Software Verification and Analysis: An Integrated, Hands-On Approach

Springer Science & Business Media
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“The situation is good, but not hopeless” (Polish folk wisdom) The text is devoted to the Software Analysis and Testing (SAT) methods and s- porting tools for assessing and, if possible, improving software quality, specifically its correctness. The term quality assurance is avoided for it is this author’s firm belief that in the current state of the art that goal is unattainable, a plethora of “gu- anteed” solutions to the problem notwithstanding. Therefore, the rather awkward phrase “improving correctness” is to be understood as an effort to minimize the number of residual programming faults (“bugs”) and their impact on the software’s behavior, that is, to make the faults tolerable. It is clear that such a minimalist approach is a result of frustration. Indeed, having spent years developing software and teaching (preaching?) “How to do it right,” I still do not know how to go about it with any degree of certainty! It appears then I probably should stop right now, for who with a modicum of common sense would reach for a text that does not offer salvation but (as will be seen) hard work and misery? If I intend to continue, it is only that I suspect there are many professionals out there who have similar doubts. And they are the intended audience of this project. The philosophical underpinning of the text is the importance of sound engine- ing practices in software development.
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About the author

William D. Stanley is an Eminent Professor Emeritus at Old Dominion University and was the recipient of the State Council of Higher Education in Virginia Outstanding Faculty Award. He received his Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering degree at the University of South Carolina. Mr. Stanley also received both his Master of Science in Electrical Engineering and a Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering at the University of North Carolina. Dr. Stanley is a registered professional engineer and a member of IEEE and ASEE.

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Additional Information

Publisher
Springer Science & Business Media
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Published on
Apr 29, 2009
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Pages
234
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ISBN
9781848822405
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Language
English
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Genres
Computers / Information Technology
Computers / Programming / General
Computers / Software Development & Engineering / General
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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In computer science, the primary application of visualization technology is software visualization: the use of graphics to portray information obtained from a static or dynamic analysis of a program. Software visualization is used in several phases of the software development lifecycle, but it is of particular interest in the "back- end" tasks of debugging, performance tuning, and understanding complex systems in order to maintain them. Software visualization is expected to improve the back end of the software development process which can result in huge cost savings. Debugging, tuning and maintaining programs comprise the majority of the high costs associated with software development. Unfortunately, the rate at which these software technologies have improved has been gradual. The task of writing software visualization tools is difficult, and most existing systems are limited to a narrow scope, such as the visualization of a single well-understood algorithm from a hand-instrumented source program. This book presents software visualization at a level suitable for a senior level undergraduate or graduate course or for the interested technical professional. The approach is to give a survey of the field, and then present a specific research framework designed to reduce the effort required to write visualization tools. A wide range of simple program control flow and data structure visualizations are then presented as examples of how to obtain information about program behavior, and how to present it graphically. Source code fragments and screen images illustrate each example.
Most programming languages contain good and bad parts, but JavaScript has more than its share of the bad, having been developed and released in a hurry before it could be refined. This authoritative book scrapes away these bad features to reveal a subset of JavaScript that's more reliable, readable, and maintainable than the language as a whole—a subset you can use to create truly extensible and efficient code.

Considered the JavaScript expert by many people in the development community, author Douglas Crockford identifies the abundance of good ideas that make JavaScript an outstanding object-oriented programming language-ideas such as functions, loose typing, dynamic objects, and an expressive object literal notation. Unfortunately, these good ideas are mixed in with bad and downright awful ideas, like a programming model based on global variables.

When Java applets failed, JavaScript became the language of the Web by default, making its popularity almost completely independent of its qualities as a programming language. In JavaScript: The Good Parts, Crockford finally digs through the steaming pile of good intentions and blunders to give you a detailed look at all the genuinely elegant parts of JavaScript, including:

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With JavaScript: The Good Parts, you'll discover a beautiful, elegant, lightweight and highly expressive language that lets you create effective code, whether you're managing object libraries or just trying to get Ajax to run fast. If you develop sites or applications for the Web, this book is an absolute must.

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