Social Policy and Social Change: Toward the Creation of Social and Economic Justice, Edition 2

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The Second Edition of Social Policy and Social Change is a timely examination of the field, unique in its inclusion of both a historical analysis of problems and policy and an exploration of how capitalism and the market economy have contributed to them. The New Edition of this seminal text examines issues of discrimination, health care, housing, income, and child welfare and considers the policies that strive to improve them. With a focus on how domestic social policies can be transformed to promote social justice for all groups, Jimenez et al. consider the impact of globalization in the United States while addressing developing concerns now emerging in the global village.
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About the author

The late Jillian Jimenez held a PhD in American History and a PhD in social work, both from Brandeis University, in Waltham, MA. She received her MA in literature from the University of California, Los Angeles, and her MSW from San Diego State University. She taught American history at both Pitzer College, in Claremont, CA, and the University of California, Los Angeles. She joined the California State University School, then Department, of Social Work, where she taught social policy and research in the MSW program. She was he editor of Reflections, a peer-reviewed journal of narratives. She won numerous awards, including a Graves fellowship for teaching excellence, and a Silberman grant for research on the history of African American grandmothers. Her first book, Changing Faces of Madness, explored treatment of mentally disordered persons in the colonial period. Dr. Jimenez published widely on the intersection of history and policy in the areas of mental health, child welfare, HIV and AIDS, and social welfare. She lived and worked with her beloved husband, Dan Jimenez, to whom she dedicated the first edition of this book. Dr. Jimenez passed away suddenly and sadly in fall 2009. She is missed by all who loved and valued her.

Eileen Mayers Pasztor has a BA from Stanford University, a MSW from The Ohio State University, and DSW from The Catholic University of America. She has served as a public agency child welfare caseworker and supervisor, curriculum developer and trainer, and foster and adoptive parent. Prior to joining the faculty at California State University, Long Beach, Dr. Pasztor worked for the Child Welfare League of America (CWLA), directing its national programs for family foster care, kinship care, and adoption. She is a principal designer and developer of resources for the development and support of foster and adoptive parents as partners in child protection, such as the PRIDE Model of Practice and the Collaborating With Kinship Caregivers Model of Practice, published by CWLA and used across the country and internationally. At CSULB, she teaches MSW courses in administration, child welfare, social welfare, and thesis advisement. Dr. Pasztor has published a book and journal articles on foster parenting and kinship care, and she guest edited a special 2011 issue of the Journal of Public Child Welfare on advocacy and public relations. She has received a number of local and national awards for her curriculum development and advocacy work. Dr. Pasztor has trained thousands of child welfare professionals and caregivers, delivered hundreds of keynote addresses and workshops domestically and overseas, and given numerous television, radio, and newspaper interviews, with advocacy always as a central theme.

Ruth M. Chambers, PhD, LCSW, is an associate professor in the School of Social Work at California State University, Long Beach. Her specialty areas are child welfare, service delivery, service integration, and policy practice. Her primary research focuses on the child welfare system where she uses mixed methods to examine child neglect, poverty, services, and family outcomes. Dr. Chambers has conducted numerous research studies; published a book and several articles; and presented at national and international conferences, workshops, and community agencies on these topics. Prior to obtaining her PhD, she was a social worker who specialized in children, youth, and families and worked in a variety of settings such as residential treatment, community organizations, and public agencies for over 20 years. Dr. Chambers currently teaches bachelor’s level courses in direct practice and policy analysis, and master’s level courses in social welfare policy, policy practice, and thesis advisement. She also provides consultation to various advocacy groups, public agencies, and children’s rights organizations throughout the United States. She received her MSW degree from San Diego State University in 1989 and a PhD in social work from the University of Denver in 2006.

Cheryl Pearlman Fujii received a BA degree from Wellesley College, with a double major in anthropology and sociology. She also holds an MPA degree with a concentration in urban planning from California State University, Fullerton. She worked in the Boston University Development Office managing day-to-day operations for the Telefund Campaign, and for the City of Lakewood in both the public information and finance department, where she gained experience ranging from writing for cable television to insurance claims administration. In 1995, Ms. Fujii became the founding administrator of the University of California, Berkeley, California Social Work Education Center’s California Child Welfare Resource Library. Located at CSULB, the library serves California’s county public child welfare offices, schools of graduate social work education, and regional training academies. Ms. Fujii’s expertise is multifold: selecting cutting-edge materials for the collection; providing individualized consultations for faculty and students; editing CalSWEC curricula for publication; creating and maintaining the library website; managing the budget; and serving as a resource on state, national, and international levels.

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Additional Information

Publisher
SAGE Publications
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Published on
Feb 26, 2014
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Pages
520
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ISBN
9781483324159
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Language
English
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Genres
Political Science / Public Policy / Social Services & Welfare
Social Science / Social Work
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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In the current political climate of the U.S., there are noeasily apparent solutions to the social problems we face.William M. Epstein claims that people in need have been poorly served and misled by the American system of social welfare. This is one of those rare works emanating from a social welfare expert that does not offer easy placebos or simplistic claims based on more money.

The Dilemma of American Social Welfare argues against the idea that there are inexpensive cures for serious societal sicknesses. Epstein takes on an immense literature in psychotherapy, social work, and welfare, all offering simple answers to complex problems. Two of the largest social experiments ever undertaken in the U.S. are evaluated in depth. The Negative Income Tax experiments of the 1960s and early 1970s tested the feasibility of an income guarantee; and the Evaluation of State Work/Welfare Initiatives employed a variety of programs to stimulate welfare recipients to find jobs. Epstein also analyzes social services associated with social work and examines approaches to juvenile delinquency and drug addiction.

Epstein is blunt in his denial that traditional welfare can readily resolve major social and economic questions of the times. His work, addressed to the malaise in thesocial welfare or helping professions, should serve asan early warning signal that easy solutions are hard for recipients to identify and harder still for donors to put forth. Although it was originally published in the early 1990s, the book remains relevant to political and social questions of the day, which makes it of interest to sociologists, political scientists, policymakers, researchers, and others interested in policy and urban studies.

Social welfare has a three-thousand-year history in Western society. This book offers a sociological framework that provides conceptual order to the countless details of that history, while highlighting its essentials. Social welfare in all its forms is based on one central concept--help. But there are many versions of help and multiple debates about those versions. The outcomes of some debates have led to withholding help, and these outcomes are an inescapable part of this domain, in the past and in the present. The major versions, their development, and the debates are carefully examined in this volume.

Social Welfare in Western Society argues that in history five basic concepts of help have emerged. These five, explored and developed are: charity, based on a relationship between private donors and recipients; public welfare, based on a relationship between the state and its recipients; social insurance, based on a relationship between the state and beneficiaries of its programs; social service, based on people skilled in interaction providing skill-based time to their clients; mutual aid groups (sometimes misleadingly called self-help groups), whose members are simultaneously helpers and those helped. There are multiple versions of each of these five concepts now usually referred to as social policy issues. There are fierce disagreements about what is helpful and which supposed forms of help are harmful to the wider society.

The book concludes that major debates have centered and continue to center around these major issues: Should the poor be helped or punished? Who is to blame? Do the poor have the same rights as other people? Who should pay? Who should decide? What is the effect of receiving welfare on incentive to work? Who should be helped? This is a masterful text designed for professional and public reading.

Gerald Handel is professor emeritus of sociology at The City College and The Graduate Center, City University of New York. He is the author of Making a Life in Yorkville: Experience and Meaning in the Life Course Narrative of an Urban Working-Class Man, editor of Childhood Socialization, and co-editor of The Psychosocial Interior of the Family, all published by Transaction Publishers.

NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER

Evicted meets Nickel and Dimed in Stephanie Land's memoir about working as a maid, a beautiful and gritty exploration of poverty in America. Includes a foreword by Barbara Ehrenreich.

At 28, Stephanie Land's plans of breaking free from the roots of her hometown in the Pacific Northwest to chase her dreams of attending a university and becoming a writer, were cut short when a summer fling turned into an unexpected pregnancy. She turned to housekeeping to make ends meet, and with a tenacious grip on her dream to provide her daughter the very best life possible, Stephanie worked days and took classes online to earn a college degree, and began to write relentlessly.

She wrote the true stories that weren't being told: the stories of overworked and underpaid Americans. Of living on food stamps and WIC (Women, Infants, and Children) coupons to eat. Of the government programs that provided her housing, but that doubled as halfway houses. The aloof government employees who called her lucky for receiving assistance while she didn't feel lucky at all. She wrote to remember the fight, to eventually cut through the deep-rooted stigmas of the working poor.

Maid explores the underbelly of upper-middle class America and the reality of what it's like to be in service to them. "I'd become a nameless ghost," Stephanie writes about her relationship with her clients, many of whom do not know her from any other cleaner, but who she learns plenty about. As she begins to discover more about her clients' lives-their sadness and love, too-she begins to find hope in her own path.

Her compassionate, unflinching writing as a journalist gives voice to the "servant" worker, and those pursuing the American Dream from below the poverty line. Maid is Stephanie's story, but it's not her alone. It is an inspiring testament to the strength, determination, and ultimate triumph of the human spirit.
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