236 Pounds of Class Vice President: A Memoir of Teenage Insecurity, Obesity, and Virginity

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Jason Mulgrew, popular blogger and author of Everything Is Wrong with Me, continues his depreciating yet hilarious self-reflection with 236 Pounds of Class Vice President. 

Set in Mulgrew’s high school years, this genuine and honest memoir revisits his teenage antics and escapades as he, while navigating the indignity of puberty, attempts to run for vice president of the student body, displays a penchant for long fur capes, and (naturally) wonders about sex. 

Mulgrew’s blog, Everything Is Wrong with me, has received more than 200 million hits since its inception in 2004. Complete with awkward, “what was he thinking?” photos—unmitigated proof of Mulgrew’s ungainly adolescence—236 Pounds of Class Vice President is an no-holds-barred yet tender look at the years some of us would rather forget.

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About the author

Jason Mulgrew is the New York Times bestselling author of Everything Is Wrong with Me: A Memoir of an American Childhood Gone, Well, Wrong. He was named one of People's "50 Hottest Bachelors" (seriously). He lives in New York.

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Additional Information

Publisher
Harper Collins
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Published on
Feb 13, 2013
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Pages
240
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ISBN
9780062080011
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Features
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Language
English
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Genres
Biography & Autobiography / Personal Memoirs
Humor / Form / Essays
Humor / General
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Eligible for Family Library

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NATIONAL BESTSELLER

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Praise for Marc Maron and WTF
 
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#1 NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER • The compelling, inspiring, and comically sublime story of one man’s coming-of-age, set during the twilight of apartheid and the tumultuous days of freedom that followed

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Praise for Born a Crime

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