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BoD – Books on Demand

Ich erkläre Ihnen in diesem Buch kurz und knackig, wie man im Internet, effektiv Geld verdienen kann.
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About the author

Ich möchte Ihnen mein Fundiertes wissen weitergeben.

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Additional Information

Publisher
BoD – Books on Demand
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Published on
Feb 6, 2015
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Pages
7
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ISBN
9783734761812
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Language
German
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Genres
Law / General
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Available on Android devices
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Looking especially at widows of master craftsmen in early modern Paris, this study provides analysis of the social and cultural structures that shaped widows' lives as well as their day-to-day experiences. Janine Lanza examines widows in early modern Paris at every social and economic level, beginning with the late sixteenth century when changes in royal law curtailed the movement of property within families up to the time of the French Revolution. The glimpses she gives us of widows running businesses, debating remarriage, and negotiating marriage contracts offer precious insights into the daily lives of women in this period.

Lanza shows that understanding widows dramatically alters our understanding of gender, not only in terms of how it was lived in this period but also how historians can use this idea as a category of analysis. Her study also engages the historiographical issue of business and entrepreneurship, particularly women's participation in the world of work; and explicitly examines the place of the law in the lived experience of the early modern period.

How did widowed women use their newly acquired legal emancipation? How did they handle their emotional loss? How did their roles in their families and their communities change? How did they remain financially solvent without a man in the house? How did they make decisions that had always been made by the men around them? These questions all touch upon the experience of widows and on the ways women related to prevalent structures and ideologies in this society. Lanza's study of these women, the ways they were represented and how they experienced their widowhood, challenges many historical assumptions about women and their roles with respect to the law, the family, and economic activity.

Generations of adults who were adopted as children have been kept in the dark about their original identities. The law sealing birth records, passed in 1935 in California during the Great Depression, swept adoptions emotional complexities under the rug and made it possible to keep adoption itself a secret.

Reflecting extensive archival research and written for general audiences as well as professionals, Growing in the Dark: Adoption Secrecy and Its Consequences takes you through Californias early adoption laws, the sealing of records in the era of baby seller Georgia Tann, and the various consequences of this policy as they unfolded throughout the 20th century.




WHAT REVIEWERS HAVE SAID:


"...articulate, easy to read, and filled with real facts concerning sealed records."
- Jean Brown, adoptee



"If you work or live with adoption, you cannot afford to skip this book. Everyone seeking to reverse outdated sealed records laws should also provide a copy of the slim paperback to their legislatures."
- Mirah Riben, author


"...full of fascinating information...you wont be able to put it down."
- Anita Field, Bastard Nation


"Janine Baer, who was adopted in California, focuses on the California law enacted in 1935 sealing original birth certificates. Contrary to the popular perception, the intent of this law was not to protect the privacy of birthmothers.
Rather, these records were sealed to protect children from the stigma of illegitimacy, to protect adoptive parents from intrusions by birthparents, to allow adoptive parents to keep the childs adoptive status a secret, to create the illusion that the birthparents did not exist, and to prevent adoptees from finding their birthfamilies.
...This is an excellent book for birthparents, adoptees, and adoptive parents who want to know how we got to where we are."
- Jane Edwards, Portland, Oregon


"Growing in the Dark, by virtue of its modest length and accessibility, can be used to educate people both within and outside of the adoption reform movement about the effects of sealed records and the faulty premises used to support them."
- Barbara Busharis, American Adoption Congress "Decree"


"Extensive notes and bibliographic information make it an excellent resource for those arguing for open records."
- Sandra Falconer Pace, Canadian Council of Natural Mothers



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