Facing the Music: My Story

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Jennifer Knapp’s meteoric rise in the Christian music industry ended abruptly when she walked away and came out publicly as a lesbian. This is her story—of coming to Christ, of building a career, of admitting who she is, and of how her faith remained strong through it all.

At the top of her career in the Christian music industry, Jennifer Knapp quit. A few years later, she publicly revealed she is gay. A media frenzy ensued, and many of her former fans were angry with what they saw as turning her back on God. But through it all, she held on to the truth that had guided her from the beginning.

In this memoir, she finally tells her story: of her troubled childhood, the love of music that pulled her through, her dramatic conversion to Christianity, her rise to stardom, her abrupt departure from Christian Contemporary Music, her years of trying to come to terms with her sexual orientation, and her return to music and Nashville in 2010, when she came out publicly for the first time. She also talks about the importance of her faith, and despite the many who claim she can no longer call herself a believer, she maintains that she is both gay and a Christian.

Now an advocate for LGBT issues in the church, Jennifer has witnessed heartbreaking struggles as churches wrestle with issues of homosexuality and faith. This engrossing, inspiring memoir will help people understand her story and to believe in their own stories, whatever they may be.
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About the author

Jennifer Knapp is a highly acclaimed singer-songwriter who got her star in Christian Contemporary Music (CCM). Knapp exited CCM in 2002 at the height of her professional music career and seemed to disappear. On her return in 2010, she publicly confirmed that she was gay. Today, she performs and tours extensively and actively engages in advocacy work alongside religious communities and leaders that seek to create an open and affirming spiritual home for lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender people of faith.

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Additional Information

Publisher
Simon and Schuster
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Published on
Oct 7, 2014
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Pages
304
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ISBN
9781476759494
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Features
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Language
English
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Genres
Biography & Autobiography / Entertainment & Performing Arts
Religion / Christian Life / General
Social Science / LGBT Studies / Lesbian Studies
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Eligible for Family Library

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