Managerial Uses of Accounting Information

Springer Series in Accounting Scholarship

Book 4
Springer Science & Business Media
1
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The second edition of Dr. Demski’s book reflects his experiences teaching undergraduates, masters and doctoral students. He emphasizes economic fundamentals as the guiding foundation coupled with an artful application of those fundamentals. This applies to product costing, decision making and evaluation art. Dr. Demski has also removed a great deal of traditional minutiae, in order to keep this theme in constant focus. This thematic approach, in his experience, works in dramatic fashion, and stands in sharp contrast to more traditional presentations of this material. The book is not only for use as a textbook but also as a reference book.
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About the author

Professor Demski has focused on disclosure incentives and optimal contracting. Professor Demski has served on the faculty of Columbia University (1967 - 68), Stanford University (1968 - 1985), and Yale University (1985 - 1994). He has been recognized a number of times for Outstanding Research and Education and received an AAA Seminal Contribution Award in 1994. Professor Demski is noted as one of the most widely published authors in the field with over eighty articles published.

Honors and Grants: Honorary Doctorate, Odense University, 1994; AAA Seminal Contribution Award, 1994; Elm-lvy Award, 1989; AAA Outstanding Educator Award, 1986;AICPA Award for Outstanding Contributions to the Accounting Literature, 1967 and 1970; Notable Contribution to Management Accounting Literature Award, 1996; University of Florida Foundation Research Professorship (2000, 2002); Accounting Hall of Fame, 2000; President, American Accounting Association, 2001-2001.

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Additional Information

Publisher
Springer Science & Business Media
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Published on
May 29, 2008
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Pages
496
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ISBN
9780387774510
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Language
English
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Genres
Business & Economics / Accounting / General
Business & Economics / Accounting / Managerial
Business & Economics / Business Mathematics
Business & Economics / Finance / General
Business & Economics / General
Business & Economics / Information Management
Business & Economics / Operations Research
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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In this book, we synthesize a rich and vast literature on econometric challenges associated with accounting choices and their causal effects. Identi?cation and es- mation of endogenous causal effects is particularly challenging as observable data are rarely directly linked to the causal effect of interest. A common strategy is to employ logically consistent probability assessment via Bayes’ theorem to connect observable data to the causal effect of interest. For example, the implications of earnings management as equilibrium reporting behavior is a centerpiece of our explorations. Rather than offering recipes or algorithms, the book surveys our - periences with accounting and econometrics. That is, we focus on why rather than how. The book can be utilized in a variety of venues. On the surface it is geared - ward graduate studies and surely this is where its roots lie. If we’re serious about our studies, that is, if we tackle interesting and challenging problems, then there is a natural progression. Our research addresses problems that are not well - derstood then incorporates them throughout our curricula as our understanding improves and to improve our understanding (in other words, learning and c- riculum development are endogenous). For accounting to be a vibrant academic discipline, we believe it is essential these issues be confronted in the undergr- uate classroom as well as graduate studies. We hope we’ve made some progress with examples which will encourage these developments.
The purpose of this book is to offer a more systematic and structured treatment of the research on accounting‐based valuation, with a primary focus on recent theoretical developments and the resulting empirical analyses that recognize the role of accounting information in making managerial decisions.

Since its inception, valuation research in accounting has evolved primarily along an “empirically driven” path. In the absence of models constructed specifically to explain this topic, researchers have relied on economic intuition and theories from other disciplines (mainly finance and economics) as a basis for designing empirical analyses and interpreting findings. Although this literature has shed important light on the usefulness of accounting information in capital markets, it is obvious that the lack of a rigorous theoretical framework has hindered the establishment of a systematic and well‐structured literature and made it difficult to probe valuation issues in depth.

More recently, however, progress has been made on the theoretical front. The two most prominent frameworks are (i) the “linear information dynamic approach” and (ii) the “real options‐based approach” which recognizes managerial uses of accounting information in the pursuit of value generation. This volume devotes its initial chapters to an evaluation of the models using the linear dynamic approach, and then provides a synthesis of the theoretical studies that adopt the real options approach and the empirical works which draw on them. The book also makes an attempt to revisit and critique existing empirical research (value-relevance and earnings-response studies) within the real options-based framework. It is hoped that the book can heighten interest in integrating theoretical and empirical research in this field, and play a role in helping this literature develop into a more structured and cohesive body of work.

Value is of ultimate concern to economic decision-makers, and valuation theory should serve as a platform for studying other accounting topics. The book ends with a call for increased links of other areas of accounting research to valuation theory.

In this book, we synthesize a rich and vast literature on econometric challenges associated with accounting choices and their causal effects. Identi?cation and es- mation of endogenous causal effects is particularly challenging as observable data are rarely directly linked to the causal effect of interest. A common strategy is to employ logically consistent probability assessment via Bayes’ theorem to connect observable data to the causal effect of interest. For example, the implications of earnings management as equilibrium reporting behavior is a centerpiece of our explorations. Rather than offering recipes or algorithms, the book surveys our - periences with accounting and econometrics. That is, we focus on why rather than how. The book can be utilized in a variety of venues. On the surface it is geared - ward graduate studies and surely this is where its roots lie. If we’re serious about our studies, that is, if we tackle interesting and challenging problems, then there is a natural progression. Our research addresses problems that are not well - derstood then incorporates them throughout our curricula as our understanding improves and to improve our understanding (in other words, learning and c- riculum development are endogenous). For accounting to be a vibrant academic discipline, we believe it is essential these issues be confronted in the undergr- uate classroom as well as graduate studies. We hope we’ve made some progress with examples which will encourage these developments.
The purpose of this book is to offer a more systematic and structured treatment of the research on accounting‐based valuation, with a primary focus on recent theoretical developments and the resulting empirical analyses that recognize the role of accounting information in making managerial decisions.

Since its inception, valuation research in accounting has evolved primarily along an “empirically driven” path. In the absence of models constructed specifically to explain this topic, researchers have relied on economic intuition and theories from other disciplines (mainly finance and economics) as a basis for designing empirical analyses and interpreting findings. Although this literature has shed important light on the usefulness of accounting information in capital markets, it is obvious that the lack of a rigorous theoretical framework has hindered the establishment of a systematic and well‐structured literature and made it difficult to probe valuation issues in depth.

More recently, however, progress has been made on the theoretical front. The two most prominent frameworks are (i) the “linear information dynamic approach” and (ii) the “real options‐based approach” which recognizes managerial uses of accounting information in the pursuit of value generation. This volume devotes its initial chapters to an evaluation of the models using the linear dynamic approach, and then provides a synthesis of the theoretical studies that adopt the real options approach and the empirical works which draw on them. The book also makes an attempt to revisit and critique existing empirical research (value-relevance and earnings-response studies) within the real options-based framework. It is hoped that the book can heighten interest in integrating theoretical and empirical research in this field, and play a role in helping this literature develop into a more structured and cohesive body of work.

Value is of ultimate concern to economic decision-makers, and valuation theory should serve as a platform for studying other accounting topics. The book ends with a call for increased links of other areas of accounting research to valuation theory.

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