I’m all dumb doglike admiration at Hodge’s spectacular triumph.
             —X.J. Kennedy

Jan D. Hodge’s mastery of the double dactyl is nothing short of stunning.  Open this book at random, and you will find the form perfectly used, the language both natural and original, and the wit a delight.  From Romeo to Reynard, you’re going to love these poems.
             —Gail White

Jan D. Hodge has renovated the most challenging of light verse forms and transformed it into a vehicle for poems that revisit classic works of literature.  Hodge’s deft handling of meter and intermittent quirky notes create a sense of intimacy between the reader and the poet that is both enjoyable and rare in today’s poetry.
             —A.M. Juster

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About the author

 Jan D. Hodge grew up in a letterpress printing shop in small town Michigan, and received his BA and MA degrees from the University of Michigan and his PhD from the University of New Mexico, where he wrote his dissertation on Charles Dickens. He taught at Rockford (Illinois) College and at Morningside College in Sioux City, Iowa. 

      His poems have appeared in many print and online journals and anthologies, and his book Taking Shape, a collection of carmina figurata, was published in 2015 by Able Muse Press.
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Additional Information

Publisher
Able Muse Press
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Published on
Jun 5, 2017
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Pages
112
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ISBN
9781927409848
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Language
English
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Genres
Humor / Form / Jokes & Riddles
Poetry / American / General
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Available on Android devices
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 An eclectic mix of shapes and subjects populate Taking Shape—Jan D. Hodge’s full-length collection of carmina figurata (sometimes called shaped poems, pattern poetry, or figure poems). Hodge’s many masterpieces include depictions of a saxophone, a Madonna and Child, a combination piano/guillotine, and other silhouettes of amazing difficulty and detail. These poems are not only visually stunning, they are also sonically beautiful, and retain a transcendent freedom while conforming to both illustrative and metrical constraints. Taking Shape is a visual feast of inspired poetry.

PRAISE FOR TAKING SHAPE:

Are not all printed formal poems shaped poems? The sonnet, the hymn, the sestina, and the ghazal all have characteristic shapes rather like boxes that confine their subjects. In Jan D. Hodge’s Taking Shape the subjects have burst from their cages and confront us immediately with what they are. Then the words they are made of can reveal their inner beings. The long closure of “Spring” describes the best way to read these poems. I have long known what prayer is, but I never knew what one looked like until I read “Madonna and Child.”
        — Fred Chappell, author of The Fred Chappell Reader

Here is a perfect matching of shapes and poetry.  Through a wide-ranging array of subjects and tones, Hodge’s mastery of language within such challenging constraints is truly impressive.  Syntax and rhythm, metaphor and symbol (see for instance “The One That Got Away” or “The Lesson of the Snow”), conversational snippets and quatrains, are surprisingly nuanced. Even the occasional poems—wedding, elegy, Valentine’s day, Halloween, Christmas, an early morning poetry reading—find new things to say and striking ways to say them. These poems reward reading again and again.
        — Robert J. Conley, author of Mountain Windsong

Jan D. Hodge is the master par excellence of carmina figurata. In Taking Shape you’ll see such word-pictures as the Chinese ideogram for spring; a harpsichord poised before a guillotine; a still life with quill pen and ink bottle, T-square and drafting triangle. More amazing still, Hodge forms many of the intricate images with metered language—in one case in medieval alliterative verse! In a poem about baseball Hodge writes, “forgiveness/ is the best/ we dare hope for in this bruised world/ the thinnest/ chance that lets us somehow/ slide home free”;  here “only by grace . . . can we be safe.” Hodge knows of grace, his poems are full of grace, and Taking Shape, like grace itself, is a gift of utter beauty.
        — Vince Gotera, Editor, North American Review

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 An eclectic mix of shapes and subjects populate Taking Shape—Jan D. Hodge’s full-length collection of carmina figurata (sometimes called shaped poems, pattern poetry, or figure poems). Hodge’s many masterpieces include depictions of a saxophone, a Madonna and Child, a combination piano/guillotine, and other silhouettes of amazing difficulty and detail. These poems are not only visually stunning, they are also sonically beautiful, and retain a transcendent freedom while conforming to both illustrative and metrical constraints. Taking Shape is a visual feast of inspired poetry.

PRAISE FOR TAKING SHAPE:

Are not all printed formal poems shaped poems? The sonnet, the hymn, the sestina, and the ghazal all have characteristic shapes rather like boxes that confine their subjects. In Jan D. Hodge’s Taking Shape the subjects have burst from their cages and confront us immediately with what they are. Then the words they are made of can reveal their inner beings. The long closure of “Spring” describes the best way to read these poems. I have long known what prayer is, but I never knew what one looked like until I read “Madonna and Child.”
        — Fred Chappell, author of The Fred Chappell Reader

Here is a perfect matching of shapes and poetry.  Through a wide-ranging array of subjects and tones, Hodge’s mastery of language within such challenging constraints is truly impressive.  Syntax and rhythm, metaphor and symbol (see for instance “The One That Got Away” or “The Lesson of the Snow”), conversational snippets and quatrains, are surprisingly nuanced. Even the occasional poems—wedding, elegy, Valentine’s day, Halloween, Christmas, an early morning poetry reading—find new things to say and striking ways to say them. These poems reward reading again and again.
        — Robert J. Conley, author of Mountain Windsong

Jan D. Hodge is the master par excellence of carmina figurata. In Taking Shape you’ll see such word-pictures as the Chinese ideogram for spring; a harpsichord poised before a guillotine; a still life with quill pen and ink bottle, T-square and drafting triangle. More amazing still, Hodge forms many of the intricate images with metered language—in one case in medieval alliterative verse! In a poem about baseball Hodge writes, “forgiveness/ is the best/ we dare hope for in this bruised world/ the thinnest/ chance that lets us somehow/ slide home free”;  here “only by grace . . . can we be safe.” Hodge knows of grace, his poems are full of grace, and Taking Shape, like grace itself, is a gift of utter beauty.
        — Vince Gotera, Editor, North American Review

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