Between Nation and Europe: Labour, the SPD and the European Parliament 1994–1999

Springer Science & Business Media
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Which theories best fit a study of the relationship between parties at the na tional and European level? To date, the theoretical underpinning of works on transnational parties has generally reflected the general debate on European integration. As Haas covered the topic of transnational parties, it follows that 74 neofunctionalism has been drawn upon. This has been complemented by 75 transnationalism and domestic policy approaches. As the talk is of parties, 76 the literature on political parties has been used extensively to conceive of transnational parties as a complementary arena to national parties arenas. ?7 78 More recently, the literature on networks has been used, this demonstrating the tendency to treat transnational political parties as an integral part of the ED system in which they are embedded. This move away from International Relations paradigms has also seen comparativists increasing their interest in 79 transnational parties. Again following the general debate on the nature of the 80 ED, new institutionalist approaches have also been used. In this chapter, I shall introduce the main theoretical basis of this study, New Institutionalism, which will be complemented by considerations of the transformation of political parties. Then, a hypothetical concept of 'detach ment' will be introduced to explain the nature of inter-level party relations in the ED. From this, some hypotheses will be extracted which will be put to test in the later case study. 2. 1.
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About the author

Dr. rer. pol. Joey-David Ovey, Fachbereich Sozialwissenschaften, Universität Osnabrück.
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Additional Information

Publisher
Springer Science & Business Media
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Published on
Dec 6, 2012
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Pages
227
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ISBN
9783322933362
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Language
English
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Genres
Political Science / General
Political Science / History & Theory
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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The definitive biography of a larger-than-life president who defied norms, divided a nation, and changed Washington forever

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One of our most significant yet dimly recalled presidents, Jackson was a battle-hardened warrior, the founder of the Democratic Party, and the architect of the presidency as we know it. His story is one of violence, sex, courage, and tragedy. With his powerful persona, his evident bravery, and his mystical connection to the people, Jackson moved the White House from the periphery of government to the center of national action, articulating a vision of change that challenged entrenched interests to heed the popular will– or face his formidable wrath. The greatest of the presidents who have followed Jackson in the White House–from Lincoln to Theodore Roosevelt to FDR to Truman–have found inspiration in his example, and virtue in his vision.

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